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2019 OIAI Audit Report on the Private Fundraising and Partnerships Division (PFP) | UNICEF Internal Audit and Investigations Skip to main content Internal Audit and Investigations Toggle navigation Global Links Visit UNICEF Global High contrast Internal Audit and Investigations Main navigation About us Internal audit Investigations Search area has closed. (...) Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Document 2019 OIAI Audit Report on the Private Fundraising and Partnerships Division (PFP) About The audit, in April 2019, reviewed UNICEF's Private Fundraising and Partnerships (PFP) Division. Download document Download file (PDF, 347,27 KB) Related topics Data and Reports Audit and investigations Global 2019 reports Headquarters, regional office and thematic reports More to explore Footer OIAI Home About us OIAI Charter Internal Audit Internal Audit reports Investigations Annual Reports Related sites and standards Uniform Principles and Guidelines for Investigations Evaluation About UNICEF What UNICEF does Where UNICEF works UNICEF publications Press centre UNICEF Data Transparency and accountability Work for UNICEF Footer Secondary Legal Terms of Use Footer tertiary Report fraud, abuse, wrongdoing
Language:English
Score: 859404.3 - https://www.unicef.org/auditan...-and-partnerships-division-pfp
Data Source: un
Правовые ресурсы According the Act XIX of 1998 on the criminal procedure (CPA), an aggrieved party, substitute private prosecutor, private party, other interested party as well as the representatives thereof are participants of the criminal proceedings. (...) In connection with terrorism, the aggrieved party may act as substitute private prosecutor or private party, depending on the circumstances of the concrete case. Aggrieved party may act as a substitute private prosecutor if a) the prosecutor or the investigating authority rejected the report or terminated the investigation; b) the prosecutor partly set aside the indictment; c) the prosecutor dropped the charge; d) as a result of the investigation, the prosecutor did not establish the commission of any criminal offence that should be prosecuted based on public prosecution, consequently neither he/she filed an indictment, nor did he/she take over the representation of the indictment as a result of an investigation ordered in a procedure initiated by private prosecution; e) the prosecutor dropped the charge at trial because in his judgment, the criminal offence should not be prosecuted based on public prosecution.
Language:English
Score: 838422.9 - https://www.un.org/victimsofterrorism/ru/node/694
Data Source: un
Legal Resources available to Victims According the Act XIX of 1998 on the criminal procedure (CPA), an aggrieved party, substitute private prosecutor, private party, other interested party as well as the representatives thereof are participants of the criminal proceedings. (...) In connection with terrorism, the aggrieved party may act as substitute private prosecutor or private party, depending on the circumstances of the concrete case. Aggrieved party may act as a substitute private prosecutor if a) the prosecutor or the investigating authority rejected the report or terminated the investigation; b) the prosecutor partly set aside the indictment; c) the prosecutor dropped the charge; d) as a result of the investigation, the prosecutor did not establish the commission of any criminal offence that should be prosecuted based on public prosecution, consequently neither he/she filed an indictment, nor did he/she take over the representation of the indictment as a result of an investigation ordered in a procedure initiated by private prosecution; e) the prosecutor dropped the charge at trial because in his judgment, the criminal offence should not be prosecuted based on public prosecution.
Language:English
Score: 838422.9 - https://www.un.org/victimsofterrorism/en/node/694
Data Source: un
الموارد القانونية المتاحة للضحايا According the Act XIX of 1998 on the criminal procedure (CPA), an aggrieved party, substitute private prosecutor, private party, other interested party as well as the representatives thereof are participants of the criminal proceedings. (...) In connection with terrorism, the aggrieved party may act as substitute private prosecutor or private party, depending on the circumstances of the concrete case. Aggrieved party may act as a substitute private prosecutor if a) the prosecutor or the investigating authority rejected the report or terminated the investigation; b) the prosecutor partly set aside the indictment; c) the prosecutor dropped the charge; d) as a result of the investigation, the prosecutor did not establish the commission of any criminal offence that should be prosecuted based on public prosecution, consequently neither he/she filed an indictment, nor did he/she take over the representation of the indictment as a result of an investigation ordered in a procedure initiated by private prosecution; e) the prosecutor dropped the charge at trial because in his judgment, the criminal offence should not be prosecuted based on public prosecution.
Language:English
Score: 838422.9 - https://www.un.org/victimsofterrorism/ar/node/694
Data Source: un
Recursos legales disponibles para las víctimas According the Act XIX of 1998 on the criminal procedure (CPA), an aggrieved party, substitute private prosecutor, private party, other interested party as well as the representatives thereof are participants of the criminal proceedings. (...) In connection with terrorism, the aggrieved party may act as substitute private prosecutor or private party, depending on the circumstances of the concrete case. Aggrieved party may act as a substitute private prosecutor if a) the prosecutor or the investigating authority rejected the report or terminated the investigation; b) the prosecutor partly set aside the indictment; c) the prosecutor dropped the charge; d) as a result of the investigation, the prosecutor did not establish the commission of any criminal offence that should be prosecuted based on public prosecution, consequently neither he/she filed an indictment, nor did he/she take over the representation of the indictment as a result of an investigation ordered in a procedure initiated by private prosecution; e) the prosecutor dropped the charge at trial because in his judgment, the criminal offence should not be prosecuted based on public prosecution.
Language:English
Score: 834189.7 - https://www.un.org/victimsofterrorism/es/node/694
Data Source: un
Ressources juridiques disponibles pour les victimes According the Act XIX of 1998 on the criminal procedure (CPA), an aggrieved party, substitute private prosecutor, private party, other interested party as well as the representatives thereof are participants of the criminal proceedings. (...) In connection with terrorism, the aggrieved party may act as substitute private prosecutor or private party, depending on the circumstances of the concrete case. Aggrieved party may act as a substitute private prosecutor if a) the prosecutor or the investigating authority rejected the report or terminated the investigation; b) the prosecutor partly set aside the indictment; c) the prosecutor dropped the charge; d) as a result of the investigation, the prosecutor did not establish the commission of any criminal offence that should be prosecuted based on public prosecution, consequently neither he/she filed an indictment, nor did he/she take over the representation of the indictment as a result of an investigation ordered in a procedure initiated by private prosecution; e) the prosecutor dropped the charge at trial because in his judgment, the criminal offence should not be prosecuted based on public prosecution.
Language:English
Score: 834189.7 - https://www.un.org/victimsofterrorism/fr/node/694
Data Source: un
Even if Article 14 required a pass-through analysis, the Panel did not find any reason that the investigating authority had acted inconsistently, based on the evidence.6 1.3 Article 14(a): "usual investment practice … of private investors" 1.3.1 General 7. (...) Thus, we understand the term 'usual practice' to describe common or customary conduct of private investors in respect of equity investment. (...) In our view, it would not be correct to conclude that any loan made by the government (or by private lenders in a market dominated by the government) would ipso facto not be 'commercial'.
Language:English
Score: 832081.3 - https://www.wto.org/english/re...ai17_e/subsidies_art14_jur.pdf
Data Source: un
Julie Makani, Professor and Principal Investigator for Sickle Cell Disease programme, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania Mr. (...) Shah reshaped the $20 billion agency’s operations in more than 70 countries around the world by elevating the role of innovation, creating high-impact public-private partnerships, and focusing US investments to deliver stronger results.  (...) Shah founded Latitude Capital, a private equity firm focused on power and infrastructure projects in Africa and Asia and served as a Distinguished Fellow in Residence at Georgetown University. 
Language:English
Score: 827737.3 - https://sdgs.un.org/events/welcome-and-opening-32695
Data Source: un
Julie Makani, Professor and Principal Investigator for Sickle Cell Disease programme, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania Mr. (...) Shah reshaped the $20 billion agency’s operations in more than 70 countries around the world by elevating the role of innovation, creating high-impact public-private partnerships, and focusing US investments to deliver stronger results.  (...) Shah founded Latitude Capital, a private equity firm focused on power and infrastructure projects in Africa and Asia and served as a Distinguished Fellow in Residence at Georgetown University. 
Language:English
Score: 827737.3 - https://sdgs.un.org/ru/node/32695
Data Source: un
Julie Makani, Professor and Principal Investigator for Sickle Cell Disease programme, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania Mr. (...) Shah reshaped the $20 billion agency’s operations in more than 70 countries around the world by elevating the role of innovation, creating high-impact public-private partnerships, and focusing US investments to deliver stronger results.  (...) Shah founded Latitude Capital, a private equity firm focused on power and infrastructure projects in Africa and Asia and served as a Distinguished Fellow in Residence at Georgetown University. 
Language:English
Score: 827737.3 - https://sdgs.un.org/ar/node/32695
Data Source: un