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NOTE ‑ This configuration applies also to the relation between an IPTV service provider and IPTV content providers. Figure ‎6‑1: Architecture for full integration by service provider For this configuration, the IPTV service provider will have to open its platform to Internet content providers over the Internet. (...) For the push mode, here are the exchanges between the IPTV service provider and the Internet content provider. See Figure ‎6‑4. (...) After this, the IPTV service provider will acquire the contents from the Internet content provider.
Language:English
Score: 304090.65 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it...T-TUT-IPTV-2011-AISC-MSW-E.doc
Data Source: un
Herein, we also describe IPTV service platform as a sub-layer between eclectic mixes of service providers and network providers. This sub-layer provides an interface for emerging service providers and mobility service providers including mobile TV to have access to IPTV terminal devices via one or multiple network providers. (...) Herein, we also describe IPTV service platform as a sub-layer between eclectic mixes of service providers and network providers. This sub-layer provides an interface for emerging service providers and mobility service providers including mobile TV to have access to IPTV terminal devices via one or multiple network providers. (...) A service provider can optionally operate a network. A service provider can optionally be a customer of another service provider.
Language:English
Score: 303706.62 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it...-TUT-IPTV-2010-ISPF-MSW-E.docx
Data Source: un
NOTE - This configuration applies also to the relation between an IPTV service provider and IPTV content providers. Figure 6-1: Architecture for full integration by service provider For this configuration, the IPTV service provider will have to open its platform to Internet content providers over the Internet. (...) For the push mode, here are the exchanges between the IPTV service provider and the Internet content provider. See Figure 6-4. (...) After this, the IPTV service provider will acquire the contents from the Internet content provider.
Language:English
Score: 303704.3 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it...T-TUT-IPTV-2011-AISC-PDF-E.pdf
Data Source: un
MOC application customer MOC platform MOC application Network provider provider provider MOC device provider Y.2061(12)_F6-2 Figure 6-2 – Business roles in an MOC ecosystem Five key roles are identified: MOC application customer, network provider, MOC device provider, MOC platform provider and MOC application provider. • Network provider In the context of this Recommendation, the network provider is the role that offers the NGN capabilities as described in [ITU-T Y.2201]. The network provider has a business relationship with the MOC platform provider and the MOC device providers. NOTE 1 – An actor playing the role of network provider can also play the roles of MOC platform provider, MOC device provider and MOC application provider. • MOC application provider The MOC application provider is the role providing functions in the MOC service domain.
Language:English
Score: 303673.12 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ.../files/basic-html/page279.html
Data Source: un
MOC application customer MOC platform MOC application Network provider provider provider MOC device provider Y.2061(12)_F6-2 Figure 6-2 – Business roles in an MOC ecosystem Five key roles are identified: MOC application customer, network provider, MOC device provider, MOC platform provider and MOC application provider. • Network provider In the context of this Recommendation, the network provider is the role that offers the NGN capabilities as described in [ITU-T Y.2201]. The network provider has a business relationship with the MOC platform provider and the MOC device providers. NOTE 1 – An actor playing the role of network provider can also play the roles of MOC platform provider, MOC device provider and MOC application provider. • MOC application provider The MOC application provider is the role providing functions in the MOC service domain.
Language:English
Score: 303673.12 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica.../files/basic-html/page279.html
Data Source: un
I.1.1 Device provider The device provider is responsible for devices providing raw data and/or content to the network provider and application provider according to the service logic. (...) I.1.3 Platform provider The platform provider provides integration capabilities and open interfaces. (...) Support for different types of IoT applications is also possible. I.1.4 Application provider The application provider utilizes capabilities or resources provided by the network provider, device provider and platform provider, in order to provide IoT applications to application customers.
Language:English
Score: 303538.84 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica.../files/basic-html/page554.html
Data Source: un
22 May 2008 Palais des Nations, Geneva 1.1 Introduction In the Cybersecurity Ecosystem, it is infrastructure- based capabilities that are most important Cybercrime arrangements are worth little except as they drive infrastructure forensic capabilities Among infrastructure-capabilities, it is trusted Identity Management that is most important Infrastructure includes all telecommunications/ICT of which internets are just a small part Among Identity Management, it is trusted service provider identity capabilities that are the most important These capabilities have also the largest benefit-cost ratio: easily and quickly achievable at negligible cost and adverse impact The challenge is how to bring about infrastructure- based cybersecurity capabilities, especially global interoperable trust Universal Trusted Service Provider Identity is essential Significantly diminishes existing and potential threats for Governments Providers Consumers Enhances infrastructure stability Provides developers and service providers with new “trust service” opportunities A universal service provider trust infrastructure can be implemented quickly, easily, and at minimal cost Trusted-SPID is like doing a “fingerprint” check on the identity of a Service Provider Service Provider = everyone except end users (enhances privacy) 1995-2008: the cybersecurity “Perfect Storm” Service Provider trust that is essential for network security was provided by closed, fixed networks operating under substantial domestic and international regulatory regimes During the past decade open public networks (e.g., Internet), wireless, nomadicity, globalization, smart terminal devices, application providers, and a shift away from legacy regulatory regimes without the development of any kind of underlying global service provider trust infrastructure The problem: provider identity and trust have disappeared In the legacy telecom world, service providers were identified and trust levels established through common carrier regulation In the IP-enabled, deregulated network world, it is difficult to identify who the service providers are, much less assess trust levels ? (...) The lack of a trust infrastructure produced inevitable results “Battlefield conditions” Provider fraud, identity theft, phishing, SPAM, “phantom traffic,” Denial of Service attacks, CallerID spoofing, Critical Infrastructure vulnerabilities, etc The increasing transition of public IP- enabled network infrastructures will exacerbate vulnerabilities The problems and abuses will likely continue to increase significantly without effective Service Provider identity trust remedies What is required? A network platform for a universally recognized, globally unique identifier (a kind of call-sign) for each provider the ability to allow instant interoperable discovery and lookup of identity “trust information” associated with the provider Enable other providers and users to make trust decisions when relying on a provider’s identity and assertions in any context or situation Governmental and Intergovernmental action to implement the platform Historically a basic role of the ITU and governments Unlikely to occur without governmental support Enabling Service Provider Trust 666. 01.6 6666 661+ 525.02.12345678+ 464.01.87654321+ 333.10.12345678+ What trust information is available for 333.10.12345678+ Standard universal “overlay” means for discovering and providing structured Service Provider Trust Information Standard universal means of uniquely identifying Service Providers and capturing available structured Trust Information Needs for Trusted Service Provider Identity Amongst Service Providers End Users Government Infrastructure security and integrity Access trust Critical infrastructure protection Traffic exchange and settlements Transaction trust, i.e., minimize fraud Emergency telecommunication services Roaming settlements Protection against identity theft Law enforcement forensics Content IPR protection, controls and fee settlements Protection of Personally Identifiable Information Public safety services Access of content/application providers to traffic termination providers Preventing unwanted intrusions, e.g., SPAM, cyberstalking Universal Service contributions Threat management; incident response trust capabilities Trusted Caller/Sender ID Number resource allocations Federation interoperability; provider bridging capabilities Government network security and integrity “Network Neutrality” Disability assistance “Network Neutrality” Service Provider Trust Information Service Provider Credentials o X.509 PKI digital certificates o Other credentials Service Provider Assigned identifiers o Operational identifiers (e.g., OIDs, ITU Carrier Codes, E.212 MCC/MNCs, Autonomous System Number blocks, IP address handles) o Signalling point codes (SANS) o Public safety and emergency telecommunications identifiers o Billing and settlement identifiers o Regulatory identifiers o Tax identifiers o Law Enforcement identifiers (LI and retained retention) Service Provider Allocated Public Numbering Resources o E.164 number blocks o IPv4/v6 addresses blocks o Autonomous System Number blocks Service Provider Attributes o Legal name o Business names o Headquarters jurisdiction o Billing and settlement attributes o Federations o Emergency services authorizations and capabilities o Disability assistance capabilities o Customer support contacts o Privacy support capabilities o Additional regulatory, infrastructure protection, and security attributes Service Provider Patterns o Reputation datastores or metadata Trusted Service Provider Identity Architecture TSPID Registration Authority 1.Accepts TIPs 2.Places TIPS in Query system 3.Issues unique SPID Identifier + digital key TSPID Registration Authority 1.Accepts TIPs 2.Places TIPS in Query system 3.Issues unique SPID Identifier + digital key Other Providers & End Users 1.Gets appropriate TAP for a transaction 2.Queries for TIPS from Registration Authority 3.Obtains Service Provider Trust Information 4.Assesses trust level Other Providers & End Users 1.Gets appropriate TAP for a transaction 2.Queries for TIPS from Registration Authority 3.Obtains Service Provider Trust Information 4.Assesses trust level TSPID Information Profile (TIP) TSPID Information Profile (TIP) Service Provider 1.Submits TIPS 2.Receives SPID Identifier + digital key Service Provider 1.Submits TIPS 2.Receives SPID Identifier + digital key TSPID Information Profile (TIP) TSPID Information Profile (TIP) TSPID Information Profile (TIP) TSPID Information Profile (TIP) TSPID Assurance Profile (TAP) TSPID Assurance Profile (TAP) Service Provider Trust Information Service Provider Trust Information Service Provider Trust Information Service Provider Trust Information Service Provider Trust Information Service Provider Trust Information TSPID Assurance Profile (TAP) TSPID Assurance Profile (TAP) TSPID Assurance Profile (TAP) TSPID Assurance Profile (TAP) Published templates that describe how to express Service Provider Trust Information Published templates that describe how to express Service Provider Trust Information Published templates that describe how to assess Service Provider Trust Information Published templates that describe how to assess Service Provider Trust Information Service Provider Trust Information can exist either at the Registration Authority or at any accessible network address Service Provider Trust Information can exist either at the Registration Authority or at any accessible network address Trusted Service Provider Identity is core to cybersecurity All technical implementation components exist today Trusted SPID requirements can be readily implemented on many different technical platforms Highest performance platform is found in the past seven years of work on for telephone numbers and product codes on Domain Name System Standards activity now underway in ITU-T and regional/national standards bodies All of the “running code” is available, open-source with no intellectual property constraints Highly synergistic with ongoing trust “federation” activities, NGN, and other industry developments The work incents an existing developer community to produce new “trust applications” All legal system implementation components exist today ITU Constitution Art. 42 obligates signatories (nearly every nation) to take steps to avoid harm to facilities and telecommunications Maintaining the integrity of telecommunication infrastructure and services goes back to earliest treaty instrument in 1850 The obligation became a core component of the 1903 draft wireless radio convention Became integrated in 1920 as an obligation to “organize as far as possible in such a manner as not to disturb the services of other Administrations…” Reflected in later instruments as an obligation “to avoid harmful interference” Expanded in 1989 in the ITU Constitution to avoid "technical harm…to the operation of other telecommunication services of other Member States” Every nation has the authority to implement registration capabilities for those constituting public ICT/telecommunication networks or offering services to the public over those networks Registration authority is widely implemented by telecom regulatory, justice, infrastructure protection, consumer protection, tax, and business agencies A requirement to register is not “regulation” Is history repeating itself One hundred years ago New wireless digital networks and services were operating in chaos and harming each other's communications Nations joined together to adopt basic global norms and mechanisms Cooperate to minimize harm to another party’s infrastructure and communications Facilitate interoperation Institute trusted service provider identity Agreement was finally achieved immediately after Titanic sinking
Language:English
Score: 302557.71 - https://www.itu.int/osg/csd/cy...080522_wsisC5_session2_1.1.pdf
Data Source: un
A detailed explanation is as follows: The DSF service provider configures the single virtual volume based on the cloud storages provided by DSF local storage provider. (...) In addition, DSF service providers provide real-time monitoring of the performance of each data storage and use it with a mirroring mechanism to provide optimized services for stability and performance. For example, when a DSF service customer uses his or her own data, virtual data storage provides a service by selecting a data storage that can provide optimal service among the mirrored data storage; B. enhancement of performance without storage mirroring (b): DSF service provider provides real-time performance monitoring for each data storage.
Language:English
Score: 302441.36 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica.../files/basic-html/page284.html
Data Source: un
A detailed explanation is as follows: The DSF service provider configures the single virtual volume based on the cloud storages provided by DSF local storage provider. (...) In addition, DSF service providers provide real-time monitoring of the performance of each data storage and use it with a mirroring mechanism to provide optimized services for stability and performance. For example, when a DSF service customer uses his or her own data, virtual data storage provides a service by selecting a data storage that can provide optimal service among the mirrored data storage; B. enhancement of performance without storage mirroring (b): DSF service provider provides real-time performance monitoring for each data storage.
Language:English
Score: 302441.36 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica.../files/basic-html/page142.html
Data Source: un
Page 324 - 2015 Security in Telecommunications and Information Technology           Basic HTML Version Table of Contents View Full Version Page 324 - 2015 Security in Telecommunications and Information Technology P. 324 3 Unleashing the potential of the Internet of Things 8.5 Service requirements of a platform provider The following platform provider requirements are essential for the support of EHM services. 1) In addition to IoT common service capabilities, the platform provider needs to provide EHM dedicated service capabilities for EHM services. 2) The platform provider needs support for EHM service information sharing. 3) The platform provider needs support for data storage of EHM service information, e.g., to ensure EHM service information is not lost or inconsistent. 4) The platform provider needs support for the collection of fault information from devices, networks, service support platforms and applications to give verdict on whether the root of an accident comes from the service support platform. 5) The platform provider needs support for time synchronization for EHM devices, service support platforms and application servers. 8.6 Service requirements of an EHM application provider 8.6.1 EHM application provider's essential requirements The following EHM application provider requirements are essential for the support of EHM services. 1) The EHM application provider needs support for EHM service information sharing. 2) The EHM application provider needs support for the collection of fault information from devices, networks, service support platforms and applications to give verdict on whether the root of an accident comes from the application. 3) The EHM application provider needs support for protecting the EHM customer's personal information. 4) The EHM application provider needs support for registration management of an EHM customer's devices. 5) The EHM application provider needs support for distinguishing the accuracy of the EHM data collected by the EHM devices. 6) The EHM application provider needs support for time synchronization of the EHM data provided to EHM applications by EHM devices. 8.6.2 EHM application provider's essential but not EHM specific requirements The following EHM application provider requirements are essential for the support of EHM services but are not specific to EHM services. 1) The EHM application provider needs support for the upgrade of software/firmware hosted in EHM devices. 2) The EHM application provider needs support for flexible accounting from the network provider and/or platform provider. 3) The EHM application provider needs support for EHM service access which is independent of the EHM application's location, i.e., EHM applications need to be accessed by EHM customers continuously no matter where the EHM applications are located. 4) The EHM application provider needs support for network switching mechanisms in order to be able to change the network provider to which applications can subscribe. 5) The EHM application provider needs support for getting the location information of EHM customers. 310 Rec.
Language:English
Score: 302441.36 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ.../files/basic-html/page324.html
Data Source: un