Home

Results 81 - 90 of 550,274 for providers. Search took 3.405 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
The degree of interactivity needed may be different depending on the kind of service provided; such need may concern the main service for which the secondary distribution network is intended, namely the distribution of television to the home; it may also concern some additional services that may be provided through the same network, separately from the main service provided. (...) The characteristics of the return channel from the user to the programme provider, that the network may provide, will generally influence the degree of interactivity possible. (...) These networks provide a wideband forward channel from the service provider to the home user, to deliver the demanded television programme, and a narrow-band return channel from the user to the service provider, used to convey the demand messages.
Language:English
Score: 223329.05 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/2001-2004/com09/sg9-q5.html
Data Source: un
Sometimes, other companies provide these discounted goods and services. These companies are called “third party service providers”. (...) If your provider is not a network provider, you are responsible to request approval from us in advance. (...) If your provider is not a network provider, you are responsible to request approval from us in advance.
Language:English
Score: 223305.64 - https://www.un.org/insurance/s...urance/files/mdrxbk20sf-01.pdf
Data Source: un
Please provide information on the incidence of unsafe abortion and its impact on women’s health, including maternal mortality. (...) Disadvantaged groups of women 18. Please provide information on the situation of women with disabilities, in particular those affected by conflict, as well as on the assistance provided to women who have acquired disabilities owing to conflict. (...) Please provide information on the situation of women and girls in detention, especially in the Gaza Strip.
Language:English
Score: 223295.34 - https://www.un.org/unispal/wp-...ds/2018/09/CEDAW.C.PS_.Q.1.pdf
Data Source: un
Services level A. SERVICE PROVIDER PERSPECTIVES HIV integration into SRH services: • a large proportion of SRH providers provided some Hiv-related services. for example, 73 per cent provided Hiv testing, 77 per cent general information on Hiv and 93 per cent condoms, while fewer provided Hiv clinical or care services. among the providers, 77 per cent said they provided information to most-at-risk populations. psychosocial support was provided by 77 per cent and positive prevention by around 40 per cent. • the assessment also gauged the level of provision of Hiv-related services within specific types of SRH services. the most common entry point was family planning (fp) and Sti prevention and treatment. in both of these, 96 per cent provided condoms, over 80 per cent general information and 64 per cent and 75 per cent respectively Hiv testing. in both cases, 32 per cent provided pMtct services (although often limited to contraception and Hiv prevention advice). • a high proportion of SRH providers (80–90 per cent depending on the specific service in question) stated that they could provide clients with access to Hiv services either by direct provision or referral to other providers within the same facility on the same day. (...) Services related to abortion and gBv are less commonly provided and are less likely to integrate Hiv components. (...) SRH integration into HIV services: • all of the Hiv facilities also provided Sti treatment and prevention services. However, levels of integration of other SRH services were much lower: 36.7 per cent provided services related to fp, 26.7 per cent McH, 23 per cent gBv and 20 per cent post-abortion care. • the Hiv facilities most likely to be able to provide a related SRH service were Hiv testing facilities. providers focused on home-based care or psychosocial support were least likely to provide additional SRH services. • Where Hiv practitioners stated they were not able to provide SRH services, the majority said they were able to refer clients within the same establishment on the same day. • 63 per cent of Hiv service providers stated that they monitored clients who had been referred to other providers for other services. • the assessment indicated that Hiv practitioners are more specialized and less likely to provide SRH-related services when compared with SRH practitioners providing Hiv services.
Language:English
Score: 223295.34 - https://www.who.int/reproducti...topics/linkages/RAStunisia.pdf
Data Source: un
Please include details of all related policies and training. 12. Please provide updated information on any SGBV cases that have been reported to or investigated by the Government of Yemen and provide details of the findings. (...) Please provide details on the findings in each case. How many led to prosecutions? (...) Please provide any relevant documentation of compensation paid. 23.
Language:English
Score: 223287.28 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...019_TO_Government_Yemen_EN.pdf
Data Source: un
., users, devices, network elements, networks, service providers, etc) in multi-network environment o What has to be done • Identify authentication capabilities to be supported • Develop and specify requirements o Why is it important • Protection of NGN infrastructure and services — Authentication is the first line of defense against unauthorized access • Necessary for accounting/billing, law enforcement and other purposes • Better to specify and support authentication capabilities initially as opposed to retro fitting deployed NGNs ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T ITU-T Recommendation X.805 o Authentication Security Dimension Definition • The authentication security dimension serves to confirm the identities of communicating entities. • Authentication ensures the validity of the claimed identities of the entities participating in communication (e.g., person, device, service or application) and provides assurance that an entity is not attempting a masquerade or unauthorized replay of a previous communication. ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T End-to-End View (1 of 2) Authentication of communicating entities in multi- network environment Transport Service Provider A Domain Application Servers Softswitch CSCF Service Stratum Access (xDSL, Cable, FTTP, WiFi, WiMAX) Enterprise Home networks Devices and CPEs Users Transport Service Provider B Domain Application Servers Softswitch CSCF Service Stratum Transit Enterprise Home networks Devices and CPEs Users Access (xDSL, Cable, FTTP, WiFi, WiMAX) 3rd Party Provider UNI NNI UNI ANIANI NNI NNI ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T End-to-End View (2 of 2) o Authentication across UNI, NNI and ANI in a multi- network environment • Access networks (xDSL, Cable, WiFi, WiMAX, etc) • Core networks — Transport stratum — Service/control stratum • 3rd party application providers • Transit network providers • Customer domains (e.g., terminals, home and enterprise networks) o Identity management across multiple service providers and administrative domains ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T Organization of Authentication Functions o Network Access Authentication o Service/Application Authentication o Network-to-Network Authentication o User Peer-to-Peer Authentication o User Authentication of Network o 3rd Party Provider Authentication ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T Network Access Authentication (UNI) o Authentication of customer domain entities to obtain network access connectivity • End user devices and terminals • Home network gateways • Enterprise network gateways o Factors to consider • Identification of customer domain entities • Trust relations and information sharing across multiple administrative domains — Identity management — Mobility — Privacy of user information • Authentication mechanisms to be supported ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T Service/Application Authentication o Authentication of user, device, and user/device combination to obtain • Access to NGN services and features (e.g., Voice) • Access to unique or special services (e.g., ETS) o Factors to consider • Multiple user identities (e.g., user name, telephone number, email address) • Trust relations across multiple administrative domains — Identity management — Mobility — Privacy of user information • Authentication mechanisms (e.g., Using SIP signaling or Web based (http)) ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T Network-to-Network Authentication o Authentication across Network-to-Network Interface (NNI) • Transport authentication — Authentication of communicating entities in the transport network (e.g., transport network elements for bearer traffic) • Service/control authentication — Authentication of communicating entities in the service stratum (e.g., signaling and control network elements such as SBCs, CSCFs, etc) • Management authentication — Authentication of communicating entities in the management plane (e.g., for exchange of management or accounting information) o Factors to consider • Identification of network elements and communicating entities • Trust relations across multiple administrative domains • Authentication mechanisms ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T User Peer-to-Peer Authentication o Peer-to-peer authentication of communicating end users and devices • Calling user authentication of called user • Called user authentication of calling user • User authentication of data origin source o Factors to consider • Feature may be provided as a service • May involve a 3rd party verification (e.g., service provider) • Authentication mechanisms ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T User Authentication of Network o User authentication of the NGN • User authentication of the connected NGN (e.g., access network) • User authentication of the NGN service provider o Factors to consider • Feature may be provided as a service • May involve a 3rd party verification (e.g., service provider) • Network and service provider identity • Trust relations across multiple administrative domains • Authentication mechanisms ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 3rd Party Provider Authentication o Two separate issues to be addressed • 3rd party application provider • 3rd party authentication provider o 3rd party application provider • Authenticating 3rd party application providers for access • Authentication of communicating signaling/control, transport and management entities across ANI o 3rd party authentication provider • Allow for possible use 3rd party providing authentication service o Factors to consider • Authentication mechanisms for ANI • Trust relations across multiple administrative domains ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T Abbreviations and Acronyms o ANI – Access Network Interface o CPE – Customer Premise Equipment o CSCF – Call Session Control Function o DSL – Digital Subscriber Loop o ETS – Emergency Telecommunications Service o FTTP – Fiber To The Premise o NGN – Next Generation Network o NNI – Network-to-Network Interface o UNI – User Network Interface o SBC – Session Border Controller End-to-End Authentication Requirements for NGNs Overview ITU-T Recommendation X.805 End-to-End View (1 of 2) End-to-End View (2 of 2) Organization of Authentication Functions Network Access Authentication (UNI) Service/Application Authentication Network-to-Network Authentication User Peer-to-Peer Authentication User Authentication of Network 3rd Party Provider Authentication Abbreviations and Acronyms
Language:English
Score: 223277.44 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...603/presentations/s5_singh.pdf
Data Source: un
As such, information normally provided on SADIS 2G in this section is not available this year. 3.2 SECURE SADIS FTP SERVICE PROVISION 3.2.1 Analysis of the responses was undertaken by the SADIS Provider, based upon data provided by ICAO. Where a State had not provided an appropriate response, i.e. left the entry blank, the assessment has been based on the remaining States who did provide a valid response. (...) Type your question here: PART E. - CONTACT DETAILS 10. Please provide your contact details to enable ICAO and/or the SADIS Provider to contact you, if necessary, to seek clarification to any of the answers that you have provided to this questionnaire: Name: Organization: Position: Telephone: Email: — END —
Language:English
Score: 223273.34 - https://www.icao.int/airnaviga...ADIS%20EfficacyReportFinal.pdf
Data Source: un
Keywords: health care providers, sexual and reproductive health services, HIV/AIDS, training of service providers, provider–patient relations ECENT advances in HIV prevention and treatment modalities that offer better health and greater life expectancy to people living with HIV have influenced their sexual and repro- ductive expectations. (...) Inadequate knowledge can frustrate both providers and service seekers, as was reported in Zambia. (...) (Interviewed in 2003)15 Different approaches to provider training Different training approaches have been deve- loped to improve capacity of providers for meet- ing expectations of positive people.
Language:English
Score: 223254.79 - https://www.who.int/reproducti...ublications/rtis/providers.pdf
Data Source: un
The descriptions of the resources provided is essentially that suggested by the providers themselves. (...) For example, many providers are not able to provide application assistance (i.e. assistance with actual audits) and numerous organizations are only able to provide assistance to member countries. (...) Application Assistance: Assistance with actual transfer pricing audits. The number of providers able to provide this assistance is limited (see below).
Language:English
Score: 223245.78 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...rPricing-capacity-building.pdf
Data Source: un
UNDRIP in languages United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (A/RES/61/295) – Official UN languages English |  Español  |  Français  | Русский | عربي | 汉语   (PDF version) English | Français | Español | Русский | عربي | 汉语  (Official Resolution Text)       Adolescent friendly version Know your Rights: Adolescent friendly version of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples English Conoce tus Derechos: Declaración de la ONU sobre los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas para adolescentes Español Декларация Организации Объединенных Наций о правах коренных народов:для детей подросткового возраста из числа коренных народов Русский   Other languages Note that these are unofficial translations provided to the Secretariat of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. (...) Arawok (spoken in Surname) – provided by UNDP Suriname Aucan (spoken in Surname) – provided by UNDP Suriname Aymara – provided by COINCABOL Bahasa/Indonesian – provided by West Papua Interest Association Belarusian Bisaya (spoken in the Philippines) – provided by Tebtebba Bodo (Boro) Spoken in India – provided by Indian Confederation of Indigenous and Tribal Peoples North East Zone Carib (spoken in Surname) – provided by UNDP Suriname Cha’palaa (spoken in Equador) – provided by UNICEF, Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Office Catalan – provided by alterNativa Intercanvi amb Pobles Indígenes Crimean Tatar , provided by the Foundation of Research and Support of Indigenous Peoples of Crimea Degar (spoken in Vietnam) povided by the Montagnard Foundation. Dutch , provided by the Netherlands Center for Indigenous Peoples Danish – provided by the Greenland Home Rule Government Finnish – provided by the Government of Finland German – provided by the German Translation Section of the United Nations Greek – provided by UNRIC Brussels Greenlandic – provided by the Greenland Home Rule Government Guaraní – provided by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Paraguay Hindi – provided by UNIC, India Ilokano (spoken in the Philippines) – provided by Tebtebba Innu (spoken in Innu-aimun) – provided by Innu Council of Nitassinan/Institut Tshakapesh Italian – provided by the University of Torino Japanese Karaim – provided by UNIC, Warsaw Karelian (Karjala)–a Finno-Ugric language spoken mainly in the Republic of Karelia (Russian Federation) and partly in Finland–unofficial translation Khmer – provided by RIPP/UNDP Kichua (spoken in the Andes) – provided by UNICEF, Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Office Kituba – provided by UNIC, Congo Kuna – (spoken in Panama) Kwéyòl (spoken in Saint Lucia) Komi  (Komi kyv)–a Finno-Ugric language spoken by the Komi people in the northeastern European part of Russia–unofficial tranlsation Lingala – provided by UNIC, Congo Livvi-Karelian (Livvi)–a Finno-Ugric language spoken mainly in the Republic of Karelia (Russian Federation) and partly in Finland–unofficial translation Malay – provided by RIPP/UNDP Maori (spoken in New Zealand) Maya – (spoken in Central America) Mapuche – provided by UNIC, Argentina Miskito (spoken in Nicaragua and Honduras) Mohawk (spoken in North America) Náhuatl (spoken in Mexico) Nanai (spoken in Russia–Provided by Sakhalin Energy) Norwegian – provided by the Government of Norway Nepali – provided by Nepal Federation of Indigenous Nationalities Persian – provided by UNIC, Tehran Pilipino – provided by Tebtebba Foundation, Philippines Polish – provided by UNIC, Warsaw Portugues – provided by UN Information Centre, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Sámi (North) – provided by Finnish Sámi Parliament Sámi (Inari) – provided by Finnish Sámi Parliament Sámi (Skolt) – provided by Finnish Sámi Parliament Thai – provided by RIPP/UNDP Trio (spoken in Suriname) – provided by UNDP Suriname Turkish – provided by UNIC, Turkey Uilta – (spoken in the Russian Federation) – provided by Sakhalin Energy Ukrainian – provided by Ukrainian Institute of legislation Veps  (Vepsä)–a Finno-Ugric language spoken by the Vepsians in the Republic of Karelia, Leningrad and Vologda regions of the Russian Federation–unofficial tranlsation Wajana (spoken in Suriname) – provided by UNDP Suriname Wichi – provided by UNIC, Argentina FAQs FAQs on the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples PeRs Declaração das Nações Unidas sobre os Direitos dos Povos Indígenas Videos UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: a conversation with experts   More on the Declaration High-level commemoration of the fifth anniversary Advocacy for Adoption Process to Adopt the Declaration Historical Overview State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples News by Year 2022 (3) 2021 (19) 2020 (11) 2019 (19) 2018 (12) 2017 (26) 2016 (45) 2015 (34) United Nations Copyright Fraud Alert Privacy Notice Site Index Terms of Use
Language:English
Score: 192811.99 - https://www.un.org/development...hts-of-indigenous-peoples.html
Data Source: un