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Bethlehem Psychiatric Hospital provides the only facilities of this type in the occupied Palestinian territory. Currently 180 psychiatric patients can be accommodated here, receiving the support and therapy they need to manage their conditions and, sometimes, develop the necessary life skills to eventually move back in with their families. (...) WHO supports the programme at Bethlehem Psychiatric Hospital with funding from the European Union.
Language:English
Score: 2113237.9 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-205668/
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Psychiatric hospitals work with very limited resources in providing mental health care services” explains Dr. Lam Tu Trung, the director of the Da Nang psychiatric hospital. As a part of the community based project of Basic Needs, the psychiatric hospital trains staff from selected commune health stations to identify mental health issues and to provide basic psychotherapy and follow-up care after psychiatric treatment. (...) After several months of group therapy, Ms. Phung was selected to attend training on group facilitation.
Language:English
Score: 2000957.2 - https://www.who.int/vietnam/ne...network-of-care-across-sectors
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Microsoft Word - June Caridad Pagaduan Lopez.docx Name: June Caridad Pagaduan-Lopez Date and place of birth: June 5, 1951 Working Languages: English Current Position / Function: Expert Member, UN Subcommittee on the Prevention of Torture (term expires on 31 December 2016) Fellow, Philippine Psychiatric Association Professor of Psychiatry, University of the Philippines Convenor, Citizen’s Network for Psychosocial Response Executive Director, BalikKalipay Center for Psychosocial Response Educational Background: 1985 Biological Psychiatry, Rigshospitale, Copenhagen, Denmark 1978-1980 Psychiatric Residency, UP – Philippine General Hospital (UP-PGH) 1976-1977 Medical Internship, Brokenshire Memorial Hospital 1972-1976 Doctor of Medicine, UP 1967-1972 Bachelor of Science in Pre-Medicine, UP Main Professional Activities: 39 years of experience in psychiatric patient management; 36 years of designing and conducting stress management, trauma debriefing, counseling and healing workshops for responders and survivors of natural and human induced disasters; 35 years as undergraduate and graduate educator in medical school and public health school; WHO and UNFPA expert on gender and health drafting and reviewing international and national policy documents, programs and guidelines on gender mainstreaming in health and violence against women Other main activities in the field relevant to the mandate of the treaty body concerned: Military, police and judiciary education on human rights peace advocacy, violence against women and torture. (...) Teaching and curriculum development on human rights and humanistic education expertise in conducting and supervising international and local research and training on issues of health emergencies, human rights, gender and health, sexual violence, trauma therapy. Project management and fund-raising for community based international and local projects on psychosocial rehabilitation List of most recent publications in the field relevant to the mandate of the Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture: Enhancing Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Capacities in Emergencies and Disasters in Mindanao – A Manual for Trainors.
Language:English
Score: 1915179.7 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...6/JuneCaridadPagaduanLopez.pdf
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THE DEFENCE’S MOTION AND THE PROSECUTOR’S REPLY The Defence Motion of 9 July: The Defendant asserted that "[t] he Prosecution in this case knowingly and intentionally withheld information from the Defence establishing that Witness A - had suffered ‘psychological trauma’ from the time of her captivity on 15 May 1993 at least to the date of the Certificate (11 July 1995); - was under psychiatric care for at least a year and half, from late 1993 until mid-1995; - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, suffered from suppressed memory; - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, was taking prescription drugs; and - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. (...) The Prosecutor’s Reply of 13 July: In its Response, the Prosecution stated that " on 29 June 1998, it provided the Defence with a redacted certificate and statement from a psychologist at the Medica Women’s Therapy Centre in Zenica concerning Witness A and counseling she received at the Centre". According to the Prosecution, these documents "do not relate to or describe any type of clinical psychiatric treatment or any form of psychiatric care" and the Defence was orally notified before the beginning of the trial that "Witness A had visited the Medica center in Zenica".
Language:English
Score: 1884816.8 - https://www.icty.org/en/press/...l-will-re-open-early-september
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THE DEFENCE’S MOTION AND THE PROSECUTOR’S REPLY The Defence Motion of 9 July: The Defendant asserted that "[t] he Prosecution in this case knowingly and intentionally withheld information from the Defence establishing that Witness A - had suffered ‘psychological trauma’ from the time of her captivity on 15 May 1993 at least to the date of the Certificate (11 July 1995); - was under psychiatric care for at least a year and half, from late 1993 until mid-1995; - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, suffered from suppressed memory; - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, was taking prescription drugs; and - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. (...) The Prosecutor’s Reply of 13 July: In its Response, the Prosecution stated that " on 29 June 1998, it provided the Defence with a redacted certificate and statement from a psychologist at the Medica Women’s Therapy Centre in Zenica concerning Witness A and counseling she received at the Centre". According to the Prosecution, these documents "do not relate to or describe any type of clinical psychiatric treatment or any form of psychiatric care" and the Defence was orally notified before the beginning of the trial that "Witness A had visited the Medica center in Zenica".
Language:English
Score: 1884816.8 - https://www.icty.org/en/node/1970
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In Georgian legislation, the term "rehabilitation/habilitation" implies primary health care measures (Georgian law on “Health care”), also psychosocial rehabilitation (Georgian law on “Psychiatric care”). At the same time, the law of Georgia on “Protection of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities” is jointly prepared by the State Interagency Group of the Ministry of Justice and NGOs. (...) The rule of compulsory treatment of patients is regulated by the Law on Psychiatric Assistance. Involuntary inpatient psychiatric care is carried out when a person does not have the ability to make a decision on mental disorders and is unable to provide psychiatric care without being placed in a hospital, if: a) Delay of assistance will endanger the life and/or health of a patient or other person; b) Patient can take on its own behaviours or cause other substantial material loss. 2. (...) Subprogram activities: therapeutic intervention involving physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, psychological correction, behavioral therapy, also education and training sessions for parents, foster caregivers, educational institution, authorized persons or legal representatives – "Cerebral palsy" – clinical practice recommendations (Guidelines) "On Approval of clinical management of state standards (protocols)” by the order of the Minister of Labour, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia, December 18, 2008, №278/o.
Language:English
Score: 1866129.5 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...isability/Article26/Geogia.pdf
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Forced and coerced psychiatric interventions as torture and ill-treatment Forced and coerced psychiatric interventions have been recognized as a form of torture and ill-treatment, not only when administered for purposes of political repression, but also when used with the best of intentions to treat a diagnosed mental condition. (...) Harms caused Forced psychiatric interventions cause serious physical and psychic harm, including deaths from the immediate or cumulative effects of treatments. (...) Lavori and Mark Olfson, The Cognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Community Settings, Neuropsychopharmacology 2007 32:244; Linda Andre, Doctors of Deception: What They Don‟t Want You to Know About Shock Treatment (2009). 10 Breggin, Brain Disabling Treatments in Psychiatry, 2d edition (2008); Cohen, A Critique of the Use of Neuroleptic Drugs in Psychiatry, in Fisher and Greenberg eds., From Placebo to Panacea: Putting Psychiatric Drugs to the Test (1997).
Language:English
Score: 1855785.4 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...rsandSurvivorsofPsychiatry.pdf
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THE DEFENCE’S MOTION AND THE PROSECUTOR’S REPLY The Defence Motion of 9 July: The Defendant asserted that "[t] he Prosecution in this case knowingly and intentionally withheld information from the Defence establishing that Witness A - had suffered ‘psychological trauma’ from the time of her captivity on 15 May 1993 at least to the date of the Certificate (11 July 1995); - was under psychiatric care for at least a year and half, from late 1993 until mid-1995; - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, suffered from suppressed memory; - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, was taking prescription drugs; and - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. (...) The Prosecutor’s Reply of 13 July: In its Response, the Prosecution stated that " on 29 June 1998, it provided the Defence with a redacted certificate and statement from a psychologist at the Medica Women’s Therapy Centre in Zenica concerning Witness A and counseling she received at the Centre". According to the Prosecution, these documents "do not relate to or describe any type of clinical psychiatric treatment or any form of psychiatric care" and the Defence was orally notified before the beginning of the trial that "Witness A had visited the Medica center in Zenica".
Language:English
Score: 1855683.2 - https://www.icty.org/fr/press/...l-will-re-open-early-september
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THE DEFENCE’S MOTION AND THE PROSECUTOR’S REPLY The Defence Motion of 9 July: The Defendant asserted that "[t] he Prosecution in this case knowingly and intentionally withheld information from the Defence establishing that Witness A - had suffered ‘psychological trauma’ from the time of her captivity on 15 May 1993 at least to the date of the Certificate (11 July 1995); - was under psychiatric care for at least a year and half, from late 1993 until mid-1995; - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, suffered from suppressed memory; - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, was taking prescription drugs; and - at least during the time she was under psychiatric care, was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. (...) The Prosecutor’s Reply of 13 July: In its Response, the Prosecution stated that " on 29 June 1998, it provided the Defence with a redacted certificate and statement from a psychologist at the Medica Women’s Therapy Centre in Zenica concerning Witness A and counseling she received at the Centre". According to the Prosecution, these documents "do not relate to or describe any type of clinical psychiatric treatment or any form of psychiatric care" and the Defence was orally notified before the beginning of the trial that "Witness A had visited the Medica center in Zenica".
Language:English
Score: 1855683.2 - https://www.icty.org/fr/node/1971
Data Source: un
The process of dissemination of good practices is supported by promoting effects of anti-stigma programmes that work mostly through project activities, with a focus on training activities involving coordinated care and occupational therapy, and include a large number of mental health professionals. (...) At the secondary and tertiary level, mental health care is provided in the following institutions: the Department of Psychiatry of the University Clinical Center of the Republika Srpska plc., the Clinical Psychiatric Hospital Sokolac plc., the Special Hospital of Chronic Psychiatrics of Modrica, the Department of Neuropsychiatry of the Clinical Hospital of Gradiska plc., the Department of Psychiatry of the "Sveti Apostol Luka" Clinical Hospital of Doboj, the Psychiatric Department of the "Dr. (...) The new approach to mentally ill persons has shifted to shorter stays in psychiatric hospitals during acute or deteriorated conditions, in terms of rehabilitation, re-socialization and reintegration during remission.
Language:English
Score: 1849680.9 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...ments/Issues/ESCR/SDG/BiH.docx
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