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Second, Canada argued, relying on the Appellate Body report in US — Washing Machines , that a “pattern” identified by the investigating authority may only include export prices to purchasers, regions or time periods which “differ significantly” because they are significantly lower relative to export price to other purchasers, regions or time periods. In Canada's view, the USDOC acted inconsistently with Article 2.4.2 because the pattern it identified included export prices to purchasers, regions or time periods which differed significantly because they were significantly higher relative to export prices to other purchasers, regions or time periods. (...) The Panel rejected this aspect of Canada's claim, finding that the relevant pattern could include export price to purchasers, regions or time periods “which differ significantly” because they are significantly higher (and not just significantly lower) relative to export prices to other purchasers, regions or time periods.
Language:English
Score: 700210.64 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr..._e/dispu_e/cases_e/ds534_e.htm
Data Source: un
Payments of such fees are simply purchases of services. Purchases and sales of foreign currency 3.55 Foreign currency is a financial asset. (...) The purchaser may use a credit card. The seller may extend credit to the purchaser, or the seller may arrange for a third party, some kind of financial institution, to extend credit to the purchaser. (...) The time of acquisition is the time the hire purchase contract is signed and the purchaser takes possession of the durable.
Language:English
Score: 699232.67 - https://www.ilo.org/public/eng...reau/stat/download/cpi/ch3.pdf
Data Source: un
As a natural consequence, the domestic market of Greece has been directly affected in view of the low export prices for the purchase of Greek raisins. This fact has already been mentioned in 1949 when the decline in question exceeded 50%of the price paid until then by the export trade for purchases of sultanas. In view of the existing disparity between the purchasing power of the drachma and the rate of exchange, the cost of Greek raisins is particularly high, as compared with prices paid on con- sumption markets. (...) It is more than certain that such a subsidy would forthwith paralyse the trade in Greek raisins where purchases have not yet been made andimports are, at most, limited to small purchases effected only to meet the urgent consumption needs, though the import season is already fairly advanced.
Language:English
Score: 698749.95 - https://www.wto.org/gatt_docs/English/SULPDF/90080001.pdf
Data Source: un
In September, the first tranche of AVAT-purchased vaccines began rolling out to 39 countries. (...) John Nkengasong, Director of the Africa CDC. Vaccines purchased under Saving Lives and Livelihoods build on  a historic agreement  negotiated by the African Vaccine Acquisition Trust (AVAT) earlier this year for the purchase of 400 million Johnson & Johnson vaccines as well as  a more recent agreement  for the purchase of 50 million Moderna vaccines. The Mastercard Foundation will fund the purchase of 57 million Johnson & Johnson vaccines and is seeking to purchase approximately 17 million Moderna vaccines.
Language:English
Score: 698396.6 - https://www.unicef.org/press-r...ves-and-livelihoods-initiative
Data Source: un
Finally, using cash-based approaches preserves dignity, builds resilience and increases accountability to affected populations. LOCAL PURCHASES Local purchases are another instrument which may be used to achieve humanitarian and development goals. (...) The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has started local procurement programs in refugee camps in the Sudan, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Namibia and Pakistan as part of durable solutions. With the Purchase for Progress (P4P) initiative, the World Food Programme is using purchasing power and its expertise in logistics and food quality to build resilience among smallholder farmers. (...) Through support for smallholder farmers based on procurement programs, FAO is also promoting food security and resilience through programs such as Purchase from Africans for Africa (PAA) in Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger and Senegal.
Language:English
Score: 697549.4 - https://www.unocha.org/sites/u...tarian%20Segement%20Brazil.doc
Data Source: un
An aircraft operator meets its offsetting requirements by purchasing and surrendering a number of eligible emissions units equivalent to the offsetting requirements; each eligible emissions unit corresponds to one tonne of CO2 emissions reduction generated by an eligible programme under CORSIA. (...) To fulfil the offsetting requirements of an aircraft operator, eligible emissions units purchased need to be surrendered. It is your task now to review the information on surrendered emissions units by the Aircraft Operator A1 and to assess if Aircraft Operator A1 fulfilled its offsetting requirements for the given year. (...) # Transaction Quantity of Units Identification Numbers Notes 1 Purchase 2 3455-3456 2 Purchase 7 4587-4593 3 Sell 4 4590-4593 4 Surrender 1 4587 5 Purchase 6 1111-1116 6 Sell 2 1112; 3455 7 Surrender 1 4588 8 Purchase 3 3661-3663 9 Surrender 1 3456 10 Surrender 2 3662; 3663 11 Purchase 20 2746-2765 12 Surrender 9 2746-2754 13 Surrender 14 1111; 1113-1116; 2755-2763 b) Did Aircraft Operator A1 meet its offsetting requirements for 2024?
Language:English
Score: 697408.3 - https://www.icao.int/environme...rative%20Exercise%204_V05.docx
Data Source: un
An aircraft operator meets its offsetting requirements by purchasing and surrendering a number of eligible emissions units equivalent to the offsetting requirements; each eligible emissions unit corresponds to one tonne of CO2 emissions reduction generated by an eligible programme under CORSIA. (...) To fulfil the offsetting requirements of an aircraft operator, eligible emissions units purchased need to be surrendered. It is your task now to review the information on surrendered emissions units by the Aircraft Operator A1 and to assess if Aircraft Operator A1 fulfilled its offsetting requirements for the given year. (...) # Transaction Quantity of Units Identification Numbers Notes 1 Purchase 2 3455-3456 2 Purchase 7 4587-4593 3 Sell 4 4590-4593 4 Surrender 1 4587 5 Purchase 6 1111-1116 6 Sell 2 1112; 3455 7 Surrender 1 4588 8 Purchase 3 3661-3663 9 Surrender 1 3456 10 Surrender 2 3662; 3663 11 Purchase 20 2746-2765 12 Surrender 9 2746-2754 13 Surrender 14 1111; 1113-1116; 2755-2763 b) Did Aircraft Operator A1 meet its offsetting requirements for 2024?
Language:English
Score: 697408.3 - https://www.icao.int/Meetings/...0Group%20Exercise%204_V04.docx
Data Source: un
An aircraft operator meets its offsetting requirements by purchasing and surrendering a number of eligible emissions units equivalent to the offsetting requirements; each eligible emissions unit corresponds to one tonne of CO2 emissions reduction generated by an eligible programme under CORSIA. (...) To fulfil the offsetting requirements of an aircraft operator, eligible emissions units purchased need to be surrendered. It is your task now to review the information on surrendered emissions units by the Aircraft Operator A1 and to assess if Aircraft Operator A1 fulfilled its offsetting requirements for the given year. (...) # Transaction Quantity of Units Identification Numbers Notes 1 Purchase 2 3455-3456 2 Purchase 7 4587-4593 3 Sell 4 4590-4593 4 Surrender 1 4587 5 Purchase 6 1111-1116 6 Sell 2 1112; 3455 7 Surrender 1 4588 8 Purchase 3 3661-3663 9 Surrender 1 3456 10 Surrender 2 3662; 3663 11 Purchase 20 2746-2765 12 Surrender 9 2746-2754 13 Surrender 14 1111; 1113-1116; 2755-2763 b) Did Aircraft Operator A1 meet its offsetting requirements for 2024?
Language:English
Score: 697408.3 - https://www.icao.int/environme...rative%20Exercise%204_V05.docx
Data Source: un
VII Chapter I Global economic outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Global growth prospects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The growth outlook in a pandemic world . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Inequality between countries is widening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The pandemic is far from over . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Vaccine inequities remain a formidable challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Rising inflation is emerging as a new risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Employment, poverty and inequality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Labour markets are lagging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Poverty to remain at a decade high amid rising inequalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 International trade, investment and financial markets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Demand recovery has buoyed international trade and commodity prices . . . . . . . . . 18 Global investment rebounds but structural challenges lie ahead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Global financial conditions remain highly accommodative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 A changing policy landscape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Fiscal asymmetries are shaping recovery and development prospects . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Gearing up labour market policies and social protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Monetary policy: overcoming the addiction to easy money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Multilateralism in a world of crises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Chapter II The monetary policy response to COVID-19: direct impacts and spillovers . 47 The global monetary response to COVID-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Interest rate measures and reserve policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Expanded lending and foreign exchange operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Forward guidance and asset purchase programmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 XXII WORLD ECONOMIC SITUATION AND PROSPECTS 2022 Page Central banks’ large-scale asset purchase programmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Mechanism and transmission channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Asset purchase programmes in developed economies: the trillion-dollar bazooka . . 53 Asset purchase programmes in developing countries: a paradigm shift in monetary policy?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Have asset purchase programmes met their objectives? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Stabilizing markets during financial turmoil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Fostering economic recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Providing longer-term support to economic growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Side effects and risks of large-scale asset purchase programmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Macroeconomic effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Distributional effects: making the rich richer? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Spillover effects on developing countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 The bumpy road ahead: looking beyond asset purchase programmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Challenges in unwinding unconventional monetary policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 The need for complementary policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Chapter III Regional developments and outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Developed economies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Australia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Europe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Economies in transition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Commonwealth of Independent States and Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 South-Eastern Europe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Developing economies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 East Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 South Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Western Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Latin America and the Caribbean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 XXIIITABLE OF CONTENTS PagePage Boxes I.1 The COVID-19 crisis: an opportunity for information and communications technology and digitally enabled services in small island developing States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 I.2 Strengthening the impact of Special Drawing Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 II.1 Transmission channels of asset purchase programmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 II.2 Backstopping sovereign bond markets via quantitative easing – the special case of the euro area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 II.3 Greening asset purchase programmes to mitigate climate risks . . . . . . . . . 70 III.1 Sustainable finance in the Commonwealth of Independent States and Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 III.2 The quantity and quality of economic growth fosters poverty reduction in Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 III.3 Fiscal policy and financing options to build forward better . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 III.4 The anatomy of the Lebanese financial crisis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 III.5 Healing from the pandemic: the impact of COVID-19 on labour markets in Latin America and the Caribbean and policies to promote a transformative recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Boxes: figures I.1.a Evolution of global exports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 II.3.a Sector shares of the market portfolio, ECB holdings and emissions . . . . . . 71 III.1.a Green bond issuance in the CIS and Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 III.2.a Poverty headcount rate and annual GDP growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 III.2.b Depth of poverty in Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 III.3.a Gross financing needs in selected East and South Asian countries . . . . . . . 122 III.4.a The structure of Lebanese public debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 III.4.b The composition of Lebanese GDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 III.5.a Latin America and the Caribbean’s labour force participation rate by gender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 III.5.b People in formal and informal employment and total employed, first quarter of 2019 to fourth quarter of 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 XXIV WORLD ECONOMIC SITUATION AND PROSPECTS 2022 Page Figures I.1 Change from 2019 average gross domestic product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 I.2 GDP per capita losses by development status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 I.3 Number of doses per 100 people . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 I.4 Share of monthly COVID-19 related deaths by development status . . . . . . . 7 I.5 Fiscal stimulus and changes in working hours, 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 I.6 Growth in job openings and hires in the United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 I.7 Labour market slack in selected European Union countries, second quarter of 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 I.8 Global number of people living in extreme poverty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 I.9 Change in the number of people living in extreme poverty in developing countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 I.10 World merchandise trade, by volume, January 2018 to September 2021 . . . 19 I.11 Growth in services exports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 I.12 International tourist arrivals and tourism receipts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 I.13 Major commodity prices, January 2018 to September 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 I.14 Annual investment growth in selected developed economies, by asset type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 I.15 Annual investment growth in selected developing and transition economies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 I.16 Portfolio flows to emerging market economies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 I.17 Ten-year government bond yields in selected developed economies . . . . . . 32 I.18 General government gross debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 I.19 External debt stock as a share of gross national income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 I.20 Central bank interest rate decisions, 2020 and 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 I.21 Public and publicly guaranteed external debt, by creditor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 II.1 Central bank policy rates in developed and developing countries . . . . . . . . 49 II.2 Balance sheets of major developed country central banks . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 II.3 Euro area GDP-weighted sovereign yields and ICE swap rates . . . . . . . . . . . 57 II.4 Annual growth in non-residential fixed investment in equipment and machinery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 II.5 Stock buy-backs in the United States and the financing tools of firms that bought back stock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 II.6 Base money in selected major developed economies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 II.7 Reserves of depository institutions and growth of total loans in the United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 II.8 Asset valuation changes and asset composition in the United States and Europe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 II.9 Income and asset composition in the United States and Europe . . . . . . . . . 73 II.10 Growth of wealth across income groups in the United States . . . . . . . . . . . 74 II.11 Capital flows to G20 developing countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 III.1 The contribution of demand components to GDP growth in the United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 III.2 Labour market indicators in the United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 XXVTABLE OF CONTENTS PagePage III.3 Inflation trends in Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 III.4 Economic sentiment indicator for the European Union and the euro area . 89 III.5 Annual change in the Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices for select European . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 III.6 Gross public debt-to-GDP ratio for select European countries . . . . . . . . . . . 92 III.7 Changes in benchmark monetary policy rates in the CIS and Georgia since January 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 III.8 Real GDP growth in Africa by subregion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 III.9 Real GDP in Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 III.10 COVID-19 vaccination rates by world region (as of 20 December 2021) . . . . 105 III.11 Government borrowing as a share of GDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 III.12 Demand-side contributions to growth in select East Asian countries . . . . . 116 III.13 Vaccination progress in East Asia (as of 20 December 2021) . . . . . . . . . . . 117 III.14 Inflation and inflation targets in East Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 III.15 Growth of real GDP from 2019 to 2022, based on projections made in 2022 and 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 III.16 South Asia’s vaccination progress (as of 20 December 2021) . . . . . . . . . . . 128 III.17 GDP growth in select South Asian countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 III.18 Public debt over GDP in select South Asian countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 III.19 Recovery forecast for Western Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 III.20 Vaccination progress in Western Asia (as of 20 December 2021) . . . . . . . . 136 III.21 Vaccination progress in Latin America and the Caribbean (as of 20 December. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 III.22 Unemployment rates in select Latin American countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 III.23 Central bank policy rates in select Latin American countries . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Tables I.1 Growth of world output and gross domestic product, 2020-2023 . . . . . . . . 4 II.1 Changes in quarterly gross fixed capital formations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 XXVI WORLD ECONOMIC SITUATION AND PROSPECTS 2022 Page Statistical annex Country classifications A Developed economies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 B Economies in transition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 C Developing economies by region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 D Fuel-exporting countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 E Economies by per capita GNI in July 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 F Least developed countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 G Heavily indebted poor countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 H Small island developing States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 I Landlocked developing countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 J International Organization for Standardization of Country Codes . . . . . . . 159 Annex tables A.1 Developed economies: rates of growth of real GDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 A.2 Economies in transition: rates of growth of real GDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 A.3 Developing economies: rates of growth of real GDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 A.4 Growth of world output and gross domestic product by SDG regions . . . . 169 A.5 Developed economies: consumer price inflation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 A.6 Economies in transition: consumer price inflation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 A.7 Developing economies: consumer price inflation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 A.8 Selected economies: real effective exchange rates, broad measurement . 176 A.9 Free market commodity price indices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 A.10 World oil supply and demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 A.11 World trade: Changes in value and volume of exports and imports, by major country group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 A.12 Balance of payments on current accounts, by country or country group, summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 A.13 Net ODA from major sources, by type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 A.14 Total net ODA flows from OECD Development Assistance Committee countries, by type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 A.15 Commitments and net flows of financial resources, by selected multilateral institutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Language:English
Score: 697351.17 - https://www.un.org/development...oads/sites/45/WESP2022_TOC.pdf
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For purchases within the authority of field offices, the Procurement Division plays a normative role in setting policies and providing advisory support. (...) The UN Secretariat Procurement generally conducts purchases beyond these limits and for global acquisition projects. 3. (...) Delivery requirements for purchases are usually specified in the tender documents (ITB, RFP).
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Score: 697351.17 - https://www.un.org/Depts/ptd/frequently-asked-questions
Data Source: un