Home

Results 1 - 10 of 473,809 for pure-clay-based. Search took 5.028 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
However, imitating Chinese porcelain techniques was no easy feat, especially since the base colour of the raw clay in Basra was yellow and not pure white. However, by applying an opaque white base glaze, the potters could recreate a “blank canvas” on which to experiment spectacularly using blue and white patterns.
Language:English
Score: 1769497.9 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...c-trade-china-basra-and-back-0
Data Source: un
The high plasticity of Mesopotamian clays meant that forming by hand, and on the wheel, were the dominant methods of pottery manufacture in Pre-Islamic times. (...) By contrast, the aplasticity of the Chinese clays gave rise to the development of a variety of shaping techniques. (...) Thus, it seems likely that Basran merchants trading with the Far East facilitated the transmission of Chinese manufacturing practices, either by importing Chinese potters to Basra, or more likely, through describing what they observed there. The pure white surface achieved with the newly invented tin glaze provided an ideal venue for colourful two dimensional design, and soon cobalt blue decoration was being added, creating the affect of "ink on snow."
Language:English
Score: 1604055.1 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...mitation_and_inspiration_0.pdf
Data Source: un
Village of NAKOURA  — Groves on clay soil, frequently nixed with other fruit trees. (...) Also, the trough system of watering, in which the water comes directly into contact with the base of the trunk and the roots, greatly encourages the development of wet-rot, especially in clay soil where the sub-soil is not very permeable. f/- Yield  — In a reasonably kept grove during the maximum productive period (ten to eighteen years) the average annual yield per dunum is estimated at 60 to 70 cases among the Arabs, and 80 to 90 cases among the Israeli. (...) For this reason, the instructions given by the Israeli authorities for the maintenance of Arab plantations, including those classed in the third and fourth categories, are purely formal and inapplicable in very many cases.
Language:English
Score: 1585618.3 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-212091/
Data Source: un
INDUSTRIAL MINERALS DEVELOPMENT : JAMAICA : PROJECT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS / PREPARED FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF JAMAICA BY THE UNITED NATIONS DEPARTMENT OF TECHNICAL CO-OPERATION FOR DEVELOPMENT ACTING AS EXECUTING AGENCY FOR THE UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
Other less pure deposits are - 20 - \ I scattered throughout the island. (...) The MgO content averages about 17.9 per cent or about 4 pe~ cent less than pure dolomite, only a minor drawback for most applications. (...) Carbonate resources should be explored, especially high grade plus 99 per cent pure limestone in the remaining third of Jamaica. 2.
Language:English
Score: 1491846 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...n&DS=DP/UN/JAM/82/008/1&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
The Hejia Village hoard (a hidden stock or store of coins and/or other valuable objects) refers to a vast collection of over 1,000 wares which were stored in two large clay vases and one smaller silver vase sometime in the 8th century CE. (...) Of the many vessels contained within the larger vases, 46 were silver medicine containers labelled with their weight and contents. Other purely decorative gold and silver vessels combined aesthetic elements from Chinese and Iranian art in ways similar to those seen on the surviving murals at Panjakent, a Sogdian city in what is today Tajikistan, which depict scenes from daily life along the trade routes. (...) For example, one gilt silver cup from the hoard has a number of clearly identifiable Sogdian features including eight lobes (divided into 8 exterior sections), a pearl border trim along its base, and a thumb ring attached to a triangular medallion with a deer on it.
Language:English
Score: 1482153.9 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...fluences-reflected-wares-hejia
Data Source: un
FERTILIZERS IN EAST AFRICA
The others are above 5 kg per 1 kg of pure nutrients. As a rule, rice is one of those crops which give low responses to fertilizer (see Table 1). 38 37 36 3! (...) TABLE 7 Potential Demand of Fertilizer in East Africa in 1980 1000 ton of :pure nutrients Specification Total Food crops Cash crops lin:: trogen N • 232 Total 1,160 920 240 52. (...) 'It· :ls assumed that the proportions of pure nutri~nts assuDed in Table 12 will hold in 1980. 7 3:.
Language:English
Score: 1412575.2 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...?open&DS=E/CN.14/INR/81&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
From a strong academic basis, Professor Mamo has expanded beyond a purely academic role. Currently adviser to the Ethiopian Minister of Agriculture and state minister, Professor Tekalign has long been a key contributor to the country's food security, soil health and natural resources programs. In 1985, he and a team of experts launched a national project to improve the country's vast clay soils, especially those that get waterlogged and impair crop productivity.
Language:English
Score: 1376844.5 - https://www.fao.org/soils-2015/about/special-ambassadors/en/
Data Source: un
It is the process in which pure forms of nitrogen are converted to ammonium by decomposers or bacteria. (...) After it is produced at shallow levels within the soil, part of it may move downward as a clay-humus complex. In the lower parts of the soil it tends to be less oxygen availability and this lack of oxygen makes it even more difficult for microbes to work on this humus and decompose it further.
Language:English
Score: 1355479.5 - https://www.fao.org/soils-port...ties/biological-properties/en/
Data Source: un
It is the process in which pure forms of nitrogen are converted to ammonium by decomposers or bacteria. (...) After it is produced at shallow levels within the soil, part of it may move downward as a clay-humus complex. In the lower parts of the soil it tends to be less oxygen availability and this lack of oxygen makes it even more difficult for microbes to work on this humus and decompose it further.
Language:English
Score: 1355479.5 - https://www.fao.org/soils-port...ties/biological-properties/ar/
Data Source: un
It is the process in which pure forms of nitrogen are converted to ammonium by decomposers or bacteria. (...) After it is produced at shallow levels within the soil, part of it may move downward as a clay-humus complex. In the lower parts of the soil it tends to be less oxygen availability and this lack of oxygen makes it even more difficult for microbes to work on this humus and decompose it further.
Language:English
Score: 1355479.5 - https://www.fao.org/soils-port...ties/biological-properties/ru/
Data Source: un