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Project list Priority Area 1:  Enhancing equitable, productive and sustainable natural resource management PNG has globally significant natural assets in forestry, fisheries (tuna) and biodiversity. (...) Expected Outcomes Enhanced capacity to monitor, plan and sustainably manage forests and trees Sustainable harvesting of wildlife species through improved customary management Effective measures in place and being implemented that deter and reduce IUU fishing Priority Area 2:  Strengthening resilience for food security and nutrition The StaRS advocates that PNG chooses a development strategy that recognizes the changing global circumstances that highlights the fragility of the global ecosystems and places additional value on the environment, climate security, food and water security, and it states that “ this approach is smarter even from a pure economic sense ”. Expected Outcomes Development planning and decision making to strengthen resilience in PNG food systems and enhance food and nutrition security is based on sound evidence Improved planning and delivery of food security support services Greater gender equality and women’s empowerment in agriculture to enhance child nutrition and family food security Priority Area 3:  Sustainable and inclusive economic development and job creation in rural areas With 87 percent of PNG’s population located in rural areas, a population growth rate of 3.1 percent and over 50 percent of the population aged below 24 years, sustainably improving the income generating potential of the agriculture (forestry and fisheries) sector will be critical for providing inclusive economic opportunities particularly for the growing population’s youthful cohort.
Language:English
Score: 1012035.7 - https://www.fao.org/papua-new-...ea/programmes-and-projects/fr/
Data Source: un
Project list Priority Area 1:  Enhancing equitable, productive and sustainable natural resource management PNG has globally significant natural assets in forestry, fisheries (tuna) and biodiversity. (...) Expected Outcomes Enhanced capacity to monitor, plan and sustainably manage forests and trees Sustainable harvesting of wildlife species through improved customary management Effective measures in place and being implemented that deter and reduce IUU fishing Priority Area 2:  Strengthening resilience for food security and nutrition The StaRS advocates that PNG chooses a development strategy that recognizes the changing global circumstances that highlights the fragility of the global ecosystems and places additional value on the environment, climate security, food and water security, and it states that “ this approach is smarter even from a pure economic sense ”. Expected Outcomes Development planning and decision making to strengthen resilience in PNG food systems and enhance food and nutrition security is based on sound evidence Improved planning and delivery of food security support services Greater gender equality and women’s empowerment in agriculture to enhance child nutrition and family food security Priority Area 3:  Sustainable and inclusive economic development and job creation in rural areas With 87 percent of PNG’s population located in rural areas, a population growth rate of 3.1 percent and over 50 percent of the population aged below 24 years, sustainably improving the income generating potential of the agriculture (forestry and fisheries) sector will be critical for providing inclusive economic opportunities particularly for the growing population’s youthful cohort.
Language:English
Score: 1012035.7 - https://www.fao.org/papua-new-...ea/programmes-and-projects/en/
Data Source: un
Another initiative directed at preserving the natural environment includes judicious waste collection. To circumvent the utilization of waste burning and indiscriminate landfill dumping, Daegu conducts separate garbage collection, supported by segregation of waste for recycling and regulation on the use of purely disposable products. 6.3 Dimension: Society and Culture The third dimension of the U4SSC KPIs delves into the impact of ICTs in improving equity, governance, information flow and public participation.
Language:English
Score: 1011820.4 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...a/files/basic-html/page59.html
Data Source: un
It does not cover criminal or administrative litigation, or purely domestic litigation. These limitations on scope are due to the legal basis of the proposal, which is Article 81(2) TFEU. Within these limitations, however, it was nevertheless possible to define the scope of applicability broadly. 2 First, the proposed Directive has a broad personal scope: it covers natural and legal persons; journalists, human rights defenders and others. (...) The proposed Directive protects broadly natural and legal persons on account of their engagement in public participation on a matter of public interest – and the definition of “matters of public interest” specifically refers to environment and climate.
Language:English
Score: 1011079.7 - https://unece.org/sites/defaul...2C%20European%20Commission.pdf
Data Source: un
Themes Festivals Documentary Heritage Intangible Cultural Heritage Languages and Endangered Languages Movable Heritage and Artefacts Traditional Craftsmanship Underwater Heritage World Cultural Heritage World Natural Heritage, Biosphere Reserves and Geoparks In Action Cities Institutions Museums Publications Knowledge Bank Countries Silk Roads Photo Contest UnescoLogo_AI Building peace in the minds of men and women Search English English Français Русский العربية 中文 Español Gold ingot © Tang West Market Museum This gold ingot weighs “Fifty Liang” and has a seal of “Yong Le” region; casted by the Ming Dynasty Silver Coin Casting Bureau, it is a rather rare product. The engraved words are as follows: “the seventh year of Yong Le April, casted by Silver Coin Casting Bureau, pure gold, weighing fifity Liang”. This gold ingot is extremely important and valuable for cultural and historical study.
Language:English
Score: 1002572.9 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...eritage-and-museums/gold-ingot
Data Source: un
Trading is allowed in the Netherlands but we know of no recorded “pure spectrum” trades. It has been possible in Norway for some time, but Norway isn’t an EU member. (...) Russell Kent-Smith argues that this focus on “pure spectrum” trades under- values the success of spectrum trading. (...) Most markets rely on having stand- ardised tradable units like barrels of oil and Professor Martin Cave says it is partly the idiosyncratic nature of spec- trum which makes it difficult to turn licences into cash.
Language:English
Score: 1001009.6 - https://www.itu.int/osg/spu/st...s/Spectrum_trade_PT_Mar_06.pdf
Data Source: un
Her pioneering discoveries have answered fundamental questions on the geometry, the topology and Hodge structures of complex algebraic varieties. With a naturally inquisitive mind, Prof. Claire Voisin began exploring mathematics from a young age, encouraged by her father. (...) The value of research in pure mathematics is not measured by immediate applications, but it is important particularly in terms of developing new ways of thinking. (...) She recommends that all young women scientists should be ambitious and overlook external perspectives, and hopes that her recognition as a L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science laureate will help encourage more women to pursue mathematics, including pure mathematics. The L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards Each year, the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards celebrates 5 eminent women scientists and their excellence, creativity and intelligence, from each world region (Africa and the Arab States, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America and North America).
Language:English
Score: 1000899.2 - https://en.unesco.org/news/cla...hematics-and-new-ways-thinking
Data Source: un
Myanmar is the only country that currently produces quality teak from natural forests — India, Lao PDR and Thailand have bans on logging in natural forests or on log exports in place. (...) In Thailand, a complete ban on logging in natural forests introduced in 1989 may have contributed to the recovery of natural teak forests, which are reported to have increased by 2.9 million ha, according to FAO's report. (...) "It is difficult to obtain precise figures on teak forest loss, because teak trees do not grow in pure stands in nature. Natural teak forests are mixed deciduous or tropical evergreen forests which have a share of teak of between 4 and 35 percent."
Language:English
Score: 998024.8 - https://www.fao.org/newsroom/d...anted-teak-forests-increase/en
Data Source: un
Improving capacity to respond to food and agricultural threats and emergencies | FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific | Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO.org 中文 english FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific FAO in the region Regional Perspectives News Events Resources Programmes and projects Partners Asia and the Pacific region is prone to a wide range of natural disasters. Transitory shocks cause chronic poverty and hunger, particularly among those with limited coping capacity. (...) The region is prone to a wide range of natural disasters. Transitory shocks cause chronic poverty and hunger, particularly among those with limited coping capacity. (...) The key objectives of this priority area are to facilitate a shift in emphasis from purely emergency response towards broad-based and concerted disaster risk reduction, preparedness and prevention programmes, with emergency response followed up by linking relief and rehabilitation to development (LRRD) to mitigate the long-term impact.
Language:English
Score: 997704.6 - https://www.fao.org/asiapacific/perspectives/emergencies/en/
Data Source: un
Titolo ITU, Geneve, January 23 2007 Technology and service neutrality: a deeper insight Mario Frullone Fondazione Ugo Bordoni ITU, Geneve, January 23 2007 Technology and service neutrality • A wide goal to relax administrative constraints to allow the market place to “naturally select” those systems leading to an optimal usage of radio resources. • This “natural selection” can be accomplished easing a dynamic replacement of services and technologies. • Two basic principles are fostered: service and technology neutrality. (...) ITU, Geneve, January 23 2007 Some further warnings Some risks related to a pure economic approach to frequency trading Spectrum buy-up Spectrum fragmentation Non technological pressure in favor of less spectrum efficient systems Some proper protection of the final user Inertial force against efficient use and innovation ITU, Geneve, January 23 2007 Re-visit Technical Aspects Technology Neutrality Service Neutrality + Preservation of Final User rights Some possible approaches by the regulator TN+SN on restricted freqs/areas TN given interoperable fixed service SN in a technology fixed environment ITU, Geneve, January 23 2007 Technical Solutions Guiding rules to TN Spectrum Quality Benchmark e.g. by means of Generic Radio Modelling Tool Open issues: •Difficult coexistence between different architectures •Difficult coexistence between different duplexing approaches •Need of refined criteria for interference control ITU, Geneve, January 23 2007 FUB research guideline Guiding rules to SN Service Quality Benchmark by means of Generic System Modelling Tool Radio propagation Traffic modeling Network topology Radio Resource Management Quality of service Operational requirements ITU, Geneve, January 23 2007 Concluding: a proper balance Technology and service neutrality may pave the way to spectrum efficiency • Flexibility vs. harmonisation • Technology update vs. fragmentation • Market vs. final user A methodological issue: a gradual and analytical approach should be rigorously preserved.
Language:English
Score: 997041.3 - https://www.itu.int/osg/spu/st...ay_2_Final/frullone_geneve.pdf
Data Source: un