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New guidelines to strengthen disaster risk management for man-made and technological hazards | UNECE Skip to main content Advanced Search   Main navigation About UNECE Executive Secretary Mission Organizational structure Secretariat Executive Committee Commission Legal instruments Work with us Our work Economic Cooperation & Integration Environmental Policy Forests Housing & Land Population Sustainable Energy Statistics Trade Transport Themes High-impact Areas Circular Economy Gender SPECA Technical cooperation THE PEP UN SG's Special Envoy for Road Safety UN Road Safety Fund UN cooperation in the UNECE region Regional Forum on Sustainable Development SDGs Open UNECE Events Meetings & Events Information for Delegates Coronavirus Advisory Publications Media Executive Secretary's Blog News Press Releases Covid-19 Press Releases Speeches Stories UNECE Weekly Videos More options New guidelines to strengthen disaster risk management for man-made and technological hazards New guidelines to strengthen disaster risk management for man-made and technological hazards Environment Education for Sustainable Development Industrial Accidents Convention 03 December 2018 Man-made and technological disasters, whether caused by natural or man-made hazards, can cause severe damage to individuals, communities, economies, supply chains and the environment. (...) Industrial facilities, nuclear and other technological installations and transport systems are all vulnerable to natural hazards, and their design is not always adequate to withstand current or future impacts. In purely economic terms, the cost of natural and man-made disasters worldwide has been estimated at US$ 175 billion for 2016 alone, with US$ 9 billion of that stemming from man-made disasters.
Language:English
Score: 898330.1 - https://unece.org/media/enviro...ainable-Development/press/1392
Data Source: un
Trends in adolescent motherhood and fertility and related inequalities in the Caribbean 1990-2010 | Publication | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Publications » Trends in adolescent motherhood and fertility and related inequalities in the Caribbean 1990-2010 Available in: English Trends in adolescent motherhood and fertility and related inequalities in the Caribbean 1990-2010 August 2016 | ECLAC Series » Population and Development Population and development Author: Nam, Valerie E. (...) Editorial: ECLAC August 2016 Download Publication pdf Description The study is a purely descriptive analysis of the trends in adolescent fertility and an assessment of reproductive inequalities in a defined area of the Caribbean region, over the twenty year period 1990-2010 The main data sources used are the decennial censuses of population and housing, the system of vital registration and relevant specialised surveys. (...) Search publications See publications list Topics Fertility and reproductive health Sexual and reproductive rights Youth Related Content Briefing note Motherhood and adolescent fertility in the Caribbean Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 898330.1 - https://www.cepal.org/en/publi...related-inequalities-caribbean
Data Source: un
The monetary crisis, dollarization and the exchange rate | Publication | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Publications » The monetary crisis, dollarization and the exchange rate Available in: English The monetary crisis, dollarization and the exchange rate August 1993 | Regular Publications, Reviews and Bulletins » CEPAL Review Economic development Author: Batista, Paulo Nogueira UN symbol.: LC/G.1767-P p. 93-108 August 1993 Download Publication pdf Description The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the debate on stabilization policies in conditions of high inflation in the light of the experience of Brazil and some other countries, especially the European monetary crises of the 1920s and the stabilization of the Argentine currency in 1991/1992. (...) It is asserted that in certain circumstances stabilization can lead to regression to a more primitive type of monetary system, namely the abandonment of pure flat money based exclusively on authorization and sanction by the State. (...) Search publications See publications list Topics Structural heterogeneity Inflation CEPAL Review no.50 Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 898330.1 - https://www.cepal.org/en/publi...ollarization-and-exchange-rate
Data Source: un
Why the rich always stay rich (no matter what, no matter the cost) | Publication | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Publications » Why the rich always stay rich (no matter what, no matter the cost) Available in: English Español Why the rich always stay rich (no matter what, no matter the cost) December 2020 | Regular Publications, Reviews and Bulletins » CEPAL Review Economic development Social development Author: Palma, José Gabriel UN symbol.: LC/PUB.2021/4-P p. 93-132; grafs. (...) Because this relates to the political sphere, there are no purely logical solutions to the conflict, but rather options in a scenario of multiple equilibria. (...) COVID-19 and the socioeconomic crisis in Latin America and the Caribbean Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 898330.1 - https://www.cepal.org/en/publi...y-rich-matter-what-matter-cost
Data Source: un
We believe that defining its scope and application is purely legal question and should not be burdened by political considerations which are unavoidable within the Sixth Committee. (...) Although some elements of the scope and application of the universal jurisdiction as they appear in the Informal paper have been agreed upon, there are still many differences among States on key aspects such as issues of customary nature of universal jurisdiction, in absentia trials and so on. (...) The Commission can dedicate more time for its consideration and use its knowledge from other studies that have relevance to this topic. Furthermore, by its nature the ILC can hardly be labelled as political and therefore any outcome of its work might enable to advance discussions on those aspects where differences among States prevail.
Language:English
Score: 898330.1 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...sal_jurisdiction/czech_rep.pdf
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Themes Festivals Documentary Heritage Intangible Cultural Heritage Languages and Endangered Languages Movable Heritage and Artefacts Traditional Craftsmanship Underwater Heritage World Cultural Heritage World Natural Heritage, Biosphere Reserves and Geoparks In Action Cities Institutions Museums Publications Knowledge Bank Countries Silk Roads Photo Contest UnescoLogo_AI Building peace in the minds of men and women Search English English Français Русский العربية 中文 Español Gold Buckle © The National Museum of Korea Consisting of 53.6 grams of gold, it has a large dragon in the center surrounded by six smaller dragons. (...) This belt buckle made of pure gold is decorated with the granulation technique and features gold wire filigree around the edge.
Language:English
Score: 896516.2 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...ritage-and-museums/gold-buckle
Data Source: un
Themes Festivals Documentary Heritage Intangible Cultural Heritage Languages and Endangered Languages Movable Heritage and Artefacts Traditional Craftsmanship Underwater Heritage World Cultural Heritage World Natural Heritage, Biosphere Reserves and Geoparks In Action Cities Institutions Museums Publications Knowledge Bank Countries Silk Roads Photo Contest UnescoLogo_AI Building peace in the minds of men and women Search English English Français Русский العربية 中文 Español Imitation and inspiration: the ceramic trade from China to Basra and back Until recently, Basra was not considered as a producer of some of the finest Chinese-inspired porcelain. (...) However, imitating Chinese porcelain techniques was no easy feat, especially since the base colour of the raw clay in Basra was yellow and not pure white. However, by applying an opaque white base glaze, the potters could recreate a “blank canvas” on which to experiment spectacularly using blue and white patterns.
Language:English
Score: 896516.2 - https://en.unesco.org/silkroad...c-trade-china-basra-and-back-0
Data Source: un
Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs) Industry Business & Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD (BIAC) Chemindustry.com - Worldwide search engine of the Chemical Industry and related industries CropLife International European Chemical Industry Council (CEFIC) International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) ICMM International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM) World Business Council for Sustainable Development Labour International Confederation of Free Trade Unions International Federation of Chemical, Energy, Mining and General Workers Unions (ICEM) International Metalworkers' Federation (IMF) International Transport Workers' Federation (ITF) Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco and Allied Workers' Associations (IUF) IUF-Global Pesticides Project Occupational Health and Safety Research Institute (IRSST) Public Interest Asociación Argentina de Médicos por el Medio Ambiente Chemicals Health Monitor (HEAL, Brussels, Belgium) EarthAction Network Earthwatch International Friends of the Earth Greepeace International The Greens-International Homepage International Society of Doctors for the Environment The International POP's Elimination Network (IPEN) Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Asia Pesticide Action Network's (PAN's) online Pesticide Database Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Europe Pesticide Action Network (PAN) North America World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Science International Union of Pharmacology International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) 1 2 3 4 Next page » IFCS: Links of Interest Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs) Intergovernmental Organizations (IGOs) Conventions Other You are here: Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety Quick Links Sitemap Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety Officers National focal points Forum standing committee Regional groups IFCS champions Forum sessions Financing work programme Publications Resources Contact IFCS Meetings calendar Links © WHO 2022
Language:English
Score: 896516.2 - https://www.who.int/ifcs/links/en/
Data Source: un
Susceptibility to marginalization in participatory processes | UNESCO Inclusive Policy Lab Skip to main content UNESCO Inclusive Policy Lab Menu Inclusive Policy Markers Learning E-teams Member search Think pieces Publications Podcasts Expert advice Invite a friend Work by region Quick links About the Lab About the MOST Programme Stay connected           UNESCO.org Log in User login Username or e-mail * Password * Create new account Request new password You are here: Home » Inclusive Policy Markers » Inclusive Policy Markers » Participatory » Transformative participation » Susceptibility to marginalization in participatory processes Susceptibility to marginalization in participatory processes Join Register Ask an expert Explore the inclusive policy markers Join an e-team Invite a friend Step 1 Select a dimension of ex/inclusion Open Multidimensional Relational Intersecting risks and drivers Dynamic Multi-layered and contextual Participatory Selected: Participatory When it comes to inclusion, participation covers the issues of active citizenship, nature of authority and public confidence in state institutions, the role of individuals or groups in public life, and power relations. (...) This last points is of particular relevance in the case of emerging and forming agendas – such as inclusive development or climate change adaptation – as this work is often not only of a technical nature but goes hand-in-hand with concerns of public acceptance and/or uptake of the new measures.     (...) Step 2 Select an Inclusive Policy Marker Open Deep procedural improvements Transformative participation Selected: Transformative participation Participation may not be enough, if run in a purely tokenistic manner. From the very outset, inclusive interventions are mindful of possible limitations of participatory techniques and strive to level the field amongst unequal, in this given set-up, participants.
Language:English
Score: 895784 - https://en.unesco.org/inclusivepolicylab/taxonomy/term/215
Data Source: un
Susceptibility to marginalization in participatory processes | UNESCO Inclusive Policy Lab Skip to main content UNESCO Inclusive Policy Lab Menu Inclusive Policy Markers Learning E-teams Member search Think pieces Publications Podcasts Expert advice Invite a friend Work by region Quick links About the Lab About the MOST Programme Stay connected           UNESCO.org Log in User login Username or e-mail * Password * Create new account Request new password You are here: Home » Inclusive Policy Markers » Inclusive Policy Markers » Participatory » Transformative participation » Susceptibility to marginalization in participatory processes Susceptibility to marginalization in participatory processes Join Register Ask an expert Explore the inclusive policy markers Join an e-team Invite a friend Step 1 Select a dimension of ex/inclusion Open Multidimensional Relational Intersecting risks and drivers Dynamic Multi-layered and contextual Participatory Selected: Participatory When it comes to inclusion, participation covers the issues of active citizenship, nature of authority and public confidence in state institutions, the role of individuals or groups in public life, and power relations. (...) This last points is of particular relevance in the case of emerging and forming agendas – such as inclusive development or climate change adaptation – as this work is often not only of a technical nature but goes hand-in-hand with concerns of public acceptance and/or uptake of the new measures.     (...) Step 2 Select an Inclusive Policy Marker Open Deep procedural improvements Transformative participation Selected: Transformative participation Participation may not be enough, if run in a purely tokenistic manner. From the very outset, inclusive interventions are mindful of possible limitations of participatory techniques and strive to level the field amongst unequal, in this given set-up, participants.
Language:English
Score: 895784 - https://en.unesco.org/inclusiv...-marginalization-participatory
Data Source: un