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For example, workers may need to specialize in learning about the different combinations of raw materials that you can use in a printer, or to know how to look at the electronic blueprints to spot defects. (...) And because 3D printing is likely to require fewer raw materials and create less waste, they will probably be greener. (...) I wonder if my host has prepared the meal with Foodini, a USD $ 1,400 3D food printer that can even make ravioli.
Language:English
Score: 1285733.6 - www.ilo.org/moscow/news...WCMS_246168/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
Ingredients only found in ultra-processed products include substances not commonly used in culinary preparations, and additives whose purpose is to imitate sensory qualities of un/minimally-processed foods or of culinary preparations of these foods, or to disguise undesirable sensory qualities of the final product. Raw/minimally-processed foods are a small proportion of or are even absent from ultra-processed products. » « Substances only found in ultra-processed products include some directly extracted from foods, such as casein, lactose, whey, and gluten, and some derived from further processing of food constituents, such as hydrogenated or interesterified oils, hydrolyzed proteins, soy protein isolate, maltodextrin, invert sugar and high fructose corn syrup. (...) The main purpose of industrial ultra-processing is to create products that are ready to eat, to drink or to heat, liable to replace both unprocessed or minimally processed foods that are naturally ready to consume, such as fruits and nuts, milk and water, and freshly prepared drinks, dishes, desserts and meals. Common attributes of ultra-processed products are hyper-palatability, sophisticated and attractive packaging, multi-media and other aggressive marketing to children and adolescents, health claims, high profitability, and branding and ownership by transnational corporations. »   Processed foods: « These are relatively simple products made by adding sugar, oil, salt or other culinary ingredients to raw or minimally-processed foods. (...) The main purpose of the manufacture of processed foods is to increase the durability of raw or minimally-processed foods, or to modify or enhance their sensory qualities.
Language:English
Score: 1285733.6 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/index.php/zh-hans/comment/9250
Data Source: un
Ingredients only found in ultra-processed products include substances not commonly used in culinary preparations, and additives whose purpose is to imitate sensory qualities of un/minimally-processed foods or of culinary preparations of these foods, or to disguise undesirable sensory qualities of the final product. Raw/minimally-processed foods are a small proportion of or are even absent from ultra-processed products. » « Substances only found in ultra-processed products include some directly extracted from foods, such as casein, lactose, whey, and gluten, and some derived from further processing of food constituents, such as hydrogenated or interesterified oils, hydrolyzed proteins, soy protein isolate, maltodextrin, invert sugar and high fructose corn syrup. (...) The main purpose of industrial ultra-processing is to create products that are ready to eat, to drink or to heat, liable to replace both unprocessed or minimally processed foods that are naturally ready to consume, such as fruits and nuts, milk and water, and freshly prepared drinks, dishes, desserts and meals. Common attributes of ultra-processed products are hyper-palatability, sophisticated and attractive packaging, multi-media and other aggressive marketing to children and adolescents, health claims, high profitability, and branding and ownership by transnational corporations. »   Processed foods: « These are relatively simple products made by adding sugar, oil, salt or other culinary ingredients to raw or minimally-processed foods. (...) The main purpose of the manufacture of processed foods is to increase the durability of raw or minimally-processed foods, or to modify or enhance their sensory qualities.
Language:English
Score: 1285733.6 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/zh-hans/comment/9250
Data Source: un
Output 1 (CSIR): Develop an Action Plan to support sustainable transition to alternative material Output 2 (Wits): Strengthened plastics recycling capacity by capacity building activities including integration of the informal collectors sector. 5 Activities under Output 1 • Identification of single-use plastics with opportunities for replacement – Prioritisation for LCA study based on stakeholder rankings – Takeaway container (meal kit i.e., polystyrene clamshell and cup) • Material substitution opportunities for each product – Maintaining product functionality – Commercially available alternatives – Life Cycle sustainability assessment to confirm if alternative provide best social, economic and environmental solution • Assessment of potential to produce alternative materials locally – Natural fibres – Bioplastics (Biobased and compostable) – Reusable non-plastic materials: glass, ceramic and stainless steel • Assessment of available technologies for final treatment of alternative materials • Demonstration of identified technologies/materials • Development of an Action plan 6 Main findings from LCSA for meal kit • Raw material extraction and polymer production contribute most environmental impacts • Polystyrene is the preferred option from eLCA perspective • Compostable plastics, biobased plastics, bagasse and paper are less persistent in the environment than conventional plastics • Polystyrene is 400 times worse than paper in terms of environmental pollution at end of life – Persistence in the environment – Material pollution • Increasing recycling rates of polystyrene meal kits will improve environmental performance by 30% over 5 years • Increased recycling of biobased and compostable alternatives will improve environmental performance by 40% over 5 years. 7 UNIDO funded Biodegradation Testing Laboratory (ISO accreditation in process) at the CSIR • Testing against ASTM/ISO standards. • Biodegradation in different media (compost, soil and aqueous) and time-frames • Verify claims of imported products – biodegradable/compostable/environmentally friendly without any certifications – Oxo-degradable plastics banned in Europe imported to African countries • Dispel popular misconceptions of bioplastics – Biodegradation occurs under specific conditions and is dependent on the structure of the biopolymer. 8 Demonstration of technologies/materials • 3 grades of biopolymers were provided to the CSIR for prototype development – PHBH-151C suitable for flexible product applications – PHBH (X331N and 080X) suitable for injection molding of rigid products • Mechanical and thermal testing of biopolymers completed at the CSIR • Biopolymers mixed with agro-waste and injection molded at local manufacturing facility (MouldPlastics) to form different types of prototypes 9 Output 2: Education & Training for Waste Picker Integration - Activities 1.
Language:English
Score: 1281472.6 - https://www.unido.org/sites/de...se%20study_Final%20updated.pdf
Data Source: un
Following these precautionary measures can help protect yourself, your family and your community from this very serious illness: Avoid contact with poultry that are sick or found dead Report sick or dead poultry immediately to the authorities Slaughter all poultry safely  Clean cutting boards and other utensils with soap and hot water to keep raw poultry from contaminating other foods Cook poultry and poultry products thoroughly (do not eat pink meat, runny eggs or raw duck blood) Wash hands with soap and water before and after handling live poultry Food Safety Food poisoning remains a critical health issue in Viet Nam, causing severe illness and even death. (...) These simple practices help to reduce the risk of food poisoning: Always wash hands after going to the toilet and before and after preparing food When preparing meals keep raw and cooked food separate Cook food thoroughly Keep food at safe temperatures Use only safe water and raw materials Road Safety Over the course of the Tet holiday, millions of people will travel on Viet Nam’s roads to be with family and friends.
Language:English
Score: 1280605.1 - https://www.who.int/vietnam/ne...-of-the-goat-safe-and-healthyy
Data Source: un
AGRICULTURE, EXTERNAL TRADE AND INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATION
Table 1 LATIN AMERICA a AND THE CARIBBEAN: MAIN AGRICULTURAL EXPORT PRODUCTS b Product Coffee, green or roasted and coffee substitutes Oil seed cake and meal Fruit juices and vegetable juices Soya beans (excl. flour) Crustacea and molluscs Wheat Plantains and fresh bananas Soyabean oil Maize (corn) Raw cotton Sugar Fresh meat of bovine animals Tobacco, unmanufactured Wood pulp Cereals, unmilled Other prepared meat Meat meal and fish meal Sunflower seed oil Cocoa beans, raw or roasted Coffee extracts and essences Relative Dosition 1984 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 1970 1 8 38 30 11 10 7 141 5 3 4 2 17 67 14 9 6 37 12 19 % of total asr. 1984 22.4 7.6 5.4 4.9 3.7 3.4 3.2 3.1 2.7 2.5 2.4 2.1 2.1 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.5 1.5 1.3 1.2 exDorts 1970 29.0 2.4 0.3 0.4 1.8 1.9 4.0 0.0 5.2 6.5 5.3 7.5 1.0 0.1 1.4 2.2 4.7 0.3 1.7 0.7 Source: ECL AC, External Trade Data Bank for Latin America and the Caribbean (BADECEL)
Language:English
Score: 1280185.3 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...get?open&DS=LC/G.1492-P&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
The types of co-products included in the study were rest raw materials that arise in the seafood processing industry, and only co-products that did not go to human consumption. (...) Likewise, production of co- products for human consumption could result in higher profit and motivate better handling of co- products than the production of fish meal which requires less careful handling. Another way of increasing the value of the co-products is to make the extraction of muscle from the rest raw material more cost effective. (...) Aksnes, A., & Mundheim, H. (1997). The impact of raw material freshness and processing temperature for fish meal on growth, feed efficiency and chemical composition of Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus).
Language:English
Score: 1277676.2 - https://www.fao.org/flw-in-fis...od-processing-industry-pdf/ru/
Data Source: un
The types of co-products included in the study were rest raw materials that arise in the seafood processing industry, and only co-products that did not go to human consumption. (...) Likewise, production of co- products for human consumption could result in higher profit and motivate better handling of co- products than the production of fish meal which requires less careful handling. Another way of increasing the value of the co-products is to make the extraction of muscle from the rest raw material more cost effective. (...) Aksnes, A., & Mundheim, H. (1997). The impact of raw material freshness and processing temperature for fish meal on growth, feed efficiency and chemical composition of Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus).
Language:English
Score: 1277676.2 - https://www.fao.org/flw-in-fis...od-processing-industry-pdf/es/
Data Source: un
Susan Kevork Nestle Switzerland 13.08.2019 Private Sector intiatives to address food waste : At Nestlé we have estimated our own losses along our entire value chain at 12%.This includes the losses upstream of the raw materials that we buy, and the losses in manufacturing, distribution and at the consumption stage. (...) In 2018, Nestlé UK and Ireland worked with other members of the IGD and WRAP Food Waste Measurement Task and Finish Group to develop guidance on measuring and reporting food loss and waste.Nestlé UK and Irelandalso launched an initiative that aimsto redistribute meals across the UK. Delivered in partnership with Company Shop and WRAP, the Waste Not, Want Not methodology will assess the main causes of food waste within food operations and reduce them at source where possible. By 2019, any surplus food should be redistributed to commercial and charitable organizations rather than being used for animal feed or anaerobic digestion, and the project aims to redistribute 2 million extra meals. The approach has already been tested at several Nestlé factories.
Language:English
Score: 1271406.8 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/comment/9577
Data Source: un
Comment view | المنتدى العالمي المعني بالأمن الغذائي والتغذية تجاوز إلى المحتوى الرئيسي FAO Header menu إطبع إرسال عن المنظمة في ميدان العمل البلدان الموضوعات المطبوعات المطبوعات الإحصائيات الشراكات English Español Français العربية 中文 Русский المنتدى العالمي المعني بالأمن الغذائي والتغذية المنتدى العالمي المعني بالأمن الغذائي والتغذية Main navigation Homepage معلومات أساسية الأنشطة الموارد أخبار أعضاء المنتدى الشركاء السيدة Susan Kevork Nestle سويسرا 13.08.2019 Private Sector intiatives to address food waste : At Nestlé we have estimated our own losses along our entire value chain at 12%.This includes the losses upstream of the raw materials that we buy, and the losses in manufacturing, distribution and at the consumption stage. (...) In 2018, Nestlé UK and Ireland worked with other members of the IGD and WRAP Food Waste Measurement Task and Finish Group to develop guidance on measuring and reporting food loss and waste.Nestlé UK and Irelandalso launched an initiative that aimsto redistribute meals across the UK. Delivered in partnership with Company Shop and WRAP, the Waste Not, Want Not methodology will assess the main causes of food waste within food operations and reduce them at source where possible. By 2019, any surplus food should be redistributed to commercial and charitable organizations rather than being used for animal feed or anaerobic digestion, and the project aims to redistribute 2 million extra meals. The approach has already been tested at several Nestlé factories.
Language:English
Score: 1271406.8 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/ar/comment/9577
Data Source: un