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Nothing in the present Covenant may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms recognized herein or at their limitation to a greater extent than is provided for in the present Covenant. 2. (...) Nothing in this article shall prejudice the trial and punishment of any person for any act or omission which, at the time when it was committed, was criminal according to the general principles of law recognized by the community of nations. (...) The Committee shall be composed of nationals of the States Parties to the present Covenant who shall be persons of high moral character and recognized competence in the field of human rights, consideration being given to the usefulness of the participation of some persons having legal experience. 3.
Language:English
Score: 753046.2 - https://www.un.org/en/genocide...trocity-crimes/Doc.4_iccpr.pdf
Data Source: un
Those whose needs are reflected in the Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development, which include all children, youth, persons with disabilities (of whom more than 80% live in poverty), people living with HIV/AIDS, older persons, indigenous peoples, refugees and internally displaced persons, and all migrants regardless of their migratory status. CELAC Member States recall that in the 2030 Agenda, Member States recognized the importance of age structure for sustainable development. (...) Also, we consider that older persons are right-holders who have contributed and continue to play an active role in the many areas of development, and countries should recognize them as key stakeholders in the formulation of public policies.
Language:English
Score: 752056.4 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...Item3/el-salvador-celac_en.pdf
Data Source: un
“Georgia remains committed to peaceful reconciliation,” he assured, from a firm belief that reconciliation, reintegration and a commitment to a rules-based order and diplomacy are the only means to achieve peace.  “We all recognize the utterly humanitarian nature of the principle of return,” he said, urging delegates to apply that principle to internally displaced persons from Georgia and vote yes on the text. (...) There are a quarter of a million registered internally displaced persons in Georgia, many of whom live in vulnerable conditions.   (...) Canada is encouraged by Georgia’s unilateral efforts to promote humanitarian access to internally displaced persons in the region, he said, urging States to express solidarity with all internally displaced persons by supporting today’s resolution.
Language:English
Score: 752006.4 - https://www.un.org/press/en/2019/ga12151.doc.htm
Data Source: un
Strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations The Economic and Social Council, Reaffirming General Assembly resolution 46/182 of 19 December 1991 and the guiding principles contained in the annex thereto, and recalling other relevant resolutions of the Assembly and relevant resolutions and agreed conclusions of the Economic and Social Council, Reaffirming also the principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence for the provision of humanitarian assistance, and the need for all actors engaged in the provision of humanitarian assistance in situations of complex emergencies, protracted crises and natural disasters to promote and fully respect those principles, Recalling its decision 2019/208 of 11 April 2019, in which it decided that the theme for the humanitarian affairs segment of its 2019 session would be “Promoting action to save lives, reach those in need and reduce humanitarian risk, vulnerability and need: looking towards the seventieth anniversary of the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 and the climate action summit called for by the Secretary-General” and that it would convene two panel discussions under the segment, and a high-level side event focusing on the seventieth anniversary of the Geneva Conventions of 1949, Expressing grave concern at the increasing challenges, in particular in developing countries, caused by the unprecedented number of people affected by disasters and other humanitarian emergencies, which are adding to underdevelopment, poverty and inequality and are increasing the vulnerability of people while reducing their ability to cope with humanitarian emergencies, emphasizing the need for sustained resources for disaster risk reduction, preparedness and humanitarian assistance, including in developing countries, to be provided efficiently and effectively, and emphasizing also the need for development and humanitarian actors to work better together to strengthen resilience, including urban resilience, in terms of prevention, preparedness and response, https://undocs.org/en/E/2019/L.18 https://undocs.org/en/A/RES/46/182 E/RES/2019/14 Strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations 19-11156 2/17 Expressing grave concern also at the unprecedented number of people affected and displaced by humanitarian emergencies, including frequently protracted displacement resulting from humanitarian emergencies, which are increasing in number, scale and severity and are stretching humanitarian response capacities, recognizing the need for burden-sharing, and noting with appreciation efforts at the national and international levels that promote national capacity-building to address complex challenges in this regard, Noting the need for increased awareness of the international community regarding the issue of internal displacement worldwide, including the situation of millions living in protracted situations of displacement, and the urgency of providing adequate humanitarian assistance to and protection for internally displaced persons, supporting host communities, addressing the root causes of displacement at an early stage, finding durable solutions for internally displaced persons in their countries and addressing possible obstacles in this regard, wherein the national authorities have the primary duty and responsibility to provide protection and humanitarian assistance and promote durable solutions for internally displaced persons within their jurisdiction, bearing in mind their particular needs, and recognizing that durable solutions incl ude voluntary return in safety and with dignity, as well as voluntary local integration in the areas to which persons have been displaced or voluntary settlement in another part of the country, without prejudice to the right of internally displaced persons to leave their country or to seek asylum, Recognizing the critical role of host countries and communities, especially developing countries, in addressing the needs of affected populations in humanitarian emergencies, and reiterating the need for timely and coordinated support from the international community to hosts and affected countries to strengthen their development and resilience and strengthen national and local capacities, as appropriate, to address the humanitarian needs of affected populations in accordance with humanitarian principles, Stressing the importance that Member States, the United Nations and other relevant actors continue to make efforts to improve the effectiveness of humanitarian assistance based on needs, including by strengthening humanitarian response capacities, improving humanitarian coordination, improving joint needs assessments, and analysis as appropriate, prioritized, needs-based humanitarian response plans, identifying and integrating appropriate innovation into humanitar ian preparedness, response and recovery, increasing transparency, reducing duplication and management costs, strengthening partnerships with local and national responders as appropriate, enhancing flexible, predictable and adequate funding and strengthenin g the accountability of all stakeholders, Recognizing that developing countries, in particular the least developed countries and small island developing States, remain acutely vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change, the increase in the intensity and frequency of extreme weather and climate-related events, as well as the effects of El Niño and La Niña, environmental degradation and human and economic loss resulting from natural hazards, recognizing also the increase in the intensity and frequency of disasters, which in certain circumstances may contribute to displacement, and recognizing further the need for an improved understanding of the multidimensional nature of disaster and the adverse effects of climate change to effectively manage disast er risk, and for international cooperation, as appropriate, to develop and strengthen their resilience in this regard, including the exchange of information, experiences and best practices among countries, and noting the climate action summit called for by the Secretary-General, to be held in New York in 2019, Strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations E/RES/2019/14 3/17 19-11156 Affirming the need for effective implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030,1 emphasizing that building and strengthening resilience at the local, national and regional levels is critical to reducing the risk and the impact of disasters and vulnerabilities to hazards, and in this regard, while recognizing that building resilience, including through disaster risk reduction and preparedness, is a multidimensional process including both humanitarian and development actors support of long-term development, stressing the need for enhanced investment in building national and local capacities for multi -hazard early warning systems, preparedness, prevention, mitigation, response, recovery and rehabilitation, particularly in developing countries, as well as investment in building regional capacities, Recognizing, in this regard, the particular importance of the Paris Agreement adopted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change,2 Recalling the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 3 and the Additional Protocols thereto of 1977, 4 and the obligation to respect and ensure respect for international humanitarian law in all circumstances, and the obligation of all parties to armed conflict to comply strictly with the obligations applicable to them under international humanitarian law, Reaffirming the continued importance of the Geneva Conventions, in the light of their seventieth anniversary, which include a vital legal framework for the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, including the provision of humanitarian assistance, Recalling the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and the Additional Protocols thereto of 1977 and 2005,5 as applicable, as well as relevant customary international law concerned with the protection of the wounded and sick, medical personnel and humanitarian personnel exclusively engaged in medical duties, their means of transport and equipment, as well as hospitals and other medical facilities, and the obligation of parties to armed conflict to respect and ensure respect for international humanitarian law in all circumstances, and noting the applicable rules of international humanitarian law relating to the non-punishment of any person for carrying out medical activities compatible with medical ethics, Strongly condemning all attacks, threats and other acts of violence against the wounded and sick, medical personnel and humanitarian personnel exclusively engaged in medical duties, their means of transport, equipment and supplies, as well as hospitals and other medical facilities, and deploring the long-term consequences of such attacks for the civilian population and the health-care systems of the countries concerned, Strongly condemning also all attacks, threats and other acts of violence against humanitarian personnel, their facilities, equipment, transports and supplies, and expressing deep concern about the consequences of such attacks for the provision of humanitarian assistance to affected populations, Strongly condemning further all attacks, threats and other acts of violence against civilian objects, in violation of applicable international humanitarian law, Encouraging Member States and relevant humanitarian organizations to work closely with national institutions, including local governments and the private sector, as appropriate, to examine effective, context-specific ways to be better prepared for, __________________ 1 General Assembly resolution 69/283, annex II. 2 See FCCC/CP/2015/10/Add.1, decision 1/CP.21, annex. 3 United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 75, Nos. 970–973. 4 Ibid., vol. 1125, Nos. 17512 and 17513. 5 Ibid., vol. 2404, No. 43425. https://undocs.org/en/A/RES/69/283 https://undocs.org/en/FCCC/CP/2015/10/Add.1 E/RES/2019/14 Strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations 19-11156 4/17 respond to and recover from increasing emergencies in urban areas, which may have an impact on the provision of such life-saving essential services as water, energy and health care, Expressing deep concern at all acts of sexual and gender-based violence, and noting with great concern that violence, including sexual and gender-based violence and violence against children, continues to be deliberately directed against civilian populations in emergency situations and that civilians are the main victims of violations of international humanitarian law committed by parties to armed conflict, recognizing that, while women and girls are disproportionately affected, men and boys can also be victims and/or survivors of sexual and gender-based violence, Recognizing that humanitarian emergencies may disproportionately affect women and girls and that it is essential to ensure that women are empowered to effectively and meaningfully participate in leadership and decision-making processes relevant to such emergencies, including in disaster risk reduction, that the specific needs and interests of women and girls, including for education and health, are identified and safely and adequately addressed in strategies and responses, as appropriate, and that the rights of women and girls are promoted and protected in humanitarian emergencies, Reaffirming that the specific needs and priorities, as well as capacities, of women, girls, men and boys of different ages should be identified, responded to and mainstreamed into humanitarian assistance programming at all stages in a comprehensive and consistent manner, recognizing that in humanitarian emergencies, there are specific and heightened risks to their safety, health and well -being, Noting with grave concern that children and youth continue to lack inclusive and equitable quality education and safe school environments in situations of humanitarian emergencies, recognizing a child’s right to education in emergency situations and that the impact of humanitarian emergencies on education presents development and humanitarian challenges, emphasizing the urgent need for increased financing and more efficient delivery of quality education in humanitarian emergencies, as a contribution towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and promoting lifelong learning opportunities for all, including early childhood education, as well as tertiary education, skills training and vocational education, and in this regard reaffirming that education should pursue a contribution to peace and can act as a catalyst for recovery and rebuilding and creates resilient and robust societies, Recognizing that quality education contributes in multiple ways to building resilience of individuals, communities and institutions to respond to humanitarian emergencies by supporting and strengthening social capital, raising human capital and strengthening community knowledge regarding humanitarian response, and recognizing also that quality education can mitigate the psychosocial impacts of armed conflicts and natural disasters by providing a sense of normalcy, stability, structure and hope for the future, and in this regard emphasizing the important role that education can also play in supporting efforts in emergency situations to prevent and mitigate the impacts of all acts of violence and abuse, Recognizing also the important and positive role of youth in humanitarian assistance, who can be drivers of innovation and creative solutions, and the need to engage them in response efforts, including through volunteer programmes, Recognizing further the risks that older persons face in humanitarian emergencies, that they have years of knowledge, skills and wisdom, which are invaluable assets to reduce disaster risk, and that they should be included in the design Strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations E/RES/2019/14 5/17 19-11156 of policies, plans and mechanisms, including for early warning and for disaster risk reduction, and recognizing also that their particular needs should be taken into account, Recognizing that, in humanitarian emergencies, persons with disabilities are disproportionately affected and face multiple obstacles in accessing humanitarian assistance, recognizing also the need to make humanitarian action accessible to and inclusive of persons with disabilities, in this regard stressing the importance of ensuring non-discrimination, meaningful participation in decision-making processes, as well as cooperation and coordination in the provision of assistance to ensure that their needs are addressed, and in this regard recalling the Charter on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action, Recognizing also the primary role of Member States in preparing for and responding to outbreaks of infectious disease, including those that result in humanitarian crises, highlighting the critical role played by Member States, the World Health Organization as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work, in line with the International Health Regulations (2005) adopted by the World Health Assembly, 6 the United Nations humanitarian system, relevant international and regional organizations, non-governmental organizations, the private sector and other humanitarian actors in providing financial, technical and in -kind support in order to bring epidemics or pandemics under control, and recognizing also the need to strengthen local and national health systems, early reporting and early warning systems, preparedness, cross-sectoral response capacities, and resilience linked to outbreaks of infectious disease, including through capacity-building for developing countries, Noting with great concern that millions of people are experiencing crisis levels of acute food insecurity or worse, and noting that armed conflicts, drought, poverty and volatility of commodity prices are among the factors causing or exacerbating famine and severe food insecurity and that additional efforts, including international support, are urgently needed to address this, Stressing that the international community should provide, in a coordinated manner, support for national and regional efforts by providing the assistance necessary to increase sustainable food production and access to healthy and nutritious food and its utilization, while fully respecting the importance of humanitarian principles for humanitarian assistance, Recognizing that investing, when possible, in risk-informed and responsive social protection systems, protecting livelihoods and providing emergency agriculture support are crucial to saving lives, Recognizing also the clear relationship between emergency response, rehabilitation, reconstruction and development, and reaffirming that, in order to strengthen coherence and ensure a smooth transition from relief to rehabilitation, reconstruction and development, emergency assistance will be provided in ways that will be supportive of recovery and long-term development and that emergency measures should be accompanied by development measures as a step towards the sustainable development of affected States, and in this regard highlighting the importance of closer cooperation between national stakeholders, including the private sector, as appropriate, and humanitarian and development actors, Recognizing further that a cooperative and complementary framework between humanitarian and development approaches is imperative to build resilience, __________________ 6 World Health Organization, document WHA58/2005/REC/1, resolution 58.3, annex. (...) Calls upon all States and parties to comply with the provisions of international humanitarian law, including all of the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, in particular the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, 13 in order to protect and assist civilians in occupied territories, and in this regard urges the international community and the relevant organizations of the United Nations system to strengthen humanitarian assistance to civilians in those situations; 32. Urges all actors engaged in the provision of humanitarian assistance to fully commit to and duly respect the guiding principles contained in the annex to General Assembly resolution 46/182, including the humanitarian principles of humanity, neutrality and impartiality as well as the principle of independence, as recognized by the Assembly in its resolution 58/114 of 17 December 2003; 33.
Language:English
Score: 750676.07 - https://www.unocha.org/sites/unocha/files/E-RES-2019-14.pdf
Data Source: un
The application for recognizing the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication may be submitted by natural or legal persons who, within the geographical area, produce products marked by the name of such geographical area, as well as associations of such natural or legal persons. (...) Revocation of the Decision to Recognize the Status of an Authorized User Article 55 Upon the application of the interested person, the responsible authority may revoke a decision to recognize the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication if it determines that the conditions prescribed by this Law for the recognition of the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication, have ceased to exist. (...) The status of a person inserted in the appropriate register as the authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication shall cease on the first day subsequent to the day the decision to revoke a decision to recognize the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication became final and enforceable.
Language:English
Score: 750386.13 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...c_e/cgr_e/WTACCCGR11_LEG_7.pdf
Data Source: un
The application for recognizing the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication may be submitted by natural or legal persons who, within the geographical area, produce products marked by the name of such geographical area, as well as associations of such natural or legal persons. (...) Revocation of the Decision to Recognize the Status of an Authorized User Article 55 Upon the application of the interested person, the responsible authority may revoke a decision to recognize the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication if it determines that the conditions prescribed by this Law for the recognition of the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication, have ceased to exist. (...) The status of a person inserted in the appropriate register as the authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication shall cease on the first day subsequent to the day the decision to revoke a decision to recognize the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication became final and enforceable.
Language:English
Score: 750386.13 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...e/cgr_e/WTACCCGR24A1_LEG_6.pdf
Data Source: un
The application for recognizing the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication may be submitted by natural or legal persons who, within the geographical area, produce products marked by the name of such geographical area, as well as associations of such natural or legal persons. (...) Revocation of the Decision to Recognize the Status of an Authorized User Article 55 Upon the application of the interested person, the responsible authority may revoke a decision to recognize the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication if it determines that the conditions prescribed by this Law for the recognition of the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication, have ceased to exist. (...) The status of a person inserted in the appropriate register as the authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication shall cease on the first day subsequent to the day the decision to revoke a decision to recognize the status of an authorized user of an appellation of origin or a geographical indication became final and enforceable.
Language:English
Score: 750386.13 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...e/cgr_e/WTACCCGR17A1_LEG_3.pdf
Data Source: un
ICTs in the Service of Persons with Disabilities; Recommendations of the UNESCO Expert Meeting: ICTs in the Service of Persons with Disabilities; 2003 CI/INF/UAP/2003/disabilities Recommendations of the UNESCO Expert Meeting “ICTs in the service of persons with disabilities” 20 – 21 May, 2003 UNESCO Headquarters, Paris We, the participants at the UNESCO Expert Meeting “ICTs in the service of Persons with disabilities” call on UNESCO to take full account of disabled persons in fulfilling its obligations for “advancing the mutual knowledge and understanding of people, through all means of mass communication”, “to promote the free flow of ideas by word and image”, to “maintain, increase and diffuse knowledge”, and “to give fresh impulse to popular education and to the spread of culture.” Furthermore, we recognize the important role of information highways as powerful channels for information creation and exchange, for promoting equitable access to social opportunities, for capacity building and training, and for providing new opportunities for all, including those with disabilities, particularly persons with cognitive/intellectual and multiple disabilities, and call on UNESCO to engage its resources in realizing these opportunities by: Supporting policy measures for achieving equitable access to information, including: • Submitting recommendations to the World Summit on Information Society which • : • a) Incorporate a clear perspective on the needs of persons with disabilities b) Seek to influence copyright and intellectual property rights discussions to ensure that literature and information are made accessible and available to persons with disabilities at the same time as to the non-disabled population at no additional cost. c) Develop mechanisms to overcome access barriers in developing countries such as allocating a percentage of ICT development assistance targeted for developing countries to provide ICTs for persons with disabilities. • Encouraging Member States to develop barrier-free national ICT policies including support for the development of library services for the disabled based on accepted standards, which are inclusive of the needs of persons with disabilities and which assure the rights to freedom of information and communication of persons with disabilities. • • Promoting the provision of ICT services and their benefits in a manner that guarantees universal, full and equitable access, taking into account the linguistic diversity of all social sectors, including the elderly and deaf persons, who use sign language and also other persons with disabilities. • Promoting universal design and universal service regulations in the provision of telecommunication services, including recognizing diverse communication needs of persons with disabilities which may include the use of voice, text, data and video. • Promoting the development of a global information network for exchanging, documenting and disseminating resources and best practices, and addressing the information needs of persons with disabilities. • Ensuring that technological transitions expand the range of persons benefiting from these changes rather than marginalizing current users. • Facilitating surveys and studies on public, corporate and voluntary initiatives, laws, policies and regulations with a view to supporting development of indicators and effective evidence-based policies for protecting and promoting the freedom of information and right to communicate of persons with disabilities. • Encouraging and facilitating research to analyze the social and economic impact of ICTs for persons with disabilities and its relationship to other traditional and cultural practices of gathering information. (...) Implementing internal measures to support information access by the disabled • Establishing mechanisms for recognizing outstanding contributions towards promoting equitable participation of persons with disabilities in the knowledge society. • Ensuring that all UNESCO documents and information systems are accessible to persons with disabilities and conducting systematic audits to identify and address shortcomings. • Mainstreaming disability concerns within its ongoing and future activities such as within the framework of its Education For All monitoring activities. • Facilitating the production of films and television programmes documenting ICT potential in the education, training, employment and socialization of persons with disabilities.
Language:English
Score: 748979.5 - https://en.unesco.org/system/f..._2003_disabilities_191305e.pdf
Data Source: un
Article 5 States Parties shall respect the responsibilities, rights and duties of parents or, where applicable, the members of the extended family or community as provided for by local custom, legal guardians or other persons legally responsible for the child, to provide, in a manner consistent with the evolving capacities of the child, appropriate direction and guidance in the exercise by the child of the rights recognized in the present Convention. Article 6 3 1. States Parties recognize that every child has the inherent right to life. 2. (...) The members of the Committee shall be elected by secret ballot from a list of persons nominated by States Parties. Each State Party may nominate one person from among its own nationals. 4.
Language:English
Score: 747600.3 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/default/files/crc.pdf
Data Source: un
Article 6 1. States Parties recognize that every child has the inherent right to life. 2. (...) The Committee shall consist of eighteen experts of high moral standing and recognized competence in the field covered by this Convention.1/ The members of the Committee shall be elected by States Parties from among their nationals and shall serve in their personal capacity, consideration being given to equitable geographical distribution, as well as to the principal legal systems. 3. The members of the Committee shall be elected by secret ballot from a list of persons nominated by States Parties. Each State Party may nominate one person from among its own nationals. 4.
Language:English
Score: 747600.3 - https://www.unicef.org/child-r...hts-convention/convention-text
Data Source: un