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In each count of this indictment charging torture, the acts were committed by, or at the instigation of, or with the consent or acquiescence of, an official or person acting in an official capacity, and for one or more of the following purposes: to obtain information or a confession from the victim or a third person; to punish the victim for an act the victim or a third person committed or was suspected of having committed; to intimidate or coerce the victim or a third person; and/or for any reason based upon discrimination of any kind. 15. (...) By these actions, Ranko CESIC committed: Count 4: a VIOLATION OF THE LAWS OR CUSTOMS OF WAR recognized by Article 3 of the Tribunal Statute and Article 3(1)(a) (murder) of the Geneva Conventions; Count 5: a CRIME AGAINST HUMANITY recognized by Article 5(a) (murder) of the Tribunal Statute. (...) Count 25: CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY recognized by Article 5(f) (torture) of the Tribunal Statute.
Language:English
Score: 745427.2 - https://www.icty.org/x/cases/cesic/ind/en/jel-1ai980512e.pdf
Data Source: un
Expressing solidarity with all people and countries affected by the pandemic, and condolences and sympathy to the families of the victims of COVID-19 and those whose lives and … have been affected by the pandemic, being aware about different impacts around all the world (El Salvador) livelihoods have been affected by the pandemic, (based on OP3 of 74/270; PP2 WHA) PP 2 Bis. Recognizing further the negative health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, including hunger and malnutrition, increased violence against women, children, and frontline health workers, as well as disruptions in the care of older persons and persons with disabilities; (PP11 WHA) (KSA) PP 3. (...) Recognizing the fundamental role of the United Nations system in catalysing and coordinating the comprehensive global response to COVID-19 pandemic and the central efforts of Member States therein, and recalling the constitutional mandate of the World Health Organization (WHO) to act, inter alia, as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work, and recognizing its key leadership role within the broader United Nations response and the importance of strengthened multilateral cooperation in addressing the COVID-19 pandemic and its extensive negative impacts, (PP2 WHA, later part verbatim PP4 WHA resolution) … and recalling the crucial role constitutional mandate of the World Health Organization… (Norway) Recognizing the fundamental role of the United Nations system in catalysing and coordinating the comprehensive global response to COVID-19 pandemic and the central efforts of Member States therein, Recognizing further the central role of the United Nations system in catalysing and coordinating the global response to control and contain the spread of COVID-19, and acknowledging the crucial role played by the World Health Organization, and recalling… (AG) …as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work, and recognizing acknowledging its key leadership role… (China) …and recognizing its key leadership important role within the broader… (Brazil) PP 11. (...) Recognizing that countries dependent on commodities, remittances or tourism have been particularly affected by the initial measures undertaken to contain the spread of COVID-19, (new) PP 17 Bis.
Language:English
Score: 745057.4 - https://www.un.org/pga/74/wp-c.../07/Compendium-Rev.3_Final.pdf
Data Source: un
We recall and reaffirm our commitments to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including commitments that relate to trafficking in persons, which are relevant to the implementation of the Global Plan of Action and recognize the importance of partnerships in this regard. (...) We also recognize the importance of universal ratification and implementation of other relevant international instruments that address trafficking in persons. (...) (based on OP12, A/Res/64/293 Annex) 20. We recognize that the issue of trafficking in persons in conflict situations, humanitarian crises and natural disasters requires further attention.
Language:English
Score: 743940.04 - https://www.un.org/pga/71/wp-c...bat-Trafficking-in-Persons.pdf
Data Source: un
States should recognize that persons with disabilities have the same right to self-determination as other citizens, including the right to accept or refuse treatment. (...) Emergency situations It has often been recognized that the needs of persons with disabilities are forgotten or neglected in general relief programmes. (...) It may occur in the family, in the community, in institutions and/or in emergency situations. Persons with disabilities need to be educated about how to avoid the occurrence of abuse, how to recognize when abuse has occurred and how to report it.
Language:English
Score: 743258.7 - https://www.un.org/development...bilities-annex-ecn-520044.html
Data Source: un
Recognize and protect rights of persons with disabilities, UN chief urges | United Nations Enable Skip to Content Welcome to the United Nations Toggle navigation English Department of Economic and Social Affairs Disability Search UN DESA Home About Us *COVID-19 CRPD COSP SDGs International Day Issues Resources Multimedia News Calendar Contact Us Home About Us *COVID-19 CRPD COSP SDGs International Day Issues Resources Multimedia News Calendar Contact Us Home Recognize and protect rights of persons with disabilities, UN chief urges Recognize and protect rights of persons with disabilities, UN chief urges 21 December 2020 “These rights touch on every aspect of life: the right to go to school, to live in one’s community, to access health care, to start a family, to engage in political participation, to be able to play sport, to travel – and to have decent work,” UN  Secretary-General António Guterres  said in a  message .  (...) “On this  International Day of Persons with Disabilities , let us all commit to work together to tackle the obstacles, injustices and discrimination that persons with disabilities experience.”  (...) An “obvious learning” from the past few months was a “conspicuous lack of consultation” with persons with disabilities, which resulted in missing of predictable problems and negatively affected COVID-19 responses,  said  Danlami Basharu, Chair of the  Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities . 
Language:English
Score: 743191 - https://www.un.org/development...persons-with-disabilities.html
Data Source: un
Nothing in the present Covenant may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or person any right to engage in any activity or perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms recognized herein or at their limitation to a greater extent than is provided for in the present Covenant. 2. (...) Nothing in this article shall prejudice the trial and punishment of any person for any act or omission which, at the time when it was committed, was criminal according to the general principles of law recognized by the community of nations. (...) The Committee shall be composed of nationals of the States Parties to the present Covenant who shall be persons of high moral character and recognized competence in the field of human rights, consideration being given to the usefulness of the participation of some persons having legal experience. 3.
Language:English
Score: 742881.35 - https://www.ohchr.org/en/instr...ant-civil-and-political-rights
Data Source: un
The Council, moreover, recognized the needs of civilians under foreign occupation and stressed in that regard the responsibilities of the occupying Power. (...) “The Security Council is mindful of the particular vulnerability of refugees and internally displaced persons and reaffirms the primary responsibility of States to ensure their protection, in particular by maintaining the security and civilian character of camps of refugees and internally displaced persons. (...) “The Security Council recognizes the importance of a comprehensive, coherent and action-oriented approach to the protection of civilians in armed conflict.
Language:English
Score: 742262.2 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-213656/
Data Source: un
Promotion of a positive image of older persons, including through the education system and media campaigns, can greatly enhance a wider appreciation of the contributions older persons can make to society. (...) We confirm that a favourable environment for active ageing, promotion of lifelong learning, access to modern information and communication technologies, and volunteerism and civic engagement are crucial means to promote participation. We recognize the importance of promoting the participation of persons, as they age, in the economic, social, cultural and political life of their societies. (...) We call for supporting older persons in need of care. We recognize that a successful strategy for care should strive for a balance between paid work and family life as well as between care provided by different care providers.
Language:English
Score: 741652.73 - https://unece.org/DAM/pau/age/...aration/ECE_AC30_2007_L1_E.pdf
Data Source: un
Microsoft Word - 11-3 Final E.doc Human Rights Council Eleventh Session Resolution 11/3. Trafficking in persons, especially women and children The Human Rights Council, Reaffirming all previous resolutions on the problem of trafficking in persons, especially women and children, in particular General Assembly resolutions 63/156 and 63/194 of 18 December 2008, and also its resolution 8/12 of 18 June 2008, in which the Council extended the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children, Recalling the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, Reaffirming the principles set forth in relevant human rights instruments and declarations, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Optional Protocol thereto on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and the Optional Protocol thereto, Recalling the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the protocols thereto, and reaffirming in particular the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the Convention, and recalling the Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others, Recognizing that victims of trafficking are particularly exposed to racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, and that women and girl victims are often subject to multiple forms of discrimination and violence, including on the grounds of their gender, age, ethnicity, culture and religion, as well as their origins, and that these forms of discrimination may themselves fuel trafficking in persons, Recognizing also that trafficking in persons violates human rights and impairs the enjoyment of them, continues to pose a serious challenge to humanity and requires a concerted international assessment and response and genuine multilateral cooperation among countries of origin, transit and destination for it to be eradicated, Bearing in mind that all States have an obligation to exercise due diligence to prevent trafficking in persons, to investigate and punish perpetrators, to rescue victims and to provide for their protection, and that not doing so violates and impairs or nullifies the enjoyment of the human rights and fundamental freedoms of victims, 2 Recognizing the need to address the impact of globalization on the particular problem of trafficking in women and children, Recognizing also the challenges to combating trafficking in persons, especially women and children, owing to the lack of adequate legislation and implementation of existing legislation, the lack of availability of reliable sex- and age-disaggregated data and statistics and the lack of resources, Noting that some of the demand for prostitution and forced labour is met by trafficking in persons in some parts of the world, Recognizing that policies and programmes for prevention, rehabilitation, return and reintegration should be developed through a gender- and age-sensitive, comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach, with concern for the security of the victims and respect for the full enjoyment of their human rights and with the involvement of all actors in countries of origin, transit and destination, Taking note with appreciation of the report of the Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children (A/HRC/10/16), presented to the Council at its tenth session, Taking note with appreciation also of the report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the latest developments within the United Nations relating to combating trafficking in persons and on the relevant activities of the Office (A/HRC/10/64), and taking note of the Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights and Human Trafficking contained in that report, presented to the Council at its tenth session, Taking note of the meeting of the Open-ended Interim Working Group on Trafficking in Persons of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, held in Vienna on 14 and 15 April 2009, and the recommendations resulting therefrom, and the interactive dialogue on the theme “Taking collective action to end human trafficking” of the General Assembly, held on 13 May 2009, which included a discussion on the advisability of a global plan of action against human trafficking, Welcoming especially the efforts of Governments, United Nations bodies and agencies and intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to address the problem of trafficking in persons, especially women and children, Recognizing the concern expressed by the Human Rights Committee, the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, the Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Committee against Torture at the persistence of trafficking and the vulnerability of victims to human rights violations, 1. Affirms that it is essential to place the protection of human rights at the centre of measures taken to prevent and end trafficking in persons, and to protect, assist and provide access to adequate redress to victims, including the possibility of obtaining compensation from the perpetrators; 3 2. (...) Invites Governments to include information on measures and best practices to combat trafficking in persons, especially women and children, in their national reports submitted for the universal periodic review; 6.
Language:English
Score: 741489.06 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/...humanrights/A_HRC_RES_11_3.pdf
Data Source: un
Article  51: “Imprisoned persons are recognized the following rights: [...]  5. (...) Article  66: “The following rights of persons are recognized and guaranteed: [...]  2.   (...) States Parties recognize the right of persons with disabilities to an adequate standard of living for themselves and their families, including adequate food, clothing and housing, and to the continuous improvement of living conditions, and shall take appropriate steps to safeguard and promote the realization of this right without discrimination on the basis of disability.
Language:English
Score: 740556.35 - https://www.fao.org/right-to-f...nd-the-globe/countries/ecu/ar/
Data Source: un