Home

Results 61 - 70 of 249,598 for reducers. Search took 10.087 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Article Members of the Parliament of Montenegro respond: How can child poverty be reduced? The young reporters talked to the representatives of the caucuses in the Parliament of Montenegro and asked them to answer in one minute the question of how to reduce child poverty in Montenegro. (...) Milos Konatar, the Civic Movement URA Social Democrat MP Boris Mugosa said that the budget for social and child protection should not be reduced during the current crisis.. An important message must be that we must not reduce budget allocations for social and child protection. (...) Read the story Article SOS Line: Support that Parents Need Social worker Lepa Zunjic advises on a daily basis parents who are facing numerous challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic Read the story Article Employment for single parents to reduce child poverty UNICEF young reporters ask: How to reduce child poverty in Montenegro?
Language:English
Score: 378279.4 - https://www.unicef.org/montene...w-can-child-poverty-be-reduced
Data Source: un
WHO Secretariat assigned to report on the implementation of WHO's global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. (...) In response to decision WHA72(11), the process which the WHO Secretariat will follow to develop the report is as follows: 27-28 June 2019: Discussions during the Second WHO Forum on alcohol, drugs and addictive behaviours (Geneva, 27-28 June 2019) with Member States, NGOs and academic institutions on the implementation of the WHO Global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol; 1 July – 15 September 2019: Data collection from Member States (through WHO Regional and Country Offices) on the implementation of the WHO Global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol (within the framework of the Global survey on progress towards SDG target 3.5); 15 September – 15 October 2019: Regional consultations with Member States on the implementation of the WHO global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol since its endorsement, and the way forward, and validation of country information collected through the above-mentioned survey; 30 September 2019: WHO Secretariat will submit a preliminary report on the implementation of WHO’s global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol during the first decade since its endorsement, and the way forward, to WHO Governing Bodies Secretariat (GBS) summarizing the findings until 30 September 2019; 15 October – 21 October 2019: WHO Secretariat will develop a discussion paper on the implementation of the WHO global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol since its endorsement, and the way forward; 21 October – 4 November 2019: Web-based consultation on a discussion paper dated 21 October 2019 on the implementation of the WHO global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol since its endorsement, and the way forward. (...) Subscribe to our newsletters → Media Contacts Dr Vladimir Poznyak Coordinator, Alcohol, Drugs and Addictive Behaviours World Health Organization Email: [email protected] Related Decision /WHA72/A72(11) Download the Global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol Resolution WHA63.13 - Global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol Download the global status report on alcohol and health - 2018 Access the online consultation here News Call for action to reduce the harmful use of alcohol 21 May 2010 More Alcohol heath topic page Management of Substance Use Global information system on alcohol and health SAFER initiative Regions Africa Americas Eastern Mediterranean Europe South-East Asia Western Pacific Policies Cyber security Ethics Permissions and licensing Preventing sexual exploitation Terms of use About us Careers Library Procurement Publications Frequently asked questions Contact us Subscribe to our newsletters Privacy Legal Notice © 2022 WHO
Language:English
Score: 378279.4 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...uce-the-harmful-use-of-alcohol
Data Source: un
*reproduced by kind permission of GeSI But ICT has an enabling (mitigating) impact… *reproduced by kind permission of GeSI GenerationGeneration ArchitecturesArchitectures EquipmentEquipment Working together to exploit the power of ICT Standards organisationsInnovation Innovation BT’s Green Path… • BT consumes 0.7% of the UK’s total power • BT have reduced our UK carbon footprint by 58%* • BT aims to reduce carbon emissions – UK: 80% reduction by 2016* – Globally: 80% reduction by 2020* BT’s vision – is to help customers thrive in a chang ing world and we believe that better communications can help create a better, more susta inable world for everyone. 1.6 M Tonnes CO2 0.6 M Tonnes CO2 0.3 M Tonnes CO2 1996 2006 2016 *based on the 1996 figure UK component We have achieved this by: • Purchasing Renewable Energy • Creating energy efficiencies in the network and data centres • Using our own technology – To work flexibly – To reduce travel – To enable home-working – Home-shoring – Field force automation Contact Centre Efficiencies and BT CRM Homeshoring Virtual contact centres enable you to use the most talented agents anywhere in the world – building a sustainable workforce across all geograp hies, languages and cultures Benefits • Build teams to include carers, differently-abled or mature workers • 30-second commute: Reduces and saves energy and improves motivation • Reduce costs: Office space, utilities, agent churn, recruitment, training • Flexibility to respond to fluctuating demand • BT’s breadth of experience (4,000 contact centres) ensures BT is a partner of choice for virtualising global contact centres Benefits • Reduces or avoids travel to meetings • Reduced costs, reduction of office space • Increases productivity • Global connectivity away from the office • Frees staff to spend more time with customers Flexible Working – including BT MobileXpress and Conferencing Flexible working solutions allow desk sharers, home workers and mobile employees to access all the resources associated with traditional office enviro nments, helping to create an agile workforce that’s empowered, informed and efficient anywhere at anyti me. 0 20.000 40.000 60.000 80.000 100.000 2002 2004 2006 2007 Total avoided CO 2 emissions from using conferencing to replace face-to-face meetings within BT 97K tonnes per year saved BT teleworkers take 63% less sick leave than their office-based colleagues Unified communications solutions Benefits • Simpler collaboration • Improved productivity • Increased responsiveness • Reduced cost • Increased client-facing time Our solutions can enable users can take part in alm ost any kind of communication to anyone at any time, by linking voice, mobile and data serv ices with desktop. (...) Field Force Automation Benefits • Improved productivity through enhanced data capture • Real-time reporting on key operational performance indicators • Close business or solve customer problems on the spot • Reduced reliance on paper records The FFA suite is a set of solutions enabling automa tion of a business’ mobile workforce it enables a company's field force to access corporate data and applications from any device, anywhere and at any time. Technology – Around the corner • Always available Broadband • New data centre • Pressure on games market for better processors and standby • Smart metering • Smart logistics - improvements in transport scheduling and storage • Smart motor systems - optimisation • Smart buildings – better design, management and automation • Smart grids – reducing losses in power sector Key Messages • ICTs may be part of the problem but are also part of the solution to Climate Change • ICTs can reduce GHG emissions in other sectors by 20% by 2020 (equal to the total emissions of US or China) • Many new technologies are emerging which will enable energy efficiencies • Need an open industry standard protocol for on-line interrogation of energy consumption of equipment • Industry needs a carbon content labelling scheme for power sources • ICT Standards and leadership are key to our future Thank You www.bt.com/betterworld
Language:English
Score: 378219.46 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it.../26/07/T26070000010035PDFE.pdf
Data Source: un
WTO | The WTO and the Millennium Development Goals WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION Home   |  About WTO   |  News & events   |  Trade topics   |  WTO membership   |  Documents & resources   |  External relations Contact us   |  Site map   |  A-Z   |  Search español   français home the wto mdg mdgs MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS United Nations Millennium Development Goals The United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are eight international development goals that all 192 members and a number of international organizations have agreed to achieve by the year 2015 to end poverty. They include reducing extreme poverty, reducing child mortality rates, fighting disease epidemics, such as HIV/AIDS, and creating a global partnership for development. (...) See also: > More on WTO and the UN Goal 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger Target 1a: Reduce by half the proportion of people living on less than a dollar a day Target 1b: Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and young people Target 1c: Reduce by half the proportion of people who suffer from hunger Goal 2: Achieve universal primary education Target 2a: Ensure that all boys and girls complete a full course of primary schooling Goal 3: Promote gender equality and empower women Target 3a: Eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education preferably by 2005, and at all levels by 2015 Goal 4: Reduce child mortality Target 4a: Reduce by two thirds the mortality rate among children under five Goal 5: Improve maternal health Target 5a: Reduce by three quarters the maternal mortality ratio Target 5b: Achieve, by 2015, universal access to reproductive health Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases Target 6a: Halt and begin to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS Target 6b: Achieve, by 2010, universal access to treatment for HIV/AIDS for all those who need it Target 6c: Halt and begin to reverse the incidence of malaria and other major diseases Goal 7: Ensure environmental sustainability Target 7a: Integrate the principles of sustainable development into country policies and programmes; reverse loss of environmental resources Target 7b: Reduce biodiversity loss, achieving, by 2010, a significant reduction in the rate of loss Target 7c: Reduce by half the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation Target 7d: Achieve significant improvement in lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers, by 2020 Goal 8: Develop a Global Partnership for Development Target 8a: Develop further an open, rule-based, predictable, non-discriminatory trading and financial system Target 8b: Address the special needs of the least developed countries Target 8c: Address the special needs of landlocked developing countries and small island developing States Target 8d: Deal comprehensively with the debt problems of developing countries Target 8e: In cooperation with pharmaceutical companies, provide access to affordable essential drugs in developing countries Target 8f: In cooperation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications  
Language:English
Score: 378169.53 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...wto_e/coher_e/mdg_e/mdgs_e.htm
Data Source: un
More on the process for developing nutrition guidelines at WHO Category 1 Anaemia: optimal timing of cord clamping for the prevention of iron deficiency anaemia in infants Assessment for nutrition-related disorders in women during pregnancy Breastfeeding education for increased breastfeeding duration Breastfeeding: creating an environment in care facilities that supports breastfeeding Breastfeeding: early initiation to promote exclusive breastfeeding Breastfeeding: exclusive breastfeeding for optimal growth, development and health of infants Breastfeeding: feeding of infants unable to breastfeed directly in care facilities Breastfeeding: regulation of marketing breast-milk substitutes Breastfeeding: support for mothers to initiate and establish breastfeeding after childbirth Caffeine: restricting intake during pregnancy Calcium supplementation during pregnancy to reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia Deworming in children Deworming in non-pregnant adolescent girls and women of reproductive age Deworming in pregnant women Fortification of maize flour and corn meal Fortification of rice HIV/AIDS: infant feeding for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV Intermittent preventative treatment to reduce the risk of malaria during pregnancy Iodization of salt for the prevention and control of iodine deficiency disorders Iron and folic acid: daily supplementation during pregnancy Iron and folic acid: daily supplementation during pregnancy in malaria-endemic areas Iron and folic acid: intermittent supplementation during pregnancy Iron and folic acid: intermittent supplementation during pregnancy in malaria-endemic areas Iron and folic acid: intermittent supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls Iron and folic acid: intermittent supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls in malaria-endemic areas Iron: daily supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls Iron: daily supplementation in children 24–59 months of age Iron: daily supplementation in children 24–59 months of age in malaria-endemic areas Iron: daily supplementation in children 6-23 months of age Iron: daily supplementation in children 6-23 months of age in malaria-endemic areas Iron: daily supplementation in children and adolescents 5–12 years of age Iron: daily supplementation in children and adolescents 5–12 years of age in malaria-endemic areas Iron: intermittent supplementation in children in malaria-endemic areas Iron: intermittent supplementation in preschool and school-age children Iron: supplementation with or without folic acid to reduce the risk of postpartum anaemia Iron: supplementation with or without folic acid to reduce the risk of postpartum anaemia in malaria-endemic areas Low birth weight: breastfeeding of low-birth-weight infants Low birth weight: cup-feeding for low-birth-weight infants unable to fully breastfeed Low birth weight: demand feeding for low-birth-weight infants Low birth weight: donor human milk for low-birth-weight infants Low birth weight: feeding of very-low-birth-weight infants Low birth weight: kangaroo mother care to reduce morbidity and mortality in low-birth-weight infants Low birth weight: micronutrient supplementation in low-birth-weight and very-low-birth-weight infants Low birth weight: mother’s milk for low-birth-weight infants Low birth weight: standard formula for low-birth-weight infants following hospital discharge Marketing: reducing the impact of marketing of foods and non-alcoholic beverages on children Maternal nutrition: balanced energy and protein supplementation during pregnancy Maternal nutrition: high-protein supplementation during pregnancy Moderate acute malnutrition: supplementary foods for the management of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged 6 - 59 months Multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by children 2-12 years of age Multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by children 6–23 months of age Multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by pregnant women Multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy Nutrition counselling during pregnancy Obesity: exclusive breastfeeding to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity Older people: supplemental nutrition with dietary advice for older people affected by undernutrition Potassium: increasing intake to control blood pressure in children Potassium: increasing intake to reduce blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular diseases in adults Severe acute malnutrition: fluid management in severely malnourished children under 5 years of age with shock Severe acute malnutrition: fluid management in severely malnourished children under 5 years of age without shock Severe acute malnutrition: identification of severe acute malnutrition in children 6–59 months of age Severe acute malnutrition: identification of severe acute malnutrition in infants under 6 months of age Severe acute malnutrition: identification of severe acute malnutrition requiring inpatient care in children 6–59 months of age Severe acute malnutrition: management of HIV-infected children under 5 years of age with severe acute malnutrition Severe acute malnutrition: management of infants under 6 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Severe acute malnutrition: management of severe acute malnutrition in children 6–59 months of age with oedema Severe acute malnutrition: micronutrient intake in children with severe acute malnutrition Severe acute malnutrition: therapeutic feeding of children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition and acute or persistent diarrhoea Severe acute malnutrition: transition feeding of children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Severe acute malnutrition: treatment of hypoglycaemia in children with severe acute malnutrition Severe acute malnutrition: treatment of hypothermia in children with severe acute malnutrition Severe acute malnutrition: use of antibiotics in the outpatient management of children 6-59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Severe acute malnutrition: vitamin A supplementation in children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Sodium: reducing sodium intake to control blood pressure in children Sodium: reducing sodium intake to reduce blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular diseases in adults Sugars: reducing free sugars intake in adults to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Sugars: reducing free sugars intake in children to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Tuberculosis: management of moderate undernutrition in individuals with active tuberculosis Tuberculosis: management of severe acute malnutrition in individuals with active tuberculosis Tuberculosis: micronutrient supplementation in individuals with active tuberculosis Tuberculosis: nutrition assessment and counselling in individuals with active tuberculosis Vitamin A supplementation during pregnancy Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected infants and children 6–59 months of age Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected women during pregnancy Vitamin A supplementation in infants 1–5 months of age Vitamin A supplementation in infants and children 6–59 months of age Vitamin A supplementation in neonates Vitamin A supplementation in postpartum women Vitamin B6 supplementation during pregnancy Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy Vitamin E and C supplementation during pregnancy Zika virus: infant feeding in areas of Zika virus transmission Zinc supplementation during pregnancy Category 2 Breastfeeding: continued breastfeeding for healthy growth and development of children Breastfeeding: implementation of the Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative Complementary feeding: appropriate complementary feeding Conditional cash transfer programmes and nutritional status Diarrhoea: water, sanitation and hygiene interventions to prevent diarrhoea Ebola virus disease: nutritional care of children and adults with Ebola virus disease in treatment centres Fatty acids: marine oil supplementation during pregnancy Folic acid: periconceptional supplementation to prevent neural tube defects Fortification of wheat flour HIV/AIDS: macronutrient supplementation for people living with HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS: micronutrient supplementation in HIV-infected women during pregnancy HIV/AIDS: nutrition counselling for adolescents and adults with HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS: nutritional care of HIV-infected children Insecticide-treated nets to reduce the risk of malaria in pregnant women Iodine supplementation in pregnant and lactating women Moderate acute malnutrition: supplementary foods for the management of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged 6 - 59 months Noncommunicable diseases: increasing fruit and vegetable consumption to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Obesity: limiting portion sizes to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity Obesity: reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity Obesity: reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages to reduce the risk of unhealthy weight gain in adults Supplementary feeding in community settings for promoting child growth Vitamin A supplementation in children with respiratory infections Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected adults Vitamin D supplementation and respiratory infections in children Vitamin D supplementation in infants Vitamin E supplementation for the prevention of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants Zinc supplementation and growth in children Zinc supplementation in children with respiratory infections Zinc supplementation in the management of diarrhoea Category 3 Biofortification of staple crops Vitamin A fortification of staple foods Contact us eLENA team Department of Nutrition for Health and Development (NHD) World Health Organization 20 Avenue Appia CH-1211 Geneva 27 Switzerland E-mail: [email protected] WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development You are here: e-Library of Evidence for Nutrition Actions (eLENA) Interventions by category Regions Africa Americas Eastern Mediterranean Europe South-East Asia Western Pacific About us Careers Library Procurement Publications Frequently asked questions Contact us Subscribe to our newsletters Privacy Legal Notice © 2022 WHO
Language:English
Score: 378112.65 - https://www.who.int/elena/categories/en/
Data Source: un
Martin 2018-04-22T12:09:07-04:00 23 Jun 2015 | Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities , Goal 2: Zero Hunger , Goal 3: Good Health , Goal 4: Quality Education , Goal 6: Water and Sanitation , Millennium Development Goals , News , Sustainable Development Agenda | UN deputy chief urges action to reduce exclusion and discrimination of persons with disabilities Gallery UN deputy chief urges action to reduce exclusion and discrimination of persons with disabilities Empowering persons with disabilities and securing their rights will advance society as a whole, United Nations Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson said today as he urged strengthening global cooperation and partnership on the matter at the Eighth Conference of States Parties to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. (...) Martin 2018-04-22T12:09:52-04:00 19 May 2015 | Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities , Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth , News | Faces – United Nations Free & Equal Dpi Devsection Intern 2018-04-22T12:09:54-04:00 15 May 2015 | Video: Goal 10 - Reduced Inequalities | UN ‘Free & Equal’ campaign launches video spotlighting LGBT diversity, fight against homophobia Martin 2018-04-22T12:09:55-04:00 15 May 2015 | Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities , Goal 11: Sustainable Cities , Goal 16: Peace and justice , News | Migration issues must be part of sustainable development agenda – UN official Gallery Migration issues must be part of sustainable development agenda – UN official The United Nations refugee agency and the world body’s top envoy on international migration have applauded European Union (EU) authorities’ proposals for dealing with refugees and migrants arriving in Europe via the Mediterranean, calling for swift implementation of the reforms “for the urgent purpose of saving lives.” (...) Martin 2018-04-22T12:09:59-04:00 14 May 2015 | Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities , Goal 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth , News | What role do indigenous people and forests have in a sustainable future?
Language:English
Score: 377959.67 - https://www.un.org/sustainable...ory/reduced-inequality/page/4/
Data Source: un
Local governments have the responsibility to reduce local disaster risks for residents and communities. (...)  Which measure is the most critical to reduce residual risks?  Which are the next critical measures to reduce risks? (...)  Is there any on-going projects to reduce the identified risk areas?  Is there any plan for projects in near future to reduce the identified risk areas?
Language:English
Score: 377923.36 - https://www.undrr.org/media/73583/download
Data Source: un
Social Protection and HiV: reSearcH imPlicationS for Policy - 3 of 6 combination social protection reduces HiV-risk in adolescents citation: cluver, l, orkin, m, yakubovich, a & Sherr, l. (2016) ‘combination Social Protection for reducing HiV-risk Behavior among adolescents in South africa’. JaidS 72(1): 96 -104 Social protection programs which aim to reduce HiV-risk behaviours often focus on unconditional cash transfer programs. (...) are there cumulative prevention bene- fits from accessing combination social protection? key meSSageS reducing HiV-risk behaviours is key to reduc- ing new HiV infections among adolescents.
Language:English
Score: 377715.38 - https://www.unicef.org/esa/sit...bination-Social-Protection.pdf
Data Source: un
Partners | Reducing Enteric Methane for improving food security and livelihoods | Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO.org english Reducing Enteric Methane for improving food security and livelihoods Background The Project Win-win opportunities Participating Countries Partners Resources Regional partners Donors Partners Reducing enteric methane for improving food security and livelihoods’ is a new collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (the FAO) and the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre (the NZAGRC).  (...) Its broad partnership approach takes concrete action to reduce short-lived climate pollutants, collectively and individually. (...) The NZAGRC’s research programme concentrates on six possible solutions to reducing livestock greenhouse gas emissions: low methane animals, low methane feeds, methane vaccine, methane inhibitors, reducing nitrous oxide and nitrate leaching and increasing soil carbon.    
Language:English
Score: 377533.6 - https://www.fao.org/in-action/enteric-methane/partners/en/
Data Source: un
Partners | Reducing Enteric Methane for improving food security and livelihoods | Продовольственная и сельскохозяйственная организация Объединенных Наций FAO.org english Русский Reducing Enteric Methane for improving food security and livelihoods Background The Project Win-win opportunities Participating Countries Partners Resources Regional partners Donors Partners Reducing enteric methane for improving food security and livelihoods’ is a new collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (the FAO) and the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre (the NZAGRC).  (...) Its broad partnership approach takes concrete action to reduce short-lived climate pollutants, collectively and individually. (...) The NZAGRC’s research programme concentrates on six possible solutions to reducing livestock greenhouse gas emissions: low methane animals, low methane feeds, methane vaccine, methane inhibitors, reducing nitrous oxide and nitrate leaching and increasing soil carbon.    
Language:English
Score: 377533.6 - https://www.fao.org/in-action/enteric-methane/partners/ru/
Data Source: un