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Fiji has not yet developed a national strategy for collection of agricultural statistics, and there is a lack of regular collection and survey activity. Additionally, there is a lack of financial and human resources to build and maintain agricultural statistics systems in the country. (...) The availability and regularity of agricultural production statistics should be improved, starting with conducting trainings in a number of areas, including basic statistical methods, agricultural statistics methods, advanced statistics methods and specialized techniques. (...) The country proposal paper identified four priority work streams, which are currently under Government consideration: assessment of the 2015 Agriculture Baseline Survey outcomes, supporting and improving administrative data collection activities, improving the availability and regularity of agriculture production statistics and adoption of mobile technologies by the Ministry of Agriculture and Ministry of Fisheries and Forests for data collection.
Language:English
Score: 813500.9 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...160121_GSARS-AP_Fiji_flyer.pdf
Data Source: un
By this program we support boarding house, medical insurance and close only for the pupil which get education at special schools. Training 1. Train special educators to serve as additional resources to regular teachers; Special education teachers in Georgia represent a small group of specialists, working with pupils with special needs in both, regular and special schools. (...) Teacher Professional Development Center (TPDC) provide the following support teachers to meet different needs of students: 1. In-service trainings for regular teachers. Training module was established and piloted in 2011. (...) Almost all regions of Georgia have been covered and more than 3000 teachers have been trained. 2. Individual consulting program – TPDC provides individual consulting program for regular teachers; for whom trainings are not helpful/ informative enough and need additional help in teaching students with special needs, can apply to the centre and ask for consultancy.
Language:English
Score: 813331.4 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...dyEducation/States/Georgia.pdf
Data Source: un
The existence of such a framework can for example foster • a regular Economic census • the access and use of administrative data sources • the use of an unique identifier for businesses Dimension 1: Legal and institutional framework • No statistical law or institutional arrangements, MOUs etc • Provision mandating NSO to collect data in statistical law or MOU • Standard statistical law covering the collection of SBR variables • Standard statistical law allows dissemination of the SBR Preliminary No law Early Provision to collect Mature Standard law Advanced Provision to disseminate Statistics Division • This dimension of the maturity model refers to the characteristics of SBR in terms of the data sources used for establishing and maintaining an SBR • What data sources are used to build and maintain the SBR? (...) Preliminary Limited / irregular Early Census / surveys Mature Surveys / Admin Advanced Multiple sources Statistics Division Dimension 3: Maintenance and update of SBRs • SBR is not maintained or updated • or is updated irregularly with no agreed procedures • Update, procedures, methods, and change logs, are being developed • Irregular and manual validations • Procedures, method and documentation • Validation is regular • Use profiling to create statistical units • Update is sub- annual • Procedures adjusted continuously • Gov unique identifier driven • Regular profiling and admin data used • Detailed unit record reports Preliminary Limited / irregular Early Being Developed Mature Procedures in place Advanced Improvement • Covers the operational requirements to maintain a SBR - prerequisite function of NSOs • Key objective - to update the coverage and content • Digitalization and automatization of procedures • Effort required for the maintenance - dependent on the main data source(s) • Maintain a documented set of procedures Statistics Division • This dimension of the maturity model refers to the coverage of SBRs. • There are three key aspects of SBR coverage: • Completeness is the extent to which the SBR includes all institutional units within the 2008 SNA production boundary • Coverage is the proportion of total national economic production that the units represent. • Content is the set of characteristics (e.g., types of units, institutional sector, size, location and registration status) of the units contained in the SBR. (...) Dimension 7: Interoperability • No considerations for the interoperability with other registers • limited interoperability with other systems which are mainly confined to administrative sources • Common ID to identify people and enterprises across admin & statistical registers • Compliant - international standards and classifications • Micro-data linking • Can link with other statistical registers • Regional cross- country analysis possible • Exchange infor- mation at enter- prise level Preliminary No consideration Early Limited Mature Common ID Advanced Can be linked Statistics Division • to help NSOs identify gaps in their SBRs’ level of maturity in each dimension and to provide resources and training material to NSOs to facilitate efforts to improve in these areas. • The maturity model toolkit consists of the following: • Interactive Self-assessment questionnaire • Link to existing manuals handbooks and training material • Regular global assessment on the implementation of SBR in countries Additional tools: Maturity model toolkit Statistics Division • An online tool to assess the status of implementation of the SBR • Seven modules, each corresponding to a specific dimension • Each module contains several questions and based on the answers, the stage of maturity for that dimension can be derived • The SBR Maturity model: • can be used to evaluate the maturity of the national SBR; and • can be used to develop a roadmap towards maturity Interactive Self-assessment questionnaire Statistics Division • Stocktaking of existing manuals, training material, tools, best practices etc. • Mapping of list of materials to dimensions and stages of maturity Link to existing manuals handbooks and training material • UNSD-SIAP-ADB E-Learning course Foundational course on Statistical Business Registers was developed with the UNCEBTS Task teams taking into accounts the maturity model for SBRs Statistics Division • The maturity model and the self-assessment questionnaire will be the basis for the development of a regular global assessment on the implementation of SBR in countries. • The global assessment is intended to be conducted on a regular basis, say every 5 years. • The main objectives of the global assessment are to: • monitor the implementation of SBRs in countries, and • identify priority areas to develop technical assistance programmes and further guidance and training materials • It will be coordinated with the country progress reports of the Wiesbaden Group on SBR and the Expert Group on SBRs Global assessment on the implementation of the SBR in countries Statistics Division dimatteo@un.org business_stat@un.org Thank you!
Language:English
Score: 812288.8 - https://unece.org/sites/defaul...R-ECE%20regional%20Worshop.pdf
Data Source: un
Session documents | UN-Women Executive Board | UN Women – Headquarters English Español Français 6872 results found Secondary navigation Executive Board Overview Calendar Membership Bureau Secretariat Session documents 2022 2021 sessions and other meetings 2020 sessions and other meetings 2019 sessions and other meetings 2018 sessions and other meetings 2017 sessions and other meetings 2016 sessions and other meetings 2015 sessions and other meetings Compendiums of decisions Reports of sessions Key Documents Commission on the Status of Women Brief history CSW snapshot CSW67 (2023) CSW66 (2022) Preparations Official Documents Official Meetings Side Events Session Outcomes CSW65 (2021) Preparations Official Documents Official Meetings Side Events Session Outcomes CSW64 / Beijing+25 (2020) Preparations Official Documents Side Events Session outcomes CSW63 (2019) Preparations Official Documents Official Meetings Side Events Session outcomes Previous sessions CSW62 (2018) CSW61 (2017) CSW60 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sessions and other meetings 2019 sessions and other meetings 2018 sessions and other meetings 2017 sessions and other meetings 2016 sessions and other meetings 2015 sessions and other meetings Compendiums of decisions Reports of sessions Key Documents Commission on the Status of Women Brief history CSW snapshot CSW67 (2023) CSW66 (2022) Preparations Official Documents Official Meetings Side Events Session Outcomes CSW65 (2021) Preparations Official Documents Official Meetings Side Events Session Outcomes CSW64 / Beijing+25 (2020) Preparations Official Documents Side Events Session outcomes CSW63 (2019) Preparations Official Documents Official Meetings Side Events Session outcomes Previous sessions CSW62 (2018) CSW61 (2017) CSW60 (2016) CSW59 / Beijing+20 (2015) CSW58 (2014) CSW57 (2013) Member States NGO participation Eligibility Registration Opportunities for NGOs to address the Commission Communications procedure Outcomes Trust funds Fund for Gender Equality Our model Grant making Accompaniment and growth Results and impact Knowledge and learning Social innovation Join us Materials UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women Procedimiento para solicitar fondos Socios Publicaciones Hacer una donación Get involved Generation Equality About Generation Equality Generation Equality Forum Action packs Toolkit
Language:English
Score: 812254.2 - https://www.unwomen.org/en/executive-board/documents
Data Source: un
BUDGETARY CONSIDERATIONS 5.1 Expenditures for 2002, 2003 and 2004 5.1.1 During the period 2002-2004, the Plan of Action has been funded by the Regular Programme and voluntary contributions from States through the Enhanced AVSEC Mechanism. (...) However, although a proposal to include an additional U.S. $ 3.0 million for aviation security-related activities in the Regular Programme for 2005 to 2007 was considered, the Council concluded that this was not feasible in the present budgetary circumstances. 5.2.2 Consequently, while the activities contained in the Aviation Security Plan of Action have been incorporated into the draft Regular Programme Budget document for 2005 to 2007 (A35-WP/20), funding from the Regular Programme will be on a similar scale to the present triennium and these activities will continue to be heavily dependent on voluntary contributions from States. Those activities that are foreseen to be funded from the extrabudgetary resources have been identified in the draft Regular Programme Budget document using a diamond and a specific footnote.
Language:English
Score: 812217.4 - https://www.icao.int/Meetings/...%2035th%20Session/wp049_en.pdf
Data Source: un
To receive a permit, hazardous installations must have fire alarm plans. Regular training exercises are part of the plans. (...) Examples of good practices include regular training of fire brigades, the provision of fire-fighting tools, education on the environmental aspects of firefighting, and the availability of fire alarm plans. 1 Journal of Law 2002. (...) In some places automatic safety installations are in place. Regular training is obligatory. Examples are the International Rhine Commission Recommendation for the Safety of Trans-shipment, the European Agreement Concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR) and the European Agreements Concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Rail (RID).
Language:English
Score: 811971.5 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA...06/wat/ece.mp.wat.2006.9.e.pdf
Data Source: un
The matrix is revised on a regular basis to keep the information relevant and up to date. (...) Para 9: Urges UNICEF to ensure that leadership in country are aware of their responsibilities for protection from sexual exploitation and abuse and sexual harassment; that in all country offices there are respective staff with responsibilities for protection from sexual exploitation and abuse and sexual harassment who participate in inter-agency coordination mechanisms as appropriate; and that staff are provided with appropriate role-specific training as well as regular mandatory training to support culture change; Orientation to the core values of UNICEF, ethical standards, etc. is included in onboarding trainings for all new staff. The mandatory online training on sexual exploitation and abuse/sexual harassment is still a requirement for all employees, and UNICEF is considering making it a requirement on a regular basis (e.g., through refresher trainings).
Language:English
Score: 810695.65 - https://www.unicef.org/executi...toring_table-EN-2022.09.02.pdf
Data Source: un
Report of the Regional Implementation Review of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration in Latin America and the Caribbean is now available | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations 2030 Agenda COVID-19 Español English Português About ECLAC tw fb fl yt Main menu Topics Economic Economic development International trade and integration Production, productivity and management Social Social development Population and development Environmental Sustainable development and human settlements Natural resources Cross-cutting 2030 Agenda Gender affairs Planning for development Statistics Regional architecture Regional architecture Sessions of the Commission Observatories Subsidiary bodies Regional Forum on Sustainable Development Treaties and agreements Cooperation Data and statistics Knowledge Publications Featured Search CEPAL Review Notas de Población Training Courses Workshops Study programmes Library Featured Search Ask us Communities All Communities Observatories All Observatories News Events Available in English Español Report of the Regional Implementation Review of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration in Latin America and the Caribbean is now available Population and development 31 May 2022 | Briefing note The United Nations Network on Migration, which in Latin America and the Caribbean is coordinated by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), through the Latin American and Caribbean Center for Demography (CELADE) - Population Division, has prepared this Report. banner_informe_pacto_migracion_eng This Review represents the regional contribution to the first International Migration Review Forum (IMRF), which took place at the United Nations Headquarters in New York from 17-20 May 2022, the only intergovernmental platform of the United Nations to discuss and share progress on the implementation of all aspects of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration. (...) Share Links Informe de la Revisión Regional de la implementación del Pacto Mundial para la Migración Segura, Ordenada y Regular ALyC Report on the regional review of the implementation of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration LA&C Subtopics Migration International migration Subscription Get ECLAC press releases by email Subscribe You might be interested in 26 Sep 2022 video How does international migration contribute to sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean? (...) ECLAC Directors ECLAC History Work with us: jobs Suppliers - Acquisitions 2030 Agenda SDG Gateway Regional architecture Commission sessions Observatories Regional Forum for Sustainable Development Treaties and conventions Knowledge Publications Training Library Comunidades Cooperation United Nations Development Account Regular Technical Cooperation Program Extrabudgetary programs and projects Covid-19 COVID Observatory Data and statistics CEPALSTAT News Live broadcasts News Releases Announcements Opinion column Speeches Infographics Images ECLAC in the media Videos Topics Economical Economic development International trade and integration Production, productivity and management Social Social development Population and development Environmental Natural resources Sustainable development and human settlements Cross-cutting 2030 Agenda Gender affairs Planning for development Statistics Events Events Contact Contact © ECLAC - United Nations Terms and conditions
Language:English
Score: 810504.1 - https://www.cepal.org/en/notes...ly-and-regular-migration-latin
Data Source: un
Fifth Regular Meeting of the Summit Implementation Review Group (SIRG) | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations 2030 Agenda COVID-19 Español English Português About ECLAC tw fb fl yt Main menu Topics Economic Economic development International trade and integration Production, productivity and management Social Social development Population and development Environmental Sustainable development and human settlements Natural resources Cross-cutting 2030 Agenda Gender affairs Planning for development Statistics Regional architecture Regional architecture Sessions of the Commission Observatories Subsidiary bodies Regional Forum on Sustainable Development Treaties and agreements Cooperation Data and statistics Knowledge Publications Featured Search CEPAL Review Notas de Población Training Courses Workshops Study programmes Library Featured Search Ask us Communities All Communities Observatories All Observatories News Events Available in English Fifth Regular Meeting of the Summit Implementation Review Group (SIRG) International trade and integration 11 May 2022 | Briefing note Fifth Regular Meeting of the Summit Implementation Review Group (SIRG) toward the preparation of the IX Summit of the Americas. ECLAC - Washington, D.C. sirg.jpg Fifth Regular Meeting of the Summit Implementation Review Group (SIRG) toward the preparation of the IX Summit of the Americas On May 2, 3, and 6, 2022, in Los Angeles, California, the Director ad interim of the ECLAC Washington Office, Raquel Artecona, participated in the Fifth Regular Meeting of the Summit Implementation Review Group (SIRG) toward the preparation of the IX Summit of the Americas, that will take place in Los Angeles, California, June 8-10, 2022. (...) ECLAC Directors ECLAC History Work with us: jobs Suppliers - Acquisitions 2030 Agenda SDG Gateway Regional architecture Commission sessions Observatories Regional Forum for Sustainable Development Treaties and conventions Knowledge Publications Training Library Comunidades Cooperation United Nations Development Account Regular Technical Cooperation Program Extrabudgetary programs and projects Covid-19 COVID Observatory Data and statistics CEPALSTAT News Live broadcasts News Releases Announcements Opinion column Speeches Infographics Images ECLAC in the media Videos Topics Economical Economic development International trade and integration Production, productivity and management Social Social development Population and development Environmental Natural resources Sustainable development and human settlements Cross-cutting 2030 Agenda Gender affairs Planning for development Statistics Events Events Contact Contact © ECLAC - United Nations Terms and conditions
Language:English
Score: 810504.1 - https://www.cepal.org/en/notes...plementation-review-group-sirg
Data Source: un
Syria Humanitarian Fund Risk Management Framework September 2020 Risk Category Risk Likelihood Impact Risk Mitigation Measure Action Owners Strategic Inadequate needs assessments or limited quality of assessment and data Limited caseload coverage across sectors due to lack of timeliness, predictability of donors contribution or inadequacy of funding to reach critical mass Deteriorating economic conditions, including as a result of financial crisis, long- term impact of socio- economic including from COVID-19 Likely Moderately likely Very likely Moderate Severe Severe • Provide data collection and analysis of NGO and sector coverage and advocate for diversity of funding among multi partners in the targeted hotspots • Encourage all SHF partners to actively partake in existing coordination mechanisms • Continuous outreach to promote all partners to take active part in sector systems • Continuous analysis and information sharing on partner presence and sectoral response coverage • Needs-based and evidence- based programming & triangulation of sources of data • Regular reporting & advocacy vis-à-vis all parties • Create a communication strategy to support ongoing dialogue on needs • Use SHF funds to fill gaps and respond to emergencies • Regular engagement by the UN and INGOs on effect of economic crisis on humanitarian operations, developing operational plan (such as request conditions and requirements for waivers, collective advocacy, etc.) • Implementing partners to review preparedness and response measures related • OCHA HFU • OCHA Coordination • OCHA IM • ISC • Sector coordinators • HC • AB • HoO • OCHA HFU • ISC • OCHA IM OCHA Comms • Sector coordinators • HC • AB • HoO • OCHA HFU • OCHA Coordination • OCHA IM OCHA Comms • ISC Assistance creates protection risks or fuel tensions Unlikely Critical to economic deterioration and operational response plans and update regularly • Continued advocacy with relevant stakeholders (GoS counterparts, Central Bank of Syria) • Further advocacy to the donor community to expand support in increased number of people in need • Sector specific Protection Risk Analysis is regularly updated and incorporated in HRP and SHF projects. • Enhancements planned to mainstream context-sensitive programming in all interventions • Implementing partners to review data protection safeguards and gaps • Sector coordinators • Implementing partners • OCHA HFU • OCHA Coordination • ISC • Sector coordinators • Implementing partners Operational Constraints to acquire timely clearances to program implementation, especially in areas where pre-approved is required Sexual exploitation and abuse of beneficiaries Likely Moderately likely Critical Severe • Requests for consistent and timely clearance of assistance based on needs and identified priorities • Advocacy at the highest level are conducted regularly • Improve support to the hub- level to ensure further decentralization of the project implementation • Engagement with PSEA In- Country- Network • Training and awareness raising activities on PSEA • Established and active community-based complaint mechanisms • Dissemination of SOPs among partners • Immediate investigations upon reports of SEA • HC • HoO • OCHA HFU • HC • HoO • OCHA HFU • OCHA CBPF Section Inconsistent access to affected population across areas of control Limited availability and capacity of partners to deliver, diversify programmes and scale up (varies by sector) COVID-19 outbreak amongst community and humanitarian partners Likely Moderately likely Likely Severe Severe Severe • Requests for consistent and timely clearance of assistance based on needs and identified priorities • Advocacy at the highest level are conducted regularly • Improve support to the hub- level to ensure further decentralization of the project implementation • Stronger national NGO outreach and training on humanitarian principles and project management • Diversify funding and outreach to new NGOs including enforce due diligence, capacity assessment/review, risk rating/ and compliance mechanism • Implement telecommuting and videoconferencing including work from home modality • Put in place medical evacuation capacity and quarantine, isolation protocols for staff; provision of office and home hygiene items and Personal Protective Equipment • Prioritize activities based on programme criticality • Adaptation of operations ensuring that programme implementation does not put beneficiaries and partners at a higher risk of infection • HC • HoO • OCHA Access • OCHA HFU • OCHA HFU • HC • HoO • OCHA • Implementing partners Fiduciary Fraud/corruption Poor financial management by implementing partners Theft and diversion of resources, access limitation or poor oversight Likely Likely Moderately likely Critical Severe Critical • Periodic reporting on project implementation progress • Stronger national NGO outreach and training on risk management • Stronger financial control requirement for partner programming • Continuous and consistent monitoring and updating performance index to identify and tackle underperformance issues • • HC • HoO • OCHA HFU • CBPF NY Cross- cutting Hostilities and/or deterioration of security conditions compromising programme implementation and/or staff safety and security in some areas Likely Severe • Implement telecommuting and videoconferencing including work from home modality • Put in place medical evacuation capacity and quarantine, isolation protocols for staff; provision of office and home hygiene items and Personal Protective Equipment • Prioritize activities based on programme criticality • Adaptation of operations ensuring that programme implementation does not put beneficiaries and partners at a higher risk of infection • HC • HoO • OCHA • Implementing partners Category of Identified Risks for the SHF Category Potential Risks Strategic • Inadequate needs assessments or limited quality of assessment and data. • Limited caseload coverage across sectors due to lack of timeliness, predictability of donors’ contribution or inadequacy of funding to reach critical mass. • Deteriorating economic conditions, including as a result of financial crisis, long-term impact of socio-economic including from COVID 19. • Assistance creates protection risks or fuels tensions Operational • Constraints to acquire timely clearances to program implementation, especially in areas where pre-approval is required • Sexual exploitation and abuse of beneficiaries • Inconsistent access to affected population across areas of control. • Limited availability and capacity of partners to deliver, diversify programmes and scale up (varies by sector) • COVID-19 outbreak amongst community and Humanitarian partners Fiduciary • Fraud/Corruption • Poor financial management by implementing partners • Theft and diversion of resources, access limitation or poor oversight. (...) Very likely Risk Mitigation – Category: High Risk Risk Mitigation Measure Risk (3) Deteriorating economic conditions • Regular engagement by the UN and INGOs on effect of economic crisis on humanitarian operations, developing operational plan (such as request conditions and requirements for waivers, collective advocacy, etc) • Implementing partners to review preparedness and response measures related to economic deterioration and operational response plans and updated regularly • Continued advocacy with relevant stakeholders (GoS counterparts, Central Bank of Syria) • Further advocacy to the donor community to expand support in increased number of people in need. Risk (5) Constraints to acquire timely clearances to program implementation Risks (7) Inconsistent access to affected population across areas of control. • Requests for consistent and timely clearance of assistance based on needs and identified priorities • Advocacy at the highest level are conducted regularly. • Improve support to the hub-level to ensure further decentralization of the project implementation Risk (10) Fraud/Corruption Risk (11) Poor financial management by implementing partners Risk (12) Theft / Diversion of resources • Periodic reporting on the progress • Stronger national NGO outreach and training on risk management • Stronger financial control requirement for partner programming • Continuous and consistent monitoring and updating performance index to identify problematic partners • Enhanced information sharing on fraud cases between key SHF Stakeholders • Enforce due diligence, capacity assessment/review, risk rating/ and compliance mechanism; • Successful promotion and rollout of Partner Performance Index (PPI) and its application Risk (9) and Risk (13) COVID- 19 outbreak amongst Humanitarian partners and community at large • Implement telecommuting and videoconferencing including work from home modality. • Medical evacuation capacity put in place and quarantine, isolation protocols for staffs ; Provision of office and home hygiene Items and Personal Protective Equipment • Prioritization of activities based on criticality of programme • Adaptation of operations ensuring that programme implementation does not put beneficiaries and partner staff at a higher risk of infection Risk (14) Hostilities and/or deterioration of security conditions • Regular Security Risk Management (SRM) assessments conducted for all areas and mitigation measures • Regular scenario building for areas that may be affected by hostilities and preparedness measures • Regular update from implementing partners on their safety and security measures Risk Mitigation – Category: Medium risk Risk Mitigation Measure Risk (1) Inadequate needs assessments or limited quality of assessment and data • Provide data collection and analysis of NGO and sector coverage and advocate for diversity of funding among multi partners in the targeted hotspots • Encourage all SHF recipients to actively partake in existing coordination mechanisms • Continuous outreach to promote all partners to take active part in sector systems • Continuous analysis and information sharing on partner presence and sectoral response coverage (ISC and Information Management Unit) Risk (2) Limited caseload coverage across sectors due to lack of timeliness, predictability of donors’ contribution or inadequacy of funding to reach critical mass. • Needs-based & evidence-based programming & triangulation of sources of data • Regular reporting & advocacy vis-à-vis all parties • Create a communications strategy to support ongoing dialogue on needs • Use of SHF to fill gaps and respond to emergencies Risk (4) Assistance creates protection risks or fuel tension • Protection Risk Assessment underpinning all sector strategies and all HRP Projects • Enhancements planned to mainstream context-sensitive planning in all interventions • Implementing partners to review data protection safeguards and gaps Risk (6) Sexual exploitation and abuse of beneficiaries • PSEA network established; Trainings; Awareness raising; Community-based complaint mechanisms; standard SOPs and MOUs with partners • Immediate investigations upon reports of SEA Risk (8) Limited availability and capacity of partners to deliver • Stronger national NGO outreach and training on Humanitarian principles and project management; • Diversify funding and outreach to new NGOs including enforce due diligence, capacity assessment/review, risk rating/ and compliance mechanism Risk (15) Ineffective and inefficient management and systems to support operations and meet performance standard • Successful promotion and rollout of PPI and its application to strengthen the Fund’s oversight and compliance measures • Systematization and expansion of sector’s role in the monitoring of SHF-funded projects • Continuous enhancement of various monitoring modalities including partners’ self-monitoring, peer-to-peer monitoring, and third-party monitoring • Ensure adequate staffing and support to SHF. • Continuous partner orientation and training sessions, including a module on risk management.
Language:English
Score: 810493.36 - https://www.unocha.org/sites/u...20Risk%20Management%202020.pdf
Data Source: un