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The meeting – Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms – was held against the backdrop of the significant and growing threat posed to Member States by the exploitation of ICT, in particular the Internet and social media, for terrorist purposes. (...) Reham Abdullah Salamah Media coverage Related media coverage Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session III) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session II) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session I) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session V) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session IV) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session III) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session II) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session I)     Front Page Article:  Special meeting of the Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee on Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms 16-00152a_web-image.png   Member States continue to face a significant and growing threat from the abuse of information and communication technologies (ICT), in particular the Internet and social media, for terrorist purposes. (...) Reham Abdullah Salamah Media coverage Related media coverage Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session III) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session II) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session I) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session V) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session IV) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session III) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session II) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session I)     Front Page Article: 
Language:English
Score: 450288 - https://www.un.org/securitycou...il/ctc/taxonomy/term/1070/feed
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This Agreement does not give rise to obligations in respect of acts which occurred before the date of application of the Agreement for the Member in question. 2. (...) In respect of this paragraph and paragraphs 3 and 4, copyright obligations with respect to existing works shall be solely determined under Article 18 of the Berne Convention (1971), and obligations with respect to the rights of producers of phonograms and performers in existing phonograms shall be determined solely under Article 18 of the Berne Convention (1971) as made applicable under paragraph 6 of Article 14 of this Agreement. 3. There shall be no obligation to restore protection to subject matter which on the date of application of this Agreement for the Member in question has fallen into the public domain. 4. In respect of any acts in respect of specific objects embodying protected subject matter which become infringing under the terms of legislation in conformity with this Agreement, and which were commenced, or in respect of which a significant investment was made, before the date of acceptance of the WTO Agreement by that Member, any Member may provide for a limitation of the remedies available to the right holder as to the continued performance of such acts after the date of application of this Agreement for that Member.
Language:English
Score: 449881.6 - https://www.wto.org/english/re...s_e/ai17_e/trips_art70_oth.pdf
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layout Description Eni pursues a communication strategy which reflects the Company’s respect of its stakeholders, who increasingly demand greater transparency and access to information, and testifies its commitment to establishing with them an open and trustworthy relationship. Eni has therefore striven to constantly improve its communication with respect to sustainability and corporate responsibility. (...) Clear reference is made to the Company’s support of Global Compact as well as more specifically with respect to labor standards and transparency and corruption .
Language:English
Score: 449584.03 - https://www.unglobalcompact.or.../create-and-submit/detail/6130
Data Source: un
The EU and its Member States reaffirm the obligation of all parties involved in armed conflicts to respect international humanitarian law m all circumstances and ensure respect for it. (...) The European Union is strongly committed to promoting respect for IHL as part of its wider commitment, laid down in its founding Treaties, to advancing respect for human dignity and for the principles of international law. (...) A more systematic and regular dialogue is crucial for enhancing respect for IHL. Therefore, the EU and its Member States strongly support the idea of establishing a regular, universal and voluntary mechanism, to strengthen respect for IHL auid allow for dialogue.
Language:English
Score: 449168.8 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...fs/statements/protocols/eu.pdf
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In particular there are two areas that we would want you to consider with respect to the first pillar. The first is the growing governance gap in labour protection. (...) With respect to the second pillar, the corporate responsibility to respect, there should be recognition within the Working Group that one of the greatest human rights impacts of business activity on human rights is through labour practices. (...) We would suggest that any practices be subject to critical examination with respect to whether they are actually consistent with “due diligence”.
Language:English
Score: 448790.5 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...iety/CouncilOfGlobalUnions.pdf
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A business that integrates respect and support for children into its strategy and operations generates benefits for children, society; and can generate real benefits for business as well. (...) POL ICY CO MM ITMENT D U E D ILIG EN CE RE ME DI AT IO N ACTIONS FOR BUSINESS Ten principles identify actions for all businesses to respect and support children’s rights. Principle 1 outlines three core actions to be taken to achieve this corporate responsibility to respect children’s rights – policy commitments, due diligence measures and remediation. It also encourages all businesses to go beyond respect for children’s rights to the next steps of supporting and promoting children’s rights.
Language:English
Score: 448602.5 - https://www.unicef.org/nepal/media/6216/file
Data Source: un
In that case, log sheets with respective fields ment maintenance and evolution. removed or marked as “not applicable” should be Example for full Location Log Sheet: Annex 1 created from the respective templates. (...) In practical situations, it would be e.g., the FTL’s the DAL (see next subsection) to link measurement task to select the most appropriate type with respect data with respective scenarios. to the actual situation. (...) If it can be reasonably expected to use the table below for construction of respective that log sheets will reach the point where they are files. collected and processed further in short time and Methodology for inter-operator and cross-border P2P money transfers 21     18     19     20     21     22     23     24     25     26     27     28          
Language:English
Score: 448602.5 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...s/files/basic-html/page23.html
Data Source: un
Respect for human rights tends to be seen as something necessary but basic, from which leading companies have already moved on to more innovative, leadership-oriented, collaborative initiatives. (...) These pervasive assumptions fail to understand: a) that implementing respect for human rights is an integral part of doing business, not something you do and then move on from; b) that implementing respect for human rights is not just a matter of compliance to be achieved simply through audit and data tracking, but instead requires capacity building, innovation, collaboration and leadership; c) that respect for human rights is not just a “do no harm” proposition, but drives positive change in people’s lives, with many positive outcomes for sustainable development; d) that this positive impact of respecting human rights can drive transformative change at scale, in particular through collaborative uses of leverage across value chains that have the power to improve the lives of millions of workers and community members; e) that respect for human rights must also permeate any and all other initiatives a company undertakes to contribute to the SDGs, from philanthropy to shared value initiatives, environmental projects to innovative financing, and workforce engagement to anti-corruption efforts; f) that respect for human rights by business is the essential key to unlock achievement of many SDGs, and without which they cannot be achieved. (...)  In what ways do we see this connection between respect for human rights and contributions to sustainable development playing out in practice today?
Language:English
Score: 448227.93 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...6/21_CaseStudiesUNGPs_SDGs.pdf
Data Source: un
Thus, to enable the modern state and its system of justice to duly respect such indigenous/tribal communities' traditional local rights, the local content of those rights as self-expression of such communities indigenous justice would need to be made known in such a manner that it can be respected in terms of the implementation of human rights and women's rights within the overall legal framework of the prevailing law, governance and justice. (...) (d) Establish for this purpose in each district or area where indigenous tribal peoples live an advisory body which has competence to understand both the indigenous content of the local indigenous/tribal life-heritages with their traditional rights and what culturally equal realisation of women's human rights in respect to diverse life-heritages would require. (e) Authorise such district/county level Advisory Council on Securing Equal Human Rights for Indigenous/Tribal Women with Equal Respect for Their Life-Heritages to advice the administration and courts on how human rights of district's indigenous tribal women can become secured equally in respect to their diverse life-heritages and to the diverse ways how their indigenous justice fulfils human rights. (...) (g) Secure that other half of the members of such district/county level Advisory Council on Securing Equal Human Rights for Indigenous/Tribal Women with Equal Respect for Their Life-Heritages are women competent to interpret how diverse aspects of human rights and women's rights recognised in CEDAW can become implemented equally in respect to different local indigenous/tribal life-heritages (h) Ensure that whenever indigenous/tribal women see that state's decisions, projects - including also those already decided -, unequal conditions of village decisions or any prevailing conditions violate their human rights under CEDAW without their free, prior and informed consent, they can apply the case to be considered in such Advisory Council of their district/county, which will recommend to administrations and courts what human rights of indigenous/tribal women require in respect to their life-heritages.
Language:English
Score: 448054.64 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/default/files/2022-02/13.doc
Data Source: un
Period for which effective The privileges and rights conferred by section 5 shall date from the date of registration in the United Kingdom and shall continue in force, subject to the provisions of section 14, for so long as such registration in the United Kingdom remains in force in respect of the goods for which the trade mark is registered in Vanuatu: Provided that no action for infringement of the trade mark shall be entertained in respect of any use of the trade mark prior to the date of the issue of the Certificate of Registration in Vanuatu. (...) Registered users Any person entered in the United Kingdom Register of Trade Marks under section 28 of the Trade Marks Act, 1938, of the United Kingdom as a registered user in respect of any goods of a trade mark in respect of which a Certificate of Registration under this Act is in force, may apply to be registered in Vanuatu as a registered user of the mark in respect of some or all of such goods, subject to any conditions or restrictions entered in the United Kingdom Register. 11. (...) SCHEDULE (section 12) The fees specified in the second column hereunder shall be payable in respect of the proceedings specified in the first column in relation thereto.
Language:English
Score: 448001.9 - https://www.wto.org/english/th..._e/vut_e/WTACCVUT14_LEG_36.pdf
Data Source: un