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In promoting respect for international law, it is important to avoid selectivity and double standards in the application of legal norms and principles. (...) Moreover, in promoting respect for international law, disputes must be settled peacefully in accordance with Chapter Six (VI) of the UN Charter. (...) For its part, ASEAN will continue to fully engage with all its partners to promote and strengthen respect for the rule of law globally. Thank you, Mr.
Language:English
Score: 390339.18 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...atements/rule_of_law/asean.pdf
Data Source: un
WTO | intellectual property (TRIPS) - Least-Developed Country Members — Obligations Under Article 70.9 of the TRIPS Agreement with Respect to Pharmaceutical Products WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION Home   |  About WTO   |  News & events   |  Trade topics   |  WTO membership   |  Documents & resources   |  External relations Contact us   |  Site map   |  A-Z   |  Search español   français home trade topics trips article 70.9 GENERAL COUNCIL WT/L/478 12 July 2002 Least-Developed Country Members — Obligations Under Article 70.9 of the TRIPS Agreement with Respect to Pharmaceutical Products Decision of 8 July 2002( 1 ) The General Council, Having regard to paragraphs 1, 3 and 4 of Article IX of the Marrakesh Agreement Establishing the World Trade Organization (the “WTO Agreement”); Conducting the functions of the Ministerial Conference in the interval between meetings pursuant to paragraph 2 of Article IV of the WTO Agreement; Noting the decision of the Council for TRIPS on the Extension of the Transition Period under Article 66.1 of the TRIPS Agreement for Least-Developed Country Members for Certain Obligations with respect to Pharmaceutical Products (IP/C/25) (the “Decision”), adopted by the Council for TRIPS at its meeting of 25–27 June 2002 pursuant to the instructions of the Ministerial Conference contained in paragraph 7 of the Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health (WT/MIN(01)/DEC/2) (the “Declaration”); Considering that obligations under paragraph 9 of Article 70 of the TRIPS Agreement, where applicable, should not prevent attainment of the objectives of paragraph 7 of the Declaration; Noting that, in light of the foregoing, exceptional circumstances exist justifying a waiver from paragraph 9 of Article 70 of the TRIPS Agreement with respect to pharmaceutical products in respect of least-developed country Members; Decides as follows: 1. The obligations of least-developed country Members under paragraph 9 of Article 70 of the TRIPS Agreement shall be waived with respect to pharmaceutical products until 1 January 2016. 2.
Language:English
Score: 390008.96 - https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/trips_e/art70_9_e.htm
Data Source: un
As of this date, anti-dumping actions are the same as those identified in respect of the Russian Federation, and operate at the level of the Eurasian Economic Union. 2 Bahrain, Kingdom of; Kuwait, the State of; Oman; Qatar; United Arab Emirates To avoid multiple-counting, the row for this Member reports numbers with asterisks, as the anti-dumping actions that it notified are the same as those identified in respect of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and operate at the level of the Gulf Cooperation Council. 3 Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia To avoid multiple-counting, the row for this Member reports numbers with asterisks, as the anti-dumping actions that it notified are the same as those identified in respect of South Africa and operate at the level of the Southern African Customs Union. 4 Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland became EU member States on 1 May 2004. (...) As of this date, anti-dumping actions are the same as those identified in respect of the Russian Federation, and operate at the level of the Eurasian Economic Union. 8 Russian Federation All anti-dumping actions identified in respect of the Russian Federation (which became a WTO Member on 22 August 2012) for 2011-2014 operated at the level of the Customs Union of the Eurasian Economic Community, i.e., also in respect of Belarus (non-WTO Member), and Kazakhstan (then non-WTO Member). All actions identified in respect of the Russian Federation for 2015 and thereafter operate at the level of the Eurasian Economic Union, i.e., also in respect of Armenia, Kyrgyz Republic, Kazakhstan (which became a WTO Member on 30 November 2015), and Belarus. 9 Saudi Arabia, Kingdom of All anti-dumping actions identified in respect of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia operate at the level of the Gulf Cooperation Council, i.e., also in respect of the Kingdom of Bahrain, the State of Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. 10 South Africa All anti-dumping actions notified by South Africa operate at the level of the Southern African Customs Union, i.e., also in respect of Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia.
Language:English
Score: 389983.13 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...Sectoral_MeasuresByRepMem.xlsx
Data Source: un
As of this date, anti-dumping actions are the same as those identified in respect of the Russian Federation, and operate at the level of the Eurasian Economic Union. 2 Bahrain, Kingdom of; Kuwait, the State of; Oman; Qatar; United Arab Emirates To avoid multiple-counting, the row for this Member reports numbers with asterisks, as the anti-dumping actions that it notified are the same as those identified in respect of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and operate at the level of the Gulf Cooperation Council. 10 South Africa All anti-dumping actions notified by South Africa operate at the level of the Southern African Customs Union, i.e., also in respect of Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia. 3 Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia To avoid multiple-counting, the row for this Member reports numbers with asterisks, as the anti-dumping actions that it notified are the same as those identified in respect of South Africa and operate at the level of the Southern African Customs Union. 4 Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland became EU member States on 1 May 2004. (...) As of this date, anti-dumping actions are the same as those identified in respect of the Russian Federation, and operate at the level of the Eurasian Economic Union. 9 Saudi Arabia, Kingdom of All anti-dumping actions identified in respect of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia operate at the level of the Gulf Cooperation Council, i.e., also in respect of the Kingdom of Bahrain, the State of Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. 8 Russian Federation All anti-dumping actions identified in respect of the Russian Federation (which became a WTO Member on 22 August 2012) for 2011-2014 operated at the level of the Customs Union of the Eurasian Economic Community, i.e., also in respect of Belarus (non-WTO Member), and Kazakhstan (then non-WTO Member). All actions identified in respect of the Russian Federation for 2015 and thereafter operate at the level of the Eurasian Economic Union, i.e., also in respect of Armenia, Kyrgyz Republic, Kazakhstan (which became a WTO Member on 30 November 2015), and Belarus. 5 European Union All anti-dumping actions notified by the European Union operate EU-wide, i.e., in respect of all EU member States, which do not notify individually.
Language:English
Score: 389983.13 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr..._Sectoral_MeasuresByRepMem.pdf
Data Source: un
There is no doubt that the international community must ensure the application of international humanitarian law, as provided for in the obligation "to respect and to ensure respect" for such norms as provided for in Article 1 common to the Geneva Conventions in all circumstances, to be able to respond to those new challenges. (...) This is a fundamental issue for all States Parties to the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and its Additional Protocols, in order to fulfill their obligations to respect and to ensure respect for the International Humanitarian Law in all circumstances. (...) We call on Parties to the Rome Statute to ratify the The high level Declaration of the General Assembly on the Rule of Law (24 September 2012), reaffirmed the obligation of all States and all parties to armed conflict to respect and ensure respect for international humanitarian law in all circumstances.
Language:English
Score: 389983.13 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...statements/protocols/celac.pdf
Data Source: un
This year we are focusing on the crucial importance of treating each other with respect and tolerance. Tolerance and respect are basic human values. (...) Leadership Dialogue: Treating Each Other with Respect and Tolerance | 9 DISCUSSION ACTIVITY Begin by asking staff: How do you define respect? (...) .A Tomas is not being respectful or tolerant. He could show respect by not pinching his nose, or by not commenting in a sarcastic manner.
Language:English
Score: 389737.4 - https://www.un.org/en/ethics/a.../pdfs/2014_Leaders%20Guide.pdf
Data Source: un
Chairman, The Non-Aligned Movement have been following this item with high interest and believes that respect for the rule of law at the national and international levels is essential to maintaining international peace and security and achieving socioeconomic development. (...) At the same time, the Non-Aligned Movement underscores the need for the United Nations Member States to fully respect the functions and powers of each principal organ of the U.N., in particular the General Assembly, and to maintain the balance among these organs within their respective Charter-based functions and powers. (...) The Movement reiterates the need for those activities to be undertaken 3 at the request of interested recipient Governments, strictly within the respective mandates of the United Nations funds and programmes.
Language:English
Score: 389606.71 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...statements/rule_of_law/nam.pdf
Data Source: un
The geographical co-ordinates referred to in this article are expressed in terms of the Australian Geodetic Datum 1966 (AGD 66) in respect of point U, and in terms of the World Geodetic System 1972 (WGS 72) in respect of points V and R1. (...) In the case of AGD 66, that reference shall be in respect of a spheroid having its centre at the centre of the Earth, and a major (equatorial) radius of 6,378,160 metres and a flattening of 100/29825. (...) IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned, being duly authorized by their respective Governments, have signed this Agreement.
Language:English
Score: 389603.54 - https://www.un.org/depts/los/L...LES/TREATIES/SLB-AUS1988SB.PDF
Data Source: un
The meeting – Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms – was held against the backdrop of the significant and growing threat posed to Member States by the exploitation of ICT, in particular the Internet and social media, for terrorist purposes. (...) Reham Abdullah Salamah Media coverage Related media coverage Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session III) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session II) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session I) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session V) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session IV) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session III) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session II) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session I)     Front Page Article:  Special meeting of the Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee on Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms 16-00152a_web-image.png   Member States continue to face a significant and growing threat from the abuse of information and communication technologies (ICT), in particular the Internet and social media, for terrorist purposes. (...) Reham Abdullah Salamah Media coverage Related media coverage Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session III) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session II) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session I) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session V) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session IV) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session III) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session II) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session I)     Front Page Article:  CTED delivers keynote address at 2nd World Internet Conference cted_worldinternetconference-e1456508521726.jpg CTED representative at the Forum   CTED delivered a keynote address at the 2nd World Internet Conference in Wuzhen, China.
Language:English
Score: 389498.68 - https://www.un.org/securitycou...il/ctc/taxonomy/term/1568/feed
Data Source: un
Furthermore, we must acknowledge that  tolerance,  pluralistic  tradition,  mutual  respect  and  the diversity of religions and beliefs promote human fraternity. Thus, it is imperative that we encourage activities  aimed  at  promoting  interreligious  and  intercultural dialogue in  order to  enhance peace  and social  stability,  respect for  diversity and mutual respect and to create, at the global level, and also at the regional, national and local levels, an environment conducive to peace and mutual understanding. (...) A culture of peace is a set of values, attitudes, traditions and modes of behaviour and ways of life based on: Respect for life, ending of violence and promotion and practice of non-violence through education, dialogue and cooperation; Full respect for the principles of sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of States and non-intervention in matters which are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any State, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and international law; Full respect for and promotion of all human rights and fundamental freedoms; Commitment to peaceful settlement of conflicts; Efforts to meet the developmental and environmental needs of present and future generations; Respect for and promotion of the right to development; Respect for and promotion of equal rights and opportunities for women and men; Respect for and promotion of the right of everyone to freedom of expression, opinion and information; Adherence to the principles of freedom, justice, democracy, tolerance, solidarity, cooperation, pluralism, cultural diversity, dialogue and understanding at all levels of society and among nations; and fostered by an enabling national and international environment conducive to peace.
Language:English
Score: 373546.2 - https://www.un.org/en/observances/human-fraternity
Data Source: un