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The geographical co-ordinates referred to in this article are expressed in terms of the Australian Geodetic Datum 1966 (AGD 66) in respect of point U, and in terms of the World Geodetic System 1972 (WGS 72) in respect of points V and R1. (...) In the case of AGD 66, that reference shall be in respect of a spheroid having its centre at the centre of the Earth, and a major (equatorial) radius of 6,378,160 metres and a flattening of 100/29825. (...) IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned, being duly authorized by their respective Governments, have signed this Agreement.
Language:English
Score: 443788 - https://www.un.org/depts/los/L...LES/TREATIES/SLB-AUS1988SB.PDF
Data Source: un
The meeting – Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms – was held against the backdrop of the significant and growing threat posed to Member States by the exploitation of ICT, in particular the Internet and social media, for terrorist purposes. (...) Reham Abdullah Salamah Media coverage Related media coverage Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session III) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session II) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session I) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session V) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session IV) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session III) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session II) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session I)     Front Page Article:  Special meeting of the Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee on Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms 16-00152a_web-image.png   Member States continue to face a significant and growing threat from the abuse of information and communication technologies (ICT), in particular the Internet and social media, for terrorist purposes. (...) Reham Abdullah Salamah Media coverage Related media coverage Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session III) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session II) Special meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session I) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (1 December 2016: Session V) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session IV) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session III) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session II) CTED-organized meeting: Preventing the exploitation of information and communication technologies (ICT) for terrorist purposes, while respecting human rights and fundamental freedoms (30 November 2016: Session I)     Front Page Article:  CTED delivers keynote address at 2nd World Internet Conference cted_worldinternetconference-e1456508521726.jpg CTED representative at the Forum   CTED delivered a keynote address at the 2nd World Internet Conference in Wuzhen, China.
Language:English
Score: 443772.07 - https://www.un.org/securitycou...il/ctc/taxonomy/term/1568/feed
Data Source: un
Schedule D in respect of Zoran Zigic lists 35 names of victims in relation to counts 1-3 (as opposed to 5 previously); 7 in relation to counts 6-7 (6 in the previous Indictment), and 19 in relation to counts11-13 (as opposed to 10 previously). 3. (...) Similar changes have also been made in respect of the other accused. 5. Replacing paragraph 27 of the previous Indictment which only addressed the alleged criminal responsibility of the accused under Article 7(1) of the Statute. 6. (...) This finding is also relevant in respect of Zoran Zigic’s similar argument raised in connection with counts 6-7. 8.
Language:English
Score: 443558.3 - https://www.icty.org/x/cases/kvocka/tdec/en/91108AI59969.htm
Data Source: un
Introduction to the Guiding Principles for the Implementation of the UN "Protect, Respect and Remedy" Framework | UN Global Compact All Participants Search Who We Are The SDGs Participation Take Action Engage Locally Explore Our Library About News Sign In Contact Us Explore our enhanced library Designed to help you find the resources you need to take the next step on your sustainability journey. (...) Access Resource First Webinar: Introduction to the Guiding Principles for the Implementation of the UN "Protect, Respect and Remedy" Framework (English) First Webinar: Introduction to the Guiding Principles for the Implementation of the UN "Protect, Respect and Remedy" Framework (English) Your browser does not support the audio element. Second Webinar: Introduction to the Guiding Principles for the Implementation of the UN "Protect, Respect and Remedy" Framework (English) Second Webinar: Introduction to the Guiding Principles for the Implementation of the UN "Protect, Respect and Remedy" Framework (English) Your browser does not support the audio element.
Language:English
Score: 443302.64 - https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/641
Data Source: un
Microsoft Word - AF Business Relationships - Concept Note.docx              1   CONCEPT  NOTE   Business   relationships   learning   dialogue:   Implementing   the   corporate   responsibility   to   respect  human  rights  beyond  supply  chain   Wednesday  18  November  -­‐  10am–11.20am   Room  XII,  Palais  des  Nations     Session  Focus   The   session  will   focus   on   the   implementation   of   the   corporate   responsibility   to   respect   human   rights   in   diverse   business   relationships   beyond   the   supply   chain,   including   among   others   in   mergers   and   acquisitions,   joint   ventures,   equity   investments,   franchises,   and   with   customers.   The   session   will   be   structured   around   three   key   areas   related   to   the   integration   of   respect   for   human   rights   into   business   relationships:  general  approaches;  leverage;  and  remedy.       (...) This  session  will  seek  to   explore   these   issues   and   draw   out   new   company   experiences   and   approaches   to   implementing   the   corporate  responsibility  to  respect  human  rights  in  business  relationships.      
Language:English
Score: 443212.16 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...ationshipsLearningDialogue.pdf
Data Source: un
In its resolution 8/7 (2008), the Human Rights Council supported the “Protect, Respect and Remedy” Framework developed by the Special Representative, and requested him to integrate a gender perspective throughout his work and give special attention to persons belonging to vulnerable groups, in particular children.1 However, children’s rights are not explicitly addressed in the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: Implementing the United Nations “Protect, Respect and Remedy” Framework. (...) The Principles are a result of the need for stronger recognition of children’s right on the business and human rights agenda and it provide business with a principled approach on how to respect and support children’s rights within their operations. (...) Other measures • Support NHRIs in their mandate to protect children’s rights from corporate violations; • Use voluntary initiatives to encourage business to respect children’s rights; • Ensure that all businesses have a clear understanding of their responsibility to respect child rights wherever they operate and provide them with guidance on how to go about respecting children’s rights; • Ensure that children and their families have a clear understanding that business has a responsibility to respect child rights where ever they operate; and collaborate with civil society to ensure children are protected from corporate violations.
Language:English
Score: 443166.9 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...bmissions/UNAndIGOs/UNICEF.pdf
Data Source: un
All countervailing actions identified in respect of the Russian Federation (which became a WTO Member on 22 August 2012) for 2011-2014 operated at the level of the Customs Union of the Eurasian Economic Community, i.e., also in respect of Belarus (non-WTO Member), and Kazakhstan (then non-WTO Member). All actions identified in respect of the Russian Federation for 2015 and thereafter operate at the level of the Eurasian Economic Union, i.e., also in respect of Armenia, Kyrgyz Republic, Kazakhstan (which became a WTO Member on 30 November 2015), and Belarus. (...) All countervailing actions notified by the European Union operate EU-wide, i.e., in respect of all EU member States, which do not notify individually.
Language:English
Score: 442777.2 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...ctoral_InitiationsByRepMem.pdf
Data Source: un
See footnotes for details. 1 Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia To avoid multiple-counting, the row for this Member reports numbers with asterisks, as the countervailing actions that it notified are the same as those identified in respect of South Africa and operate at the level of the Southern African Customs Union. 2 European Union All countervailing actions notified by the European Union operate EU-wide, i.e., in respect of all EU member States, which do not notify individually. (...) Because EU notifies actions on behalf of all of its member States, the numbers for the EU are not additionally reported in this row. 5 Russian Federation All countervailing actions identified in respect of the Russian Federation (which became a WTO Member on 22 August 2012) for 2011-2014 operated at the level of the Customs Union of the Eurasian Economic Community, i.e., also in respect of Belarus (non-WTO Member), and Kazakhstan (then non-WTO Member). All actions identified in respect of the Russian Federation for 2015 and thereafter operate at the level of the Eurasian Economic Union, i.e., also in respect of Armenia, Kyrgyz Republic, Kazakhstan (which became a WTO Member on 30 November 2015), and Belarus. 6 South Africa All countervailing actions notified by South Africa operate at the level of the Southern African Customs Union, i.e., also in respect of Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia.
Language:English
Score: 442777.2 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...toral_InitiationsByRepMem.xlsx
Data Source: un
Furthermore, we must acknowledge that  tolerance,  pluralistic  tradition,  mutual  respect  and  the diversity of religions and beliefs promote human fraternity. Thus, it is imperative that we encourage activities  aimed  at  promoting  interreligious  and  intercultural dialogue in  order to  enhance peace  and social  stability,  respect for  diversity and mutual respect and to create, at the global level, and also at the regional, national and local levels, an environment conducive to peace and mutual understanding. (...) A culture of peace is a set of values, attitudes, traditions and modes of behaviour and ways of life based on: Respect for life, ending of violence and promotion and practice of non-violence through education, dialogue and cooperation; Full respect for the principles of sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of States and non-intervention in matters which are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any State, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and international law; Full respect for and promotion of all human rights and fundamental freedoms; Commitment to peaceful settlement of conflicts; Efforts to meet the developmental and environmental needs of present and future generations; Respect for and promotion of the right to development; Respect for and promotion of equal rights and opportunities for women and men; Respect for and promotion of the right of everyone to freedom of expression, opinion and information; Adherence to the principles of freedom, justice, democracy, tolerance, solidarity, cooperation, pluralism, cultural diversity, dialogue and understanding at all levels of society and among nations; and fostered by an enabling national and international environment conducive to peace.
Language:English
Score: 410981.6 - https://www.un.org/en/observances/human-fraternity
Data Source: un
Furthermore, we must acknowledge that  tolerance,  pluralistic  tradition,  mutual  respect  and  the diversity of religions and beliefs promote human fraternity. Thus, it is imperative that we encourage activities  aimed  at  promoting  interreligious  and  intercultural dialogue in  order to  enhance peace  and social  stability,  respect for  diversity and mutual respect and to create, at the global level, and also at the regional, national and local levels, an environment conducive to peace and mutual understanding. (...) A culture of peace is a set of values, attitudes, traditions and modes of behaviour and ways of life based on: Respect for life, ending of violence and promotion and practice of non-violence through education, dialogue and cooperation; Full respect for the principles of sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of States and non-intervention in matters which are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any State, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and international law; Full respect for and promotion of all human rights and fundamental freedoms; Commitment to peaceful settlement of conflicts; Efforts to meet the developmental and environmental needs of present and future generations; Respect for and promotion of the right to development; Respect for and promotion of equal rights and opportunities for women and men; Respect for and promotion of the right of everyone to freedom of expression, opinion and information; Adherence to the principles of freedom, justice, democracy, tolerance, solidarity, cooperation, pluralism, cultural diversity, dialogue and understanding at all levels of society and among nations; and fostered by an enabling national and international environment conducive to peace.
Language:English
Score: 410981.6 - https://www.un.org/en/node/120954
Data Source: un