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The rafts’ pilots say they have no choice. “Crossing the river this way is very dangerous but we have to do it,” says Omer Khan, who operates one of the rafts. “If we stop, people across the river will starve to death.” UNHCR through its partners has now used the make-shift rafts to deliver more than 350 kits of plastic mats, blankets and cooking sets and other non-food items to the far side of the swollen river. (...) “We manufactured four rafts – two each for Matta and Kabal Tehsil – to deliver non-food items to the stranded people across the Swat River – fighting with the merciless waves!”
Language:English
Score: 1986742.6 - https://www.unhcr.org/hk/en/97...-is-a-will-there-is-a-way.html
Data Source: un
Unable to pay to cross the Naf River, which forms the border, refugees were building rafts from whatever materials they could find, such as bamboo poles and jerrycans tied together with rope and covered with plastic sheets, UNHCR spokesperson William Spindler told a press briefing at the Palais des Nations on Friday. (...) The raft carried 34 people, more than half of them children. Paddling with plates attached to bamboo sticks, it took them four hours to cross the three-kilometre-wide river to reach Bangladesh. At least 130 Rohingya refugees are known to have died at sea during the perilous journey.
Language:English
Score: 1845618.8 - https://www.unhcr.org/news/lat...e-bangladesh-flimsy-rafts.html
Data Source: un
Unable to pay to cross the Naf River, which forms the border, refugees were building rafts from whatever materials they could find, such as bamboo poles and jerrycans tied together with rope and covered with plastic sheets, UNHCR spokesperson William Spindler told a press briefing at the Palais des Nations on Friday. (...) The raft carried 34 people, more than half of them children. Paddling with plates attached to bamboo sticks, it took them four hours to cross the three-kilometre-wide river to reach Bangladesh. At least 130 Rohingya refugees are known to have died at sea during the perilous journey.
Language:English
Score: 1845618.8 - https://www.unhcr.org/uk/news/...e-bangladesh-flimsy-rafts.html
Data Source: un
Unable to pay to cross the Naf River, which forms the border, refugees were building rafts from whatever materials they could find, such as bamboo poles and jerrycans tied together with rope and covered with plastic sheets, UNHCR spokesperson William Spindler told a press briefing at the Palais des Nations on Friday. (...) The raft carried 34 people, more than half of them children. Paddling with plates attached to bamboo sticks, it took them four hours to cross the three-kilometre-wide river to reach Bangladesh. At least 130 Rohingya refugees are known to have died at sea during the perilous journey.
Language:English
Score: 1845618.8 - https://www.unhcr.org/en-au/ne...e-bangladesh-flimsy-rafts.html
Data Source: un
Umananda Pathori Floods in the Brahmaputra river, one of the largest rivers in the world, cause massive loss of lives, livestock, crops, and properties every year in India’s northeast. (...) One of these areas is the Majuli river island, the world’s largest such island, located in the mid-stream of the Brahmaputra river in Assam. (...) “It was a compulsion for them because their habitation is near a river. They can understand the behavior of rivers very well,” said Mr.
Language:English
Score: 1800704 - https://www.undrr.org/news/ind...ion-practices-response-climate
Data Source: un
UNHCR - Home-made rafts arriving from Myanmar / Refugee population density soaring Donate Do you need help? (...) Using paddles made of bamboo and plastic debris some of these rafts made it to Shahporir Dwip in Bangladesh, a journey of about four hours. The Naf river estuary between the two countries is about three kilometres wide at this point.
Language:English
Score: 1759818.8 - https://www.unhcr.org/uk/news/...opulation-density-soaring.html
Data Source: un
UNHCR - Home-made rafts arriving from Myanmar / Refugee population density soaring Donate Do you need help? (...) Using paddles made of bamboo and plastic debris some of these rafts made it to Shahporir Dwip in Bangladesh, a journey of about four hours. The Naf river estuary between the two countries is about three kilometres wide at this point.
Language:English
Score: 1759818.8 - https://www.unhcr.org/news/bri...opulation-density-soaring.html
Data Source: un
Create growth, preserve nature Authentic and green tourism off the beaten tracks in Albania’s Vjosa river region Albania is a dream tourism destination. (...) Përmet is the second principal attraction in the region, known for its food (several restaurants being members of the Slow Food movement ), river rafting, outdoor excursions and traditional Saze music. In 2019, the town had over 13,000 persons visiting, more than the number of its own 10,000 residents. The Vjosa river, which flows through Përmet, is said to be “the last wild river in Europe” receiving global attention even by celebrities such as actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio , who voiced concerns over preserving the wildlife of the intact river and the unspoilt ecosystem, one of the few that still exist in Europe.
Language:English
Score: 1722028.3 - https://www.ilo.org/budapest/w...WCMS_771797/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
There was a huge forest of deciduous broad-leaved trees along the river. I rediscovered the link among forests, rivers and the ocean. (...) The four major civilizations in the world originated in river basins. Civilization will perish if you destroy the river basin environment. In Japan, 35,000 rivers are flowing into the Sea of Japan and the Pacific Ocean.
Language:English
Score: 1640563.3 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2...ple-sustainable-ocean-business
Data Source: un
Food and Livelihood Security The Nagara River is home to a thriving inland fishery industry that centers on the ayu, accounting for the second greatest yield among all rivers in Japan. (...) Repeated flood of the Nagara River brought fertile soil and sand to agricultural lands along the river. (...) In summer, children enjoy swimming, some people enjoy ayu fishing and some people enjoy rafting or river climbing in the Nagara River and its tributary.
Language:English
Score: 1632702.8 - https://www.fao.org/giahs/giah...ystem/detailed-information/ar/
Data Source: un