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Hence the PM/w ratio falls less and abstract labor remains relatively affordable If capital is scarce (in both countries), the high-σ country specializes in the routine intensive sector Archanskaia, Van Biesebroeck, Willmann CA in routine input production 14 / 29 2. (...) Hence the PM/w ratio falls less and abstract labor remains relatively affordable If capital is scarce (in both countries), the high-σ country specializes in the routine intensive sector Archanskaia, Van Biesebroeck, Willmann CA in routine input production 14 / 29 2. (...) The model pattern of comparative advantage Intuition from labor adjustment Extra K can only be deployed in the production of routine tasks, freeing up labor to be redeployed in abstract tasks ∆La = −∆Lm > 0 ∆La is absorbed by shifting the output ratio towards the non-routine intensive sector This adjustment is easier and goes furthest in the high-σ country that is the key property of σ in the CES production function: there is less of a productivity penalty if factor ratios move away from equality For product markets to clear, the relative price of the non-routine intensive good falls (or increases less), relative to the low-σ country The high-σ country becomes an exporter of the non-routine intensive good the factor price ratio w/Pm equalizes through a divergence in the K/L ratio in routine production Archanskaia, Van Biesebroeck, Willmann CA in routine input production 17 / 29 2.
Language:English
Score: 886485.2 - https://www.wto.org/english/re...e/wkshop17_e/biesebroeck_e.pdf
Data Source: un
Nepal substantially revived routine immunization coverage for DTP3 from 84% in 2020 to 91% in 2021. (...) In India, periodic intensification of routine immunization is carried out through ‘Mission Indradhanush’. (...) Myanmar conducted an evaluation of its routine immunization programme last month and has drawn up a plan to revive routine immunization coverage with support of WHO, UNICEF, Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance, and other partners and non-governmental organizations.
Language:English
Score: 874497.2 - https://www.who.int/southeasta...ack-to-pre-covid-19-times--who
Data Source: un
Guidance Note 1 WHO/UNICEF Guidance Note (Oct 10, 2011) Criteria to determine if a given vaccination is a routine or supplemental dose Introduction: While there are a multitude of strategies that can be used to deliver immunization services, there are only two types of doses that can be given -- routine or supplemental. (...) Today, however, with the implementation of Periodic Intensification of Routine Immunization (PIRI) activities this distinction has become blurred and some campaign-style activities provide supplemental and routine doses simultaneously. (...) This clarification is important to ensure that the necessary recording and reporting practices are planned and properly implemented, and that in turn, the accuracy and reliability of reported national routine coverage is improved. Routine Dose Criteria: All of the following 3 criteria must be met in order for a vaccination to be defined and counted as a routine dose. 1.
Language:English
Score: 873513.3 - https://www.who.int/immunizati...cination_doses_oct_10_2011.pdf
Data Source: un
The current update process for Recommendation ITU-R M.1457, put in place at the first meeting of WP 8F (7-10 March 2000, Geneva) was intended to enable the efficient update of minor routine modifications to the existing radio interfaces. It is now apparent that a review of this process is required to allow for non-routine major enhancements and also emerging technology changes. 2 Distinguishing between routine minor updates and non-routine updates Working Party 8F agreed that there is a difference between what can be called routine minor updates to the technologies and non-routine updates. (...) It has been suggested that Recommendation ITU-R M.1455 (IMT-2000 radio interface key characteristics) could be used as the technical basis to enable WP 8F to determine the distinction between routine minor and non-routine updates. One possibility is that if an input to Recommendation ITU-R M.1457 is consistent with the parameters within Recommendation ITU-R M.1455, it can be considered a routine minor update.
Language:English
Score: 872084.5 - https://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu...ves/rsg/lcce/rsg8/082e_ww9.doc
Data Source: un
Routine registration approaches can be leveraged and tweaked. (...) Encompassing a greater focus on shocks, hazards and stresses within routine targeting (systems building and design tweaks) Such a focus can be included in routine programming, enhancing the resilience of beneficiaries’ ex-ante and strengthening routine social protection. (...) They stressed the importance of routine systems building (increasing routine transfer values) to lay the foundations for shock response.
Language:English
Score: 866624.3 - https://www.unicef.org/media/1...cal%20Note%20-%20Targeting.pdf
Data Source: un
The introduction of Injectable Polio Vaccine (IPV) into routine immunisation schedules is a critical step to achieve a lasting Polio free world. (...) At least one dose of IPV should be given to children in addition to multiple doses of OPV as part of routine immunisation activities. Should the child continue to receive OPV after receiving IPV, when offered in the future? (...) Roles and responsibilities Political leaders Mobilise communities for IPV introduction and routine immunisation Sensitise communities on the benefits of immunisation Advocate for resources to strengthen routine immunisation and IPV introduction Monitor immunisation activities Religious leaders Mobilise communities for IPV introduction and routine immunisation Sensitise congregations on the benefits of immunisation Cultural / traditional leaders Mobilise communities for IPV introduction and routine immunisation Sensitise communities on the benefits of immunisation Civil societies Sensitise communities on the benefits of immunisation Advocate for resources to strengthen routine immunisation and IPV introduction Monitor immunisation services Service clubs Sensitise communities on the benefits of immunisation Mobilise resources to strengthen routine immunisation Provide resource persons and equipment Empower communities to demand for immunisation services Strengthen existing social structures to mobilise communities for immunisation Development Partners Provide technical support and financial support for immunisation services Media Sensitise communities on the benefits of immunisation Disseminate immunisation related information to the public Monitor and report on immunisation services Mobilise communities for IPV introduction and routine immunisation Professional bodies Organise in service training on immunisation Support the immunisation programme by providing scientific evidence Line ministries Local Government, Gender - Allocate resources from local revenue for immunisation - Ensure utilisation of the existing local structure (Local Councils, Parish Chiefs, Sub County Chiefs, Community Development Officers, Health Assistants, District Education Officers) to strengthen mobilisation and advocacy for routine immunisation Security (Army, Police, Prisons) Mobilise communities Provide resource persons and equipment Maintain security for health workers during immunisation campaigns Support DHTs to follow up defaulters and resistant groups for immunisation Polio is a highly infectious and dangerous disease that causes paralysis, lameness or death.
Language:English
Score: 865889.3 - https://www.unicef.org/uganda/...IPV%20Polio%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf
Data Source: un
With vaccines at the forefront of everyone’s minds, we must also remember the critical role that routine vaccines for children play in protecting children.  (...) "Routine vaccines in childhood have eliminated these diseases from many countries. (...) This includes making sure that any redirection of resources from routine immunization services do not create bottlenecks for families to access and receive routine vaccine services for children.
Language:English
Score: 865889.3 - https://www.unicef.org/northma...-continue-sustain-high-routine
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Article Routine immunization for children in the Philippines Learn about routine vaccines that children need and the diseases they prevent UNICEF Philippines UNICEF Philippines/2019/Shehzad Noorani 28 April 2021 Vaccines protect children from life-threatening diseases, saving millions of lives each year. For routine vaccines to be effective, children need to complete the required doses according to schedule from the time they are born until they are one year old. (...) Routine vaccines are provided by the Government for free in public health centers and facilities.  
Language:English
Score: 865488 - https://www.unicef.org/philipp...unization-children-philippines
Data Source: un
All children should be immunised against Measles at 9 months during routine immunisation. The Measles vaccine is SAFE, EFFECTIVE and FREE. (...) Immunising our children against Measles is important because: • More than 80% of districts in Uganda have not achieved 90% Measles immunisation coverage which is required to interrupt the Measles virus transmission • Unimmunised children are at risk of getting Measles because of low routine immunisation coverage • Measles is highly infectious and spreads very fast among unimmunised children • Measles is still one of the leading causes of death among children in Uganda • Pockets of Measles outbreaks are still being reported by some districts in Uganda and hence pose a big threat to Ugandan children 4 Measles Q & A Booklet Political leaders • Mobilise communities for routine immunisation • Sensitise communities on the benefits of immunisation • Advocate for resources to strengthen routine immunisation service delivery • Monitor immunisation activities to ensure that people get quality services Religious leaders • Mobilise communities for routine immunisation • Sensitise congregations and the communities on the benefits of immunisation Cultural / Traditional leaders • Mobilise communities for routine immunisation • Sensitise communities on the benefits of immunisation Civil Societies • Sensitise the communities on the benefits of immunisation • Advocate for resources to strengthen routine immunisation service delivery • Monitor immunisation services to ensure that people get quality services. (...) Rotary, Lions) • Sensitise the communities on the benefits of immunisation • Mobilise resources to strengthen routine immunisation service delivery • Provide resource persons and equipment to support immunisation service delivery • Empower communities to demand for immunisation services • Strengthen existing social structures to mobilise communities for immunisation Development Partners • Provide technical and financial support for immunisation activities Media • Sensitise the communities on the benefits of immunisation • Disseminate immunisation information to the public • Monitor and report on immunisation services • Mobilise communities for routine immunisation Professional Bodies • Organise in-service training on immunisation services • Support the immunisation program by providing scientific evidence on vaccine preventable diseases Line ministries Ministry of Education and Sports • Enable health workers to reach eligible children in schools • Ensure sustainability of the immunisation programme through updating the health training curricula 6 Measles Q & A Booklet Ministry of Local Government & Ministry of Gender, Labour & Social Development • Allocate resources from local revenue to support immunisation service delivery • Ensure utilisation of the existing local structures (Local Councils, Parish Chiefs, Sub County Chiefs, Community Development Officers, Health Assistants and District Education Officers) to strengthen mobilisation and advocacy for routine immunisation Security (Army, Police, Prisons) • Mobilise their communities • Provide resource persons and equipment to support immunisation service delivery • Support the DHTs to follow up defaulters and resistant groups who are avoiding immunisation services 7Measles Q & A Booklet Notes: 8 Measles Q & A Booklet Notes:
Language:English
Score: 863885.7 - https://www.unicef.org/uganda/...Uganda%20measles%20booklet.pdf
Data Source: un
DHMOSH - PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ROUTINE QUARANTINE TCC/PCC 29 JULY 2020 1 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF QUARANTINE PERIOD OF UNIFORMED PERSONNEL1 29 July 2020 INTRODUCTION To reduce the risk of introduction of COVID-19 from one country to another, TCCs/PCCs should implement a 14-day quarantine2 period pre-deployment in the TCC/PCC country, and then another 14-day quarantine period post-deployment within the mission area; as well as upon exit of the mission area accordingly if necessary. This document provides guidance to TCCs/PCCs on the principles regarding the quarantine period that is to be implemented for such uniformed personnel. MINIMUM ELEMENTS OF ROUTINE QUARANTINE FOR UNIFORMED PERSONNEL The following provides the minimum elements that must be implemented throughout this routine quarantine period. (...) DHMOSH - PUBLIC HEALTH UNIT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ROUTINE QUARANTINE TCC/PCC 29 JULY 2020 2 • Maintain at least 1-2 meter space between individuals at all times through social distancing strategies and other environmental engineering solutions. • Symptoms of individuals under quarantine should be closely monitored.
Language:English
Score: 863705.9 - https://www.un.org/sites/un2.u...d_postdeploymentquarantine.pdf
Data Source: un