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(b) ensure the maintenance of public order and security in the Free Territory, Article 3 — Demilitarization and Neutrality 1. (...) No armed forces, except upon direction of the Security Council, shall be allowed in the Free Territory. 3. (...) In order to preserve public order and security in accordance with the Statute, the Constitution and the laws of the Free Territory, the Government of the Free Territory shall be empowered to maintain a police force and security services. 2.
Language:English
Score: 839608.7 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-211880/
Data Source: un
While addressing this issue, the Committee took into consideration the nature and scope of existing NSAs, United Nations Security Council resolution 984, and declarations of nuclear-weapon States concerning protocols to nuclear-weapon-free zone treaties and their interpretative statements. (...) NSAs and Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones The issue of security assurances was not fully resolved during the negotiations of the 1968 Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). (...) Instead, action was taken in unilateral statements and in the Security Council. Nuclear-weapon-free-zones: Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Treaty of Tlatelolco); African Nuclear-Weapon -Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Pelindaba); South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga); Treaty on the South-East Asia Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone (Bangkok Treaty); Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia; Mongolia’s Nuclear-Weapon-Free Status; and Antarctic Treaty.
Language:English
Score: 824246.9 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...and-NSA-Fact-Sheet-Jul2017.pdf
Data Source: un
Middle East Weapons of Mass Destruction Free Zone | Programmes | UNIDIR Skip to main content Main navigation About About Us Our People Our Governance Our Funding Join Our Team Contact Us Programmes Weapons of Mass Destruction Security and Technology Conventional Arms and Ammunition Gender and Disarmament Middle East Weapons of Mass Destruction Free Zone Managing Exits from Armed Conflict Space Security Publications Digital Hub Gender & Disarmament Hub Cyber Policy Portal Disarmament Course 2022 ME WMDFZ Hub Events Newsroom search Search By year - All - 1958 1962 1974 1975 1978 1980 1981 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1997 1999 2000 2003 2005 2006 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Search Toggle navigation Middle East Weapons of Mass Destruction Free Zone The ME WMDFZ Project is carried out with funding by the European Union The Middle East Weapons of Mass Destruction Free Zone (ME WMDFZ) Project, which will be carried out over three years, has four objectives:  To fill an important research gap related to how the issue of the ME WMDFZ has evolved over time, including lessons for current and future prospects;  To build analytic capacity to support new thinking on regional security issues and the zone, including drawing on lessons from the establishment of other regional nuclear free zones;  To collect ideas and develop new proposals on how to move forward on this issue;  And to foster inclusive dialogue among experts and policymakers on regional security issues and the zone, which in turn could contribute to ongoing multilateral processes. (...) To subscribe to the ME WMDFZ newsletter, please enter your contact information below * indicates required Email Address * First Name Last Name Affiliation                   Current Research publications Events Narratives on the Middle East Weapons of Mass Destruction-Free Zone: Historical accounts, drivers, and themes Perspectives, Drivers, and Objectives for the Middle East WMD-Free Zone: Voices from the Region المرأة العربية في مجال الأمن الدولي ونزع السلاح Factsheet: Arab Women in International Security and Disarmament From the Iran nuclear deal to a Middle East Zone? Lessons from the JCPOA for an ME WMDFZ Nuclear verification in a Middle East WMD-Free Zone: Lessons from Past Verification Cases and Other Precedents The ways and means in which nuclear-weapon-free zones contribute to regional peace, stability and other political objectives Pathways Forward for the ME WMDFZ Process and 2020 NPT Review Conference: Conference Report Disarmament Forum: The Middle East US-Russia Dialogue ME WMDFZ Pagination Page 1 Next page ›› NPT Side Event: Narratives on the Middle East WMD-Free Zone: Historical accounts, drivers, and themes Roundtable Discussion: Means of Delivery in the Context of a Middle East WMD-Free Zone Addressing Chemical and Biological Weapons in the Context of a Middle East WMD-Free Zone Perspectives, Drivers and Objectives for the Middle East WMD Free Zone Development and Cooperation on Nuclear Research and Energy in the Middle East The Middle East WMD-Free Zone: Reflecting on the Past and Looking to the Future Advancing the role of women in international security: Views from the Middle East Launch Event: Middle East WMDFZ Timeline Advancing the role of women in international security in the Middle East From the Iran nuclear deal to a Middle East Zone?
Language:English
Score: 819411.9 - https://www.unidir.org/program...ons-mass-destruction-free-zone
Data Source: un
That support was not, however, a clear recognition of its single-State nuclear-weapon-free zone status nor did it provide the legally binding security assurances that are provided to traditional nuclear-weapon-free zones. (...) This understanding formed the basis of General Assembly resolution 53/77 D , entitled “Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapon-free status”, adopted in 1998 without a vote. (...) After resuming contact and talks with the five nuclear-weapon States in 2011 and 2012 regarding its nuclear-weapon-free status, on 17 September 2012 Mongolia and the five States signed parallel declarations at United Nations Headquarters concerning security assurances.
Language:English
Score: 818543 - https://www.un.org/nwfz/ar/con...ias-nuclear-weapon-free-status
Data Source: un
That support was not, however, a clear recognition of its single-State nuclear-weapon-free zone status nor did it provide the legally binding security assurances that are provided to traditional nuclear-weapon-free zones. (...) This understanding formed the basis of General Assembly resolution 53/77 D , entitled “Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapon-free status”, adopted in 1998 without a vote. (...) After resuming contact and talks with the five nuclear-weapon States in 2011 and 2012 regarding its nuclear-weapon-free status, on 17 September 2012 Mongolia and the five States signed parallel declarations at United Nations Headquarters concerning security assurances.
Language:English
Score: 818543 - https://www.un.org/nwfz/fr/con...ias-nuclear-weapon-free-status
Data Source: un
That support was not, however, a clear recognition of its single-State nuclear-weapon-free zone status nor did it provide the legally binding security assurances that are provided to traditional nuclear-weapon-free zones. (...) This understanding formed the basis of General Assembly resolution 53/77 D , entitled “Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapon-free status”, adopted in 1998 without a vote. (...) After resuming contact and talks with the five nuclear-weapon States in 2011 and 2012 regarding its nuclear-weapon-free status, on 17 September 2012 Mongolia and the five States signed parallel declarations at United Nations Headquarters concerning security assurances.
Language:English
Score: 818543 - https://www.un.org/nwfz/ru/con...ias-nuclear-weapon-free-status
Data Source: un
That support was not, however, a clear recognition of its single-State nuclear-weapon-free zone status nor did it provide the legally binding security assurances that are provided to traditional nuclear-weapon-free zones. (...) This understanding formed the basis of General Assembly resolution 53/77 D , entitled “Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapon-free status”, adopted in 1998 without a vote. (...) After resuming contact and talks with the five nuclear-weapon States in 2011 and 2012 regarding its nuclear-weapon-free status, on 17 September 2012 Mongolia and the five States signed parallel declarations at United Nations Headquarters concerning security assurances.
Language:English
Score: 818543 - https://www.un.org/nwfz/es/con...ias-nuclear-weapon-free-status
Data Source: un
That support was not, however, a clear recognition of its single-State nuclear-weapon-free zone status nor did it provide the legally binding security assurances that are provided to traditional nuclear-weapon-free zones. (...) This understanding formed the basis of General Assembly resolution 53/77 D , entitled “Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapon-free status”, adopted in 1998 without a vote. (...) After resuming contact and talks with the five nuclear-weapon States in 2011 and 2012 regarding its nuclear-weapon-free status, on 17 September 2012 Mongolia and the five States signed parallel declarations at United Nations Headquarters concerning security assurances.
Language:English
Score: 818543 - https://www.un.org/nwfz/ru/node/666
Data Source: un
That support was not, however, a clear recognition of its single-State nuclear-weapon-free zone status nor did it provide the legally binding security assurances that are provided to traditional nuclear-weapon-free zones. (...) This understanding formed the basis of General Assembly resolution 53/77 D , entitled “Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapon-free status”, adopted in 1998 without a vote. (...) After resuming contact and talks with the five nuclear-weapon States in 2011 and 2012 regarding its nuclear-weapon-free status, on 17 September 2012 Mongolia and the five States signed parallel declarations at United Nations Headquarters concerning security assurances.
Language:English
Score: 818543 - https://www.un.org/nwfz/ar/node/666
Data Source: un
That support was not, however, a clear recognition of its single-State nuclear-weapon-free zone status nor did it provide the legally binding security assurances that are provided to traditional nuclear-weapon-free zones. (...) This understanding formed the basis of General Assembly resolution 53/77 D , entitled “Mongolia’s international security and nuclear-weapon-free status”, adopted in 1998 without a vote. (...) After resuming contact and talks with the five nuclear-weapon States in 2011 and 2012 regarding its nuclear-weapon-free status, on 17 September 2012 Mongolia and the five States signed parallel declarations at United Nations Headquarters concerning security assurances.
Language:English
Score: 818543 - https://www.un.org/nwfz/fr/node/666
Data Source: un