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Dr Francois Bonnici, Director of the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship, talks about his experiences in Namibia and implementing the skin-to-skin-care that puts newborns in direct touch with their mother’s skin, which has shown improved survival rates. (...) Stigma is a major barrier, so the Leprosy Action group used research on community-seeking behavior to help them design community skin health programmes, integrating leprosy care with general health information and care to reduce the stigma. (...) She explains integrated community case management of diarrhoea, malaria and pneumonia, and how private shop owners have been able to provide the needed diagnostics and treatments.
Language:English
Score: 1563451.6 - https://www.who.int/tdr/news/2018/first-tdr-global-talks/en/
Data Source: un
UNITED NATIONS CCP
The author explains that, for the past five years, he suffers from "bumps" on his skin. The prison authorities allegedly failed to take any action in this respect until early 1992, when a member of the Jamaica Council for Human Rights intervened on his behalf. (...) Furthermore, the author complains that he suffers from another skin disease and from recurrent stomach pains, which, according to him, are caused by the inadequacy of the prison diet. (...) He also stated that an appointment was made to see a skin doctor in February 1994, but that prison officials refused to transport him without payment.
Language:English
Score: 1353331.25 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...DS=CCPR/C/57/D/527/1993&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Try these tips to make sure you are looking after your skin well and giving your body the chance to reduce the number and severity of breakouts. Did you know: We lose 30,000 to 40,000 dead skin cells off the surface of our skin every minute. Better wash our bodies properly everyday so our skin doesn’t get clogged! 6 TIPS TO BETTER MANAGE PIMPLES & ACNE • Keep your hands clean and finger nails trimmed and clean. • Washing your skin is important to remove excess oil and dead skin cells which can clog your pores.
Language:English
Score: 1333395.7 - https://www.unicef.org/maldive...Up%20Well%20-%20For%20Boys.pdf
Data Source: un
TOPIC PAPER ON FOOD WASTE RELATED TO STANDARDS
In the last year, some shops have started selling products called “ugly fruit” which are products of all sorts of shapes, sizes, colours and exterior defects. (...) The 10 per cent tolerance covers all malformations, serious skin and colour defects as well as defects not meeting the minimum requirements but not affecting edibility such as ECE/CTCS/WP.7/GE.1/2016/10 3 slight damage, soiling, lack of freshness. (...) This category would allow shape, colour and skin defects that do not affect the eating quality of the produce.
Language:English
Score: 1276876.1 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce.../CTCS/WP.7/GE.1/2016/10&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
SHOWER AND EYE/FACE BATH
Diphoterine is a compound developed in France as an eye/skin chemical splash water-based decontamination solution. (...) Its hypertonicity impedes chemical tissue penetration and may remove some amount of skin/cornea-absorbed toxicants not already bound to tissue receptors. (...) Diphoterine and its acid/alkali decontamination residues are not irritating to the eyes or skin; it is essentially nontoxic. Diphoterine can prevent eye/skin burns following chemical splashes and results in nearly immediate pain relief.
Language:English
Score: 1269087.4 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...RANS/WP.15/AC.2/2017/36&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Rosado Pinto GARD Coordinator GARD General Assembly Istanbul 2008 GARD Portugal - Background Focus on: Country needs analysis in CRD Situation of surveillance, prevention and control of CRD Collaboration with the Ministry of Health Promotion of national and international partnerships GARD Portugal – Collaborations Parties A – Active Members 33Representatives from the Ministry of Health 77 Representatives from professional associations and scientific societies 33Chronic respiratory experts and public health experts 1212B – Observers from the private sector 22C – World GARD participants 22Professional Authorities 33Scientific and researcher academic groups 11Non-governmental social organizations 44Representatives from patient groups Activities Launch of GARD PortugalLaunch of GARD PortugalOctober 2007 First GARD SymposiumFirst GARD Symposium First GARD Portugal General AssemblyFirst GARD Portugal General Assembly December 2007 Meetings: Jean Bousquet with High Meetings: Jean Bousquet with High Commissariat of Health and General Commissariat of Health and General Director of HealthDirector of Health January 2008 GARD MeetingGARD MeetingJune 2008 GARD Portugal Launch GARD Portugal Questionnaire (16 Active Members) Types of Projects carried out by Active Members 38 23 11 7 6 85 R es ea rc h Pr om ot io n Sc re en in g Tr ai nn in g O th er ty pe s To ta l April – Month of the Lung (Lisbon District) Organization: 12 GARD members involved Objective: information about CRD to the population in public areas (schools, museum, shopping centers…) Activities: painting exhibitions, lectures, application of questionnaires. Spirometry and skin prick tests demonstrations Results: 1899 adults – men 42,8% Allergic population – 36,3% Rhinitis – 25,7% Asthma – 13,8% COPD – 7,3% Smokers – 22,8% Ex-Smokers – 18,3% Non-Smokers-58,7% Daily medication – 50,2% FEV1 ≤ 70% - 9,4% GARD Portugal – International Cooperation GARD Cabo Verde Epidemiological Study GARD survey - Prevalence of CRD at primary health care in Cabo Verde 2 papers on preparation: “Lung function and under diagnosis of respiratory diseases in Cabo Verde” and “Risk factors of respiratory diseases in Cabo Verde” Collaboration between GARD International, GARD Portugal and GARD Cabo, and Ministries of Health of the two countries Future collaboration with Angola, Brazil and other Portuguese speaking countries GARD Portugal
Language:English
Score: 1248651.4 - https://www.who.int/gard/news_...ts/7_rosado_pinto_portugal.pdf
Data Source: un
LETTER DATED 84/09/19 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF IRAN TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
Damages : 5 houses and 2 shops damaged and 2 fire incidents broke out. (...) lestruction of 4 shops and several fire incidents. 1984, Abadan was attacked by heavy artillery. ? (...) Vomiting, vertigo, and skin swelling observed in some people,and 2 injured civilians were hospitalized.
Language:English
Score: 1237746.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...nsf/get?open&DS=S/16751&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
TIPOS DE FACTOR HCL table english_en DOMESTIC WORK: POTENTIAL RISKS FOR CHILDREN TYPES OF RISK FACTOR DESCRIPTION OF HAZARD/REQUIREMENT/OR ACTIVITY POTENTIAL ADVERSE EFFECT ON HEALTH PREVENTIVE OR CORRECTIVE MEASURES PHYSICAL HAZARDS - Vibrations - Noise - Non-ionizing radiation (microwave) - Heat / Humidity - Lighting - Fire - Electricity While performing the following tasks: - Laundry - Food preparation - Gardening work - General household cleaning - Outward and inward trips for shopping - Night work - Hearing loss - Burns - Contact dermatitis - Dehydration - Tiredness - Skin lesions - Loss of sight - Cataracts - Death - Physical fatigue - Heat stress - Heat exhaustion - Electrical shocks - Children must be excluded from such work. - Programmes and action plans must be in place and measures must be adopted to prevent and eliminate child labour. - Capacitate and train adolescent girls and boys about the risks of the job. - Provide information about the risks of child domestic labour to parents and employers. - Encourage skin protection in adolescent girls and boys. CHEMICAL HAZARDS - Disinfectants - Detergents - Soaps - Dyes for clothing and hair - Bleaches (chlorine) - Kerosene - LPG (liquid petroleum gas) - Diesel, oils - Wax for floors and vehicles - Solvents - Paints - Bitumen - Agricultural chemicals (organochlorine, organophosphate) - Insecticides, herbicides and fungicides - Inappropriate collection and disposal of pesticide containers - Bleaching of hair and clothing - Nail varnish - Medicines - Alcohols - Cement - House paints - Lime - Exposure to chemicals during cleaning and laundry - Inhalation of toxic fumes when preparing cleaning mixtures - Exposure when cleaning pets - Inhalation of toxic fumes during the process of preparing mixtures and fumigating the house, garden or green areas - Skin absorption of agrochemicals in tasks involving the preparation of mixtures and fumigation of the house, garden or green areas - Ingestion of chemicals through food and/or beverages - Inappropriate working techniques and methods for handling, use, application, storage and disposal of chemical product residues - Acute and chronic poisoning - Death due to acute poisoning - Contact dermatitis - Reproductive/genetic disorders - Agrochemicals affecting the central and peripheral nervous system and the liver and kidneys - Asthma, alveolitis - Pulmonary fibrosis - Neurotoxicity - Irritation of respiratory tract and eyes - Optic nerve atrophy, cataracts - Cancers - Children and adolescent girls and boys must not prepare or apply chemicals. - Training should be given to adolescent girls and boys about the effect of chemicals on their health, to make them aware of the importance of not performing this task. - Replace the chemical used with one that is less toxic and more environmentally friendly, or alternative methods such as biological or organic control. - Store chemicals out of the reach of children and adolescents of both sexes. - Identify areas of chemical storage using signs. BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS - Viruses - Fungi - Bacteria - Parasites - Microorganisms in - Exposure to and handling of refuse and pet waste - Exposure to sick people - Exposure to sick animals - Exposure to and handling of - Contracting diseases preventable with vaccines (chicken pox, measles, polio, rubella, hepatitis A) - Children must be withdrawn from such work. - Do not expose adolescent girls and boys to bodily fluids, or to food - Exosure to and handling of live animals - Exposure to and handling of dead animal products and waste (skin, blood, guts, faeces) - Insects, worms, wasps, snakes, plants with allergenic effects or thorns waste and human secretions (faeces, urine, blood and saliva) - Exposure to bacteria due to cleaning of washrooms and pet enclosures - Exposure to reptiles (venomous snakes), wasps, ant and mosquito bites, among others. - Exposure to plants with allergenic effects - Exposure to bites or contact with material contaminated with rodent urine - Exposure to viruses and bacteria due to poor hygienic and sanitary conditions - Contracting common diseases (respiratory or gastrointestinal tract) - Contact dermatitis - Zoonoses (brucellosis, parasites) - Diseases communicable by insect bites - Amebiasis, bite injuries and wounds - Death by snakebite - Malaria - Inflammation and/or allergies due to insect or wasp stings, or to contact with plants - Skin infections due to stings - Tetanus - Leptospirosis - Parasitism human or animal waste. - Use vaccines against tetanus, hepatitis and leptospirosis - Make sure antivenoms are available. - Train adolescent workers of both sexes in biological risk prevention measures. - Use mosquito repellent creams. - Train adolescent girls and boys in good personal hygiene habits. - Children and adolescent girls and boys must not prepare or apply chemicals. - Training should be given to adolescent girls and boys about the effect of chemicals on their health, to make them aware of the importance of not performing this task. - Replace the chemical used with one that is less toxic and more environmentally friendly, or alternative methods such as biological or organic control. - Store chemicals out of the reach of children and adolescents of both sexes. - Identify areas of chemical storage using signs.
Language:English
Score: 1217464.5 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...s/presentation/wcms_617245.pdf
Data Source: un
Video games, such as Fortnite, are progenitors of the metaverse, and have long been engaged in selling virtual accoutrements, skins or “cosmetics” that players can use with their online avatars. So, this model may be instructive in the metaverse. Those skins do not expire. Players “own” them, provided, of course, they continue to participate with new iterations of Fortnite. (...) What will happen if the “walled gardens” of the current Internet disappear? Will these skins be something the purchaser owns and can use across the metaverse, as opposed to a specific platform?
Language:English
Score: 1200732.1 - https://www.wipo.int/wipo_maga...e/en/2022/01/article_0006.html
Data Source: un
PETITION FROM MR. FRANCOIS MANYENGUE CONCERNING THE CAMEROONS UNDER FRENCH ADMINISTRATION
\ 58-31671 / ••• T/PET .. 5/1354 English Page 2 My sufferings and losses: In spite of all this and while waiting for the bullets of the French colonialists in turn to pierce my skin and thus put an end to my natural rights and free life, as they have done to some of my com~atriots, I hereby submit to you a survey of the sufferings, imprisonment and losses to which I h~ve been subjected because I committed the crime of wishing for the sovereignty and the Immediate Independence and Unification of my Country, Kamerun. (...) On 20 April 1957, I was arrested, without any warrant, at my shop by Mr. Vergoz, the Chief Subdivisional Officer, and two police superintendents, all of them Europeans, with an African military escort. The value of the goods in the shop was over 350,000 francs (still local value).
Language:English
Score: 1189492.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...et?open&DS=T/PET.5/1354&Lang=E
Data Source: ods