Home

Results 41 - 50 of 294,411 for skin care. Search took 2.982 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
The so-called skin NTDs 1  manifest as changes in the skin (lumps or swelling, ulcers, swollen limbs and patches) and can easily be recognized by patients or family members. Awareness of the disease and the importance of early medical treatment is essential. Skin NTDs have definite characteristics. By training primary health care health workers, who are often the first point of contact with patients, these diseases can be recognized early and treated to prevent the complications and stigma associated with late detection - Dr Kingsley Asiedu, Head of WHO’s Global Buruli Ulcer Initiative An integrated approach to skin NTDs has many benefits as it provides a platform from which to screen populations in settings often characterized by fragile health systems. “ This approach will change the way we deal with these diseases, ” said Dr Alexandre Tiendrebeogo, Medical Officer for NTDs, WHO Regional Office for Africa. “ The detection of these diseases can be enhanced by actively involving community health workers, especially during household visits for mass medicine administration campaigns. ” 2 The approach also has the potential to improve the skills of primary health care workers and help with detection of diseases, mainly through school-based health programmes. It can also benefit the management of Buruli ulcer, leprosy, mycetoma, lymphoedema and hydrocele in patients suffering from lymphatic filariasis, through rehabilitation,  morbidity management and disability prevention . “ WHO has developed a simplified manual to help health care workers at the primary health care level to deal with multiple skin diseases, ” said Professor Roderick Hay, an international expert in dermatology who led  the publication . “ It is now available in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish and it is our hope that every primary health care facility will have a copy.“ Enhancing detection of skin NTDs through integration – the theme of the 2019 meeting – will take place on 25–27 March at WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.
Language:English
Score: 1471159 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...-tropical-diseases-of-the-skin
Data Source: un
Datasets include biological sample bank and image library of skin diseases for AI processing, m-health and smartcare applications in a cooperative network connecting hundreds of primary care units and low level secondary care hospitals across China. (...) There are about 21%-87% population in the world has skin problems in different area and skin diseases have become a major public health and social problem in our country. (...) Medical Big Data of Skin Diseases: We started building Medical Big Data of Skin Diseases from 2014 and our system has connected over 200 hospitals.
Language:English
Score: 1469461 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/f...ocuments/all/FGAI4H-A-012.docx
Data Source: un
Area Wealth Quintile Maternal Age Mother’s Education Caesarian Section by Various Characteristics Ethnicity of household head 70 <1 28 <1 Total 74 <1 25 <1 Urban 64 <1 35 <1 Rural Maternity home Hospital/ Clinic/ Health centre Other health facility Home Caesarian Section Percent distribution of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years delivered by C-section by timing of decision made for C-section Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years whose most recent live-born child was placed on the mother’s bare chest after birth Skin-to-skin Contact for Newborns Percent distribution of duration of skin-to-skin care among women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years whose most recent live-born child was given skin- to-skin contact with mother Duration of Skin-to-skin Contact with Mother Initial Breastfeeding Percentage of most recent live-born children to women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last two years who were ever breastfed, breastfed within one hour of birth and within one day of birth. (...) For indicator definitions, see earlier charts Region C Section Skin to skin care Institutional Delivery Postnatal Care for Mother Postnatal Care for Newborn National 47 29 99 47 92 Tbilisi 43 36 100 40 94 Adjara A.R. 58 18 99 71 82 Guria 37 26 100 35 99 Imereti, Racha-Lechkhumi and Kvemo Svaneti 52 26 100 69 96 Kakheti 44 30 98 57 91 Mtkheta-Mtianeti 34 35 97 35 90 Samegrelo-Zemo Svaneti 63 14 100 44 90 Samtskhe-Javakheti 36 14 100 23 72 Kvemo Kartli 45 39 100 40 91 Shida Kartli 44 24 96 33 98 Key Messages • The vast majority of births were delivered in health care facilities (99%) and only 1% of the births were delivered elsewhere. • Among the births that took place in a medical facility, 47% were delivered by cesarean section, ranging from a high of 63% in the region of Samegrelo-Zemo Svaneti to 34-36% in Mtskheta-Mtianeti and Samtskhe-Javakheti. • The probability of delivering by caesarean section increases with the maternal age and educational attainment. (...) There is no evident difference between rural & urban settings. • Almost 80% of cases were planned (elective) C-sections - decided before onset of labour pains. • Only 29% of live-born children in the last 2 years were given skin-to-skin contact with mother and out of 29% only 5% of children were given skin-to-skin contact for 2 hours and more (WHO recommendation). • Only 43% of children born in the last 2 years with vaginal childbirth was given skin-to-skin contact.
Language:English
Score: 1469352.2 - https://www.unicef.org/georgia...maternal_newborn_health_en.pdf
Data Source: un
UNICEF/Kljajo Solution Skin-to-skin contact helps regulate the baby’s heartbeat and breathing, maintains optimal body temperature, induces longer and more peaceful sleep, acts as strong motivation for breastfeeding, and may help with the baby’s weight gain. All this helps speed up recovery and facilitates the shorter stay of premature babies in hospital. Breastfeeding and skin-to-skin contact may literally save the life of premature girls and boys. In order to make sure that premature and seriously ill children in intensive neonatology units receive an opportunity to experience skin-to-skin contact with their parents and that they are fed human milk, UNICEF had to procure equipment for all 13 units of intensive neonatology care and organise training for health workers.
Language:English
Score: 1468311.3 - https://www.unicef.org/croatia/en/premature-babies
Data Source: un
Select language Select language English Western Pacific Home Health topics All health topics » A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Popular topics >> COVID-19 Ageing Vaccines Universal Health Coverage Mental health Tobacco Antimicrobial resistance Climate change Featured topic >> Primary health care WHO/Yoshi Shimizu © Credits Our work Universal health coverage >> Healthy environments and populations >> Health security and emergencies >> Disease elimination and control >> Year of the Nurse and Midwife >> Resources >> Publications Library Data Regional data>> Regional COVID-19 dashboard Newsroom All news >> News releases Feature stories Commentaries Speeches Events Headlines >> Multimedia >> Photos Videos Infographics Featured story >> Emergencies Outbreaks and emergencies >> Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Polio in Malaysia Polio outbreak in the Philippines Surveillance >> Influenza Avian influenza Dengue Emergency advice >> Pacific islands surveillance >> COVID-19 in the Region >> Getty images © Credits About us Overview >> How we work Where we work Programmes Country support Pacific Technical Support Governance >> Regional Director Regional Committee Working for Better Health in the Western Pacific >> Partnerships >> Collaborating Centers Donors Regional health initiatives Careers >> Contact us >> RCM 2022 >> Home / News / item / Progress on Early Essential Newborn Care in the Western Pacific Region, but millions of newborn infants remain at risk Progress on Early Essential Newborn Care in the Western Pacific Region, but millions of newborn infants remain at risk 17 August 2017 News release Da Nang, Viet Nam Preterm babies benefit from Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) through prolonged and continuous skin-to-skin contact. (...) Not only do separated babies not benefit from skin-to-skin contact, they are exposed to hypothermia and hospital-acquired infections. (...) First Embrace keeps babies calm, stimulates breathing and prevents hypothermia, reduces anaemia, prevents brain haemorrhage, strengthens immunity from infections, and provides adequate and appropriate nutrition from breastfeeding. Kangaroo mother care (KMC), is where preterm and low birth weight babies are maintained in skin-to-skin contact, fed breastmilk and monitored closely for infection.
Language:English
Score: 1466686.7 - https://www.who.int/westernpac...newborn-infants-remain-at-risk
Data Source: un
They cause immense discomfort, suffering, stigmatization and mental distress and affect the quality of life of mostly marginalized populations in remote rural areas. “ This framework is designed to support endemic countries in establishing a strong health-care system to deliver holistic services not only for skin NTDs but also for other skin diseases,” said Dr Rie Yotsu, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, the co-author of the framework and a webinar panellist. (...) Country experiences During the webinar, panellists shared country experiences and challenges in implementing skin NTD programmes. In the Brazilian Amazon , a multidisciplinary team provides comprehensive care to patients with dermatological diseases, especially for skin NTDs. (...) Dr Gautam Biswas, Director a.i., WHO/NTD, concluded by urging countries and partners to use the framework within the primary health care system and direct resources to addressing the huge unmet needs of skin NTDs.
Language:English
Score: 1465023.6 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...e-unmet-needs-of-skin-diseases
Data Source: un
They include: dignified and respectful care during childbirth; immediate and thorough drying of newborn; immediate skin-to-skin contact of mother and newborn; appropriately timed clamping and cutting of the umbilical cord; exclusive breastfeeding; Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC); and recognizing and treating infections. (...) Since EENC was introduced, as much as 72% of newborn babies in the 2258 participating health facilities across the Region are now placed in immediate skin-to-skin contact. Close to 50% remain in skin-to-skin contact until completion of the first breastfeeding. (...) Some babies are not put in skin-to-skin contact at all. Very few preterm newborns receive Kangaroo Mother Care, a practice known to save lives.
Language:English
Score: 1462913.3 - https://www.who.int/westernpac...es-for-a-healthy-start-to-life
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Photo essay Skin-to-skin contact boosts the growth of Morish, a tiny baby born early Kangaroo Mother Care supporting growth of preterm babies By Proscovia Nakibuuka Mbonye UNICEF Uganda/2019/Abdul 11 January 2020 The 15 November 2019 started just like any other day for 28-year-old Lucy Ayikoru – house chores and then a visit to the market. (...) KMC is a method of care of preterm babies, involving infants being carried, usually by the mother, with skin-to-skin contact. (...) UNICEF Uganda/2019/Abdul Benefits of the skin-to-skin contact of mother and baby Sister Ndaru explains the benefits of skin-to-skin contact for mother and baby with a lot of passion.
Language:English
Score: 1461345.3 - https://www.unicef.org/uganda/...th-morish-tiny-baby-born-early
Data Source: un
The guidelines emphasize skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth and support for the initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour after birth. (...) The guideline contains a specific set of the standardized conditions and practices of health workers for maternal and new born care, which promotes early initiation of breastfeeding after delivery and ensure skin to skin contact in all obstetrical and pediatric specialized hospital and departments. - The hospital quality assessment criteria contain Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative’s Ten Standard Steps for Encouragement, Protection and Support Breastfeeding Practices within health service system. (...) Initial progress made and the way forward - According to the Second Biennial Progress Report of Western Pacific Region on Early Essential Newborn Care 2016-2017, more than 80% of term babies received immediate skin to skin contact, and 73 per cent of babies received early initiation of breast feeding within one hour of birth in Viet Nam.
Language:English
Score: 1459505.9 - https://www.unicef.org/vietnam/media/5671/file
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Article Skin-to-skin contact has been a gift of life for little Nellys Her mother says that the Kangaroo Mother Program and the Care for Child Development activities have guided her on what to do to help her little girl develop. (...) Cleotilde Matos, a perinatologist pediatrician at the de Los Mina Maternal and Child Hospital, explains that Kangaroo Mother is a care strategy for premature children that revolves around skin-to-skin contact, breastfeeding, and the bond between the mother and the baby. Babies born prematurely regulate their temperature and heart rate by remaining in skin-to-skin contact with their mothers. The Care for Child Development (CCD) approach provides parents with strategies to stimulate them by providing nurturing and respectful care from birth, which complements the Kangaroo Mom Program.
Language:English
Score: 1448766.6 - https://www.unicef.org/lac/en/...s-been-gift-life-little-nellys
Data Source: un