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Dominic, a 4-year-old boy from a village of Bacau, is one of them. His skin turns red, dries and falls off every day. The boy’s survival depends on a daily care ritual. (...) The second part of the caring ritual involves putting on hydrating lotions.  (...) One hour later though, his skin started to dry up and became even redder. That is why he was taken to intensive care.
Language:English
Score: 1443200.4 - https://www.unicef.org/romania/stories/dominics-superpower
Data Source: un
According to WHO, the risk is greatest in the poorest countries where the greatest number of preterm births and infant deaths occur, and disruptions to kangaroo mother care – early, prolonged skin-to-skin contact with a parent, and exclusive breastfeeding – will worsen these risks.  “Decades of progress in reducing child deaths will be jeopardized unless we act now to protect and improve quality care services for mothers and newborns, and expand coverage of lifesaving interventions like kangaroo mother care”, Dr. (...) The new research, by WHO and partners, was published in the Lancet EclinicalMedicine.   Kangaroo mother care  WHO said that up to 125,000 babies’ lives could be saved with full coverage of kangaroo mother care.
Language:English
Score: 1443109 - https://news.un.org/story/2021/03/1087442
Data Source: un
The medical staff at the health centre spared no time to put the babies directly on the body of their mother, skin-to-skin, like kangaroos carry their babies close to the breast, in the Kangaroo Mother Care position. The midwife explained to Dhalu the benefits of the Kangaroo Mother Care technique, and she felt at ease. Dhalu, 20, holds her daughter close to her chest for skin-to-skin contact. (...) The centre provides curative care, immunization, management of childhood illness services, maternal and newborn care, sexual and reproductive healthcare, ante- and post-natal care as well as family planning services, screening and referral of gender-based violence cases.
Language:English
Score: 1442766.6 - https://www.unicef.org/rosa/st...ingya-refugee-camps-bangladesh
Data Source: un
TG-Derma: Dermatology AI for global health (DAIGH) proposal for image recognition challenge for skin diseases – Att.1: Presentation FGAI4H-K-033-A01 E-meeting, 27-29 January 2021 Source: Dermatology AI for Global Health, USA Title: TG-Derma: Dermatology AI for global health (DAIGH) proposal for image recognition challenge for skin diseases – Att.1: Presentation Purpose: Discussion Contact: Lincoln Manzi E-mail: dermatology.global.health@gmail.com Abstract: This PPT summarizes the content of K-033 for presentation and discussion during the meeting. 1 Executive Summary 2     Skin disease is a significant, and often under-appreciated, health care issue in the developing world One component of an approach to better address skin disease burden in the developing world could be to use smartphones as diagnostic tools We have assembled a dataset and built a proof-of-concept Deep Learning diagnostic system for several skin conditions prevalent in the developing world Multi-participant challenges (e.g., ImageNet) have demonstrated the ability to produce rapid, dramatic improvements in image classification performance We are seeking institutional partners to organize an initial skin disease image classification challenge focused on conditions prevalent in the developing world This can be the starting point for the broader vision of developing and distributing free software to enable smartphones to support diagnosis of a wide range of health conditions in the developing world 2 The Burden of Skin Disease in the Developing World 3 Skin disease is a significant, and often under-appreciated, health care issue in the developing world     Skin disease is the 4th leading cause of nonfatal disease burden worldwide Skin diseases represent approximately 2% of global burden of disease measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) Different skin conditions (e.g., melanoma and acne vulgaris) are leading contributors to burden of disease in wealthy countries versus those skin conditions (e.g., dermatitis and cellulitis) that are the largest contributors to disease burden in developing countries There is a sparsity of physicians with dermatological training in many low and middle-income countries Sources: Global Skin Disease Morbidity and Mortality, Karimkhani, et al (2017); Global Burden of Skin Disease: Inequities and Innovations, Seth, et al (2017) 3 Concept of Smartphone Skin Diagnosis 4 One component of an approach to better address skin disease burden in the developing world is to use smartphone photos to help diagnose conditions and/or motivate remote clinician evaluation     Sources: Augmented Intelligence Dermatology, Han, et al (2020). Image Credits: SkinVision; Model Dermatology 4 Smartphone Availability in Emerging Economies 5 Smartphones are widely and increasingly distributed in emerging economies     Sources: Pew Research Center Spring 2018 Global Attitudes Survey; Newzoo Global Mobile Market Report (2018 and 2019); DAIGH estimates More than 700 million smartphone users in just these example countries in 2018 Smartphone user count grew an estimated 20% between 2018 and 2019 in these countries, resulting in an estimated 840 million users in these 9 countries in 2019 Conservatively, there are more than 1 billion smartphone users across all emerging economies in 2021 5 Results to Date 6 We have assembled a dataset and built proof-of-concept Deep Learning diagnostic system     Sourced ~20K of affected areas of skin with a wide variety of ethnicities and skin tones. Each image is annotated with one of 23 disease classifications by dermatologists Constructed and tested numerous Deep Learning architectures to predict disease based only on images Several commercial systems address a similar challenege(e.g., UMSkinCheck, MoleMapper, Miiskin, MoleScope and SkinVision ), but are focused on developed world conditions, especially melanoma We focused on four conditions prevalent in the developing world: Scabies, ringworm, acne, and eczema Best architecture achieved 80% accuracy on a held-out test set of images US Patent 63/034564: "Image-Based Skin Disease Identification" (Pending) 6 ImageNet Challenge: Deep Learning Model Performance Over Time 7 The annual ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge demonstrated that multi-participant challenges can produce rapid, dramatic improvements in image classification performance     Human Benchmark Source: The History Began from AlexNet: A Comprehensive Survey of Deep Learning Approaches, Alom, et al (2018) 7 Skin Disease Classification Challenge 8 We are seeking institutional partners to organize an initial skin disease image classification challenge focused on skin conditions prevalent in the developing world     We can make available an open-sourced training dataset of ~18K annotated images with a stratified randomized hold-out test set of ~2K images that are available for non-commercial use with attribution We can also make available the base architectures, code and results developed in support of our proof-of-concept This can be the starting point for the broader vision of developing and distributing free software to convert the computational power and sophisticated sensors (camera, microphone, gyroscope, GPS, etc.) embedded in smartphones to support diagnosis of a wide range of health conditions in the developing world from heart disease to mental health 8 Thank You!
Language:English
Score: 1442400.7 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/f...ents/all/FGAI4H-K-033-A01.pptx
Data Source: un
According to WHO, the risk is greatest in the poorest countries where the greatest number of preterm births and infant deaths occur, and disruptions to kangaroo mother care – early, prolonged skin-to-skin contact with a parent, and exclusive breastfeeding – will worsen these risks.  “Decades of progress in reducing child deaths will be jeopardized unless we act now to protect and improve quality care services for mothers and newborns, and expand coverage of lifesaving interventions like kangaroo mother care”, Dr. (...) The new research, by WHO and partners, was published in the Lancet EclinicalMedicine.   Kangaroo mother care  WHO said that up to 125,000 babies’ lives could be saved with full coverage of kangaroo mother care.
Language:English
Score: 1438959.6 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2021/03/1087442
Data Source: un
It is very unfortunate that in Tanzania, due to serious lack of knowledge as to  why  their  “white  skinned”  off  springs  came  about,  African mothers  and  fathers  became more and more fearful and suspicious and began to separate (in some tribes  they are killed  immediately after birth) “white skinned” off springs away  from  the  “black skinned” population.     (...) I was surprised why  my skin was white while my brothers and sisters were black.  (...) Now as a Member of Parliament  I am proud of my President  Jakaya Mrisho  Kikwete who  appointed me. He  didn’t  care  about my  colour,  he  cared  about my  ability. 
Language:English
Score: 1437395.3 - https://www.un.org/en/durbanre...pdf/Al%20Shaymaa%20Kwegyir.pdf
Data Source: un
Panel one: Addressing gaps Roderick Hay, Advisor, International Foundation for Dermatology, UK said that almost 1 billion people have skin conditions caused mainly by six or seven common skin diseases. Skin NTDs present visible skin alterations, and because many of them occur in the same settings and have similar manifestations, joint approaches and resources can be used to detect and resolve the problems they create. (...) She said that inclusion is critical to tackling skin NTDs through dermatological care and acknowledged the support of a relatively new organization, GLODERM, in helping to advance NTD dermatology.
Language:English
Score: 1436229.7 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...cial-impact-and-stigmatization
Data Source: un
The medical staff at the health centre spared no time to put the babies directly on the body of their mother, skin-to-skin, like kangaroos carry their babies close to the breast, in the Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) position. (...) Dhalu, 20, holds her daughter close to her chest for skin-to-skin contact. The skin-to-skin contact keeps the baby warm, also stabilizes the baby’s heartbeat and breathing, increases the bonding of the baby with the mother and supports the healthy development of the brain. (...) The centre provides curative care, immunization, management of childhood illness services, maternal and newborn care, sexual and reproductive healthcare, ante- and post-natal care as well as family planning services, screening and referral of GBV cases.
Language:English
Score: 1434362.7 - https://www.unicef.org/banglad...ingya-refugee-camps-bangladesh
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Article First Kangeroo Mother Care unit opens in The Gambia Skin-to-skin care for preterm/low birth weight babies UNICEF Gambia UNICEF Gambia 15 October 2017 The first Gambian Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) unit was opened at Edward Francis Small Teaching Hospital on 11th October 2017, for the management of preterm/low birth weight babies. KMC, or skin-to-skin care, consists of keeping the nearly naked baby upright and in contact with the mother’s chest for as-long-as possible, aiming for 18 to 20 hours per day. (...) Twenty-five (25) Gambian health care workers were trained in theory and practices of KMC.
Language:English
Score: 1432982.4 - https://www.unicef.org/wca/sto...-mother-care-unit-opens-gambia
Data Source: un
These babies need special care for warmth and feeding. Those weighing more than 2000 gm, with no complications usually survive with breast feeding, proper home care, and hygiene. KMC is evidence-based and involves skin-to-skin care, provided by mothers to premature babies with no complications, and weighing less than 2000 gm. (...) KMC rooms facilitate their stay and provides them ample space with their babies where they provided intermittent skin to skin contact, and  fed them breast milk until the babies passed the critical period without any complications and gained satisfactory weight to thrive.
Language:English
Score: 1432353.4 - https://www.unicef.org/iraq/stories/babies-born-too-soon
Data Source: un