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South-East Asia Thailand Home Health topics News Our work About us Activities Emergencies Home / News / Detail / The new version of the WHO Skin NTDs app is now available The new version of the WHO Skin NTDs app is now available 12 December 2021 News release We are pleased to inform you that the new version of the WHO Skin NTDs app is now  available for Android . Like the  version in iOS  published last month, the content is available in 4 languages: English, French, Portuguese and Spanish. The skin of a patient is the first and most visible structure of the body that any health-care worker encounters during the course of an examination. (...) This app explains how to identify the signs and symptoms of neglected tropical diseases of the skin through their visible characteristics. It also contains information on how to diagnose common skin problems that front-line health workers may encounter.  
Language:English
Score: 1420215.6 - https://www.who.int/thailand/n...skin-ntds-app-is-now-available
Data Source: un
Access to quality maternal health care and abuses of women’s rights during childbirth Since 2010 Croatia has moved towards centralizing birth and postpartum care in 30 maternity hospitals throughout the country. (...) CEDAW/C/HRV/CO/4-5 21 See Intrapartum Care: Care of healthy women and their babies during childbirth. (...) Access to infants immediately after birth In many hospitals, there have been problems with facilitating immediate skin to skin contact with mothers and their infants immediately after birth; skin to skin contact has proven benefits for the mother’s immediate postpartum health by decreasing bleeding and encouraging the birth of the placenta, but also has proven benefits for the health and wellbeing of infants.3334 Skin to skin care is especially restricted for mothers who are giving birth by caesarean section, who are often separated from their children for a number of hours, and for mothers whose infants need care in the neo-natal intensive care unit (NICU).35 Recommendations  Ensure that all mothers have unrestricted access to their infants immediately after giving birth, and have the opportunity to have skin to skin contact with healthy, term infants whether they are born vaginally or by caesarean section.  Ensure that all mothers whose children are born prematurely or are sick and require NICU care have access to their infants and can practice skin to skin (kangaroo) care. 4.
Language:English
Score: 1415461.2 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de.../FollowUp2018/Roda_Croatia.pdf
Data Source: un
To mitigate these risks, UNICEF supports the early care of premature infants, and their families, through skin-to-skin contact from the moment of birth and according to the degree of prematurity or affectation, such practice is known as Kangaroo Mother Care Method. (...) UNICEF/2022/Prieto Gladiuska has skin-to-skin contact with her one-month-old daughter, Reimarys, while she waits to be seen at the kangaroo mother clinic, a service supported by UNICEF. (...) The service called “kangaroo mother care method” consults care for premature infants.
Language:English
Score: 1414265.3 - https://www.unicef.org/venezue...orn-prematurely-or-underweight
Data Source: un
The cows had been infected by an outbreak of lumpy skin disease, an infectious cattle disease characterized by the appearance of skin nodules. (...) “People say that had I not taken care of my cow the way I had, she would have most definitely died from the disease. The kind of diarrhoea, temperature, and loss of appetite that she suffered made me think she would not make it, but I did not give up on her and took care of her around the clock.”     Shukla with the cow that recovered from lumpy skin disease, Mirsharai, Chattagram.
Language:English
Score: 1411429.3 - https://www.fao.org/emergencie...in-disease-in-target-areas-/en
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Article Kangaroo Mother Care helps the physical and mental health of preterm babies Overcoming physical and mental health of preterm babies UNICEF Iran UNICEF Iran/2017/Andisheh Rad Available in: فارسي، فارسي English 07 February 2018 Azadeh Darouzmi is sitting on a chair in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Mahdiyeh Hospital in Tehran, dressed in a sanitary dress and holding Aisu close to provide skin-to-skin contact. This is part of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) provided to babies in the NICU of this hospital where quality medical care for preterm babies is available. (...) My husband also comes once a day to give our daughters skin-to-skin contact as the nurses recommended,” Azadeh said.
Language:English
Score: 1410668.9 - https://www.unicef.org/iran/en...d-mental-health-preterm-babies
Data Source: un
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Language:English
Score: 1410631.6 - https://www.who.int/publicatio...-detail-redirect/9789241548915
Data Source: un
When Thiago was born, they didn't show him to her and took him to the intensive care unit because he was "losing his breath," as they told her. (...) I felt that when I laid him on my skin he breathed perfectly, and when I took him out because I had to do something, he would turn pale, so I would put him close to me right away, skin to skin, at once”. (...) Related topics Breastfeeding Motherhood Dominican Republic More to explore Article Care for Child Development Case Studies Cuidado para el Desarrollo Infantil Read the story News note 02 March 2022 More than half of parents and pregnant women exposed to aggressive formula milk marketing – WHO, UNICEF Read now Article Skin-to-skin contact has been a gift of life for Nellys Skin-to-skin contact has been a gift of life for little Nellys Read the story Article Cordelia's wish: seeing her little Angel grow Cordelia's wish: seeing her little Angel grow Read the story Footer What we do News and stories Publications Take action About UNICEF Children in Latin America and the Caribbean Where we work Work for UNICEF Press centre Support UNICEF Become a donor Social (En) Footer Secondary - En Contact us Legal Footer tertiary - EN Report fraud, abuse, wrongdoing
Language:English
Score: 1410005.7 - https://www.unicef.org/lac/en/...spitals-today-he-healthy-child
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Report Program Kangaroo Mom Find out what the care of premature infants consists of by keeping them in skin-to-skin contact with their parents. UNICEF Available in: Español English Highlights The kangaroo mother method consists of caring for premature children by keeping them in skin-to-skin contact with their parents or any member of the family, which strengthens the emotional ties between the baby and his family group.
Language:English
Score: 1409984.3 - https://www.unicef.org/venezue...n/reports/program-kangaroo-mom
Data Source: un
Based on 2017 DPR Korea MICS Selected MICS Indicators Total Province DPRK Ryanggang Demography Total population (thousands) 24.056 742 Rural population (%) 39 35 Children under five (%) 7,0 7,0 Total Fertility Rate 1,9 1,9 Possessions and ICT Population in Wealth Index Group 1 (%) 20 63 Households with a Mobile phone (%) 69 60 Exposure to mass media (%) 80 76 ICT skills, female (%) 30 21 ICT skills, male (%) 41 33 Households with a refrigerator (%) 30 20 Health Diarrhoea prevalence 11 11 Antenatal Care coverage at least four times 94 94 Full content of antenatal care 88 97 Neonatal tetanus protection 84 59 Home delivery 8 7 Skilled attendant at delivery by (assistant) doctor 90 99 Post-natal health check for the newborn 98 100 Skin-to-skin-care 27 31 Nutrition Iodized Salt consumption 37,5 26 Wasting prevalence 2,5 4,4 Stunting prevalence 19,0 32 Minimum dietary diversity 47 49 Minimum acceptable diet 29 26 Early initiation of breastfeeding 43 31 Water and sanitation Use of basic drinking water 93 94 Piped water into dwelling 58 49 Faecal contamination of source water 24 26 Use of safely managed drinking water 61 58 Use of improved sanitation facilities 84 85 Piped sewer system 47 24 Correctly managed sanitation 48 29 Basic drinking water AND sanitation service 78 81 Protection Inadequate supervision 16 11 Violent discipline 59 78 Attitudes towards physical punishment 21 39 Child labour 5 4 Attitudes towards domestic violence 10 18 Early Development Availability of children's books 50 35 Early child development index 88 95 Attendance to early childhood education 73 65 Education Female higher education attainment 20 13 Male higher education attainment 37 31 Upper Secondary Net attendance ratio 95 96 Report card received 93 98 Children with foundational reading skills 95 99 Children with foundational numeracy skills 82 88 The 26 indicators used for the performance classification overview of the province are bold in the above list. (...) Central Bureau of Statistics Ryanggang province profile Generating evidence to deliver for children Nutrition status of children under-5 Learning skills Infant and young child feeding Children in inadequate care and children victim of violent discipline Health: key obstetric indicators Possessions and communication Population using safely managed water and correctly managed sanitation 2,5 19 4,4 32 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Wasting Stunting DPKR Ryanggang 95 82 88 99 88 95 0 20 40 60 80 100 Foundational reading skills Foundational numerical skills Early child development index RyanggangTotal 29 43 26 31 0 10 20 30 40 50 Minimum acceptable diet Early initiation of breastfeeding RyanggangTotal 16 59 11 78 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Inadequate care Violent discipline method Total Ryanggang 88 90 27 97 99 31 0 20 40 60 80 100 Full content of antenatal care Skilled birth attendance by doctor/ assistant Skin-to-skin contact RyanggangTotal 20 80 69 63 76 60 0 20 40 60 80 100 Population in wealth index group 1 Exposure to mass media Mobile phone possession RyanggangTotal 48 61 29 58 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Correctly managed sanitation Safely managed water Total Ryanggang Performance classification overview Province classified red (out of 26) 12 Province classified green (out of 26) 6 Overall classification The tertile method is used to clas- sify the provinces.
Language:English
Score: 1407729.1 - https://www.unicef.org/dprk/si...iles/2019-11/3.1-Ryanggang.pdf
Data Source: un
How should someone take care of themselves if they have monkeypox? What care do they need? (...) People with monkeypox should avoid scratching their skin and take care of their rash by cleaning their hands before and after touching sores and keeping skin dry and uncovered (unless they are unavoidably in a room with someone else, in which case they should cover it with clothing or a bandage until they are able to isolate again). (...) If you have symptoms that could be monkeypox, it is important that you contact a healthcare provider for advice, testing and care, even if they are busy. Because monkeypox spreads through close contact, take care to avoid exposing health workers to the virus – call ahead before your visit to warn them that you suspect your symptoms could be due to monkeypox, wear a mask and cover your skin with clothing when seeking care.  
Language:English
Score: 1407048.9 - https://www.who.int/news-room/...ns-and-answers/item/monkeypox/
Data Source: un