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PowerPoint Presentation © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 Social Protection Spending in Lebanon A deep dive into State Financing of Social Protection Budget Review Policy Brief In partnership with: © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 2 Social Protection Spending Please cite this publication as: Institut http://institutdesfinances.gov.lb/publication/social- protection-spending-in-lebanon-a-dive-into-the-state-financing-of-social-protection/ ISBN 978-9953-9037-0-5 This brief was prepared in collaboration with Financially Wise and published in partnership with UNICEF and the International Labor Organization Enhancing Budget Transparency, Accountability and Inclusiveness in Lebanon http://institutdesfinances.gov.lb/publication/social-protection-spending-in-lebanon-a-dive-into-the-state-financing-of-social-protection/ © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 I- Background & Methodology Context Lebanon s free fall into poverty Context Fiscal Outlook and exit scenario Purpose Drive evidence-based policy decisions Scope Analyzing the Government financing of social spending through its budget Methodology Data sources Methodology Definitions of social protection programs and services Methodology Assumptions Methodology Limitations Methodology Approach II Findings of the Budget Review Macro-fiscal analysis - Social Protection spending as per the Functional Classification of Budget Expanding the analysis beyond the functional classification Macro-fiscal analysis - Social Protection spending as per a wider definition Analysis of Social Protection spending by contingency Analysis of Social Protection spending by beneficiary group Public sector Private sector Poor and vulnerable groups All sectors Other 3 Table of content Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 By pillar - main findings of Social Protection spending Pillar 1 Employment related social protection including Social Insurance Pillar 2 Social Assistance Pillar 3 Financial Access to services Pillar 4 Social Welfare Pillar 5 Economic inclusion and labor activation Analysis of Social Protection spending by Implementing agency Analysis of Social Protection spending by Source of Financing III- Summary findings IV- Conclusions & Recommendations V- Appendixes 4 Table of content Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 5 Figure 1: Total budgeted expenses covering Social Protection (function 10) Figure 2: Function 10-Social protection as share of current GDP Figure 3: Public social protection expenditures, excluding health, selected regions (% of GDP) (2015) Figure 4: Share of social protection expenditure (in % of GDP) in selected countries (2018) Figure 5: Coverage of the poorest and richest quintiles by social safety nets, by country (in %) (World Bank, 2018) Figure 6: Poverty and extreme Poverty Rates for the Lebanese population, 2012-2020 (World Bank, 2020) Figure 7: Social protection coverage by decile, Lebanese citizens (ILO, 2021) Figure 8: Distribution of beneficiaries and benefits (Lebanese citizens only), by income decile (ILO, 2021) Figure 9: Share of informal sector in Lebanon (2009, 2010 2019, 2020) Figure 10: Functional classification distribution of main functions under social protection Figure 11: Functional classification major secondary functions Figure 12: Proportion of Lebanese citizens receiving SP benefits, by selected individual characteristics (ILO, 2021) Figure 13: Social protection spending classified outside function 10 Figure 14: Evolution of budgeted SP expenses per functions (functions as share of total SP) Figure 15: Reclassification of social protection spending identified under and outside Function 10 into the five pillars Figure 16: Effective SP spending as share of current GDP Figure 17: Evolution of budgeted SP expenses as share of total budgeted expenses incl. annexed budgets* (thousands of LBP) List of Figures Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 6 Figure 18: Cumulative SP spending by social risk between 2017-2019 (thousands of LBP) - excluding NSSF budget Figure 19: SP spending on old ages (thousands of LBP) - including NSSF budget Figure 20: SP spending on old ages per beneficiary group Figure 21: SP spending on Wellbeing (thousands of LBP) Figure 22: SP spending on Wellbeing per beneficiary group Figure 23: SP spending on Medical care (thousands of LBP) Figure 24: SP spending on Medical care per beneficiary group Figure 25: Spending gap by beneficiary groups (thousands of LBP) 2017-2019) Figure 26: SP spending by beneficiary group (thousands of LBP) Figure 27: SP spending by beneficiary group all public sector groups (thousands of LBP) Figure 28: SP spending by beneficiary group Public sector civil servants and military personnel (thousands of LBP)) Figure 29: Evolution of spending on pensions and end of service indemnities (thousands of LBP) Figure 30: SP spending by beneficiary group military personnel (thousands of LBP) Figure 31: Other social benefits to security forces (thousands of LBP) Figure 32: SP spending by beneficiary group civil servants (thousands of LBP) Figure 33: Figure 34: Government contribution to other mutual funds (Effective spending - thousands of LBP) List of Figures Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 7 Figure 35: SP spending by beneficiary group private sector workers (thousands of LBP) Figure 36: Government contributions to other entities (Effective spending - thousands of LBP) Figure 37: SP spending by beneficiary group poor and vulnerable categories (thousands of LBP) Figure 38: SP spending by beneficiary group all sectors (thousands of LBP) Figure 39: SP spending by beneficiary group other (thousands of LBP) Figure 40: Evolution of main pillars by budgeted appropriations (thousands of LBP) Figure 41: Evolution of disaggregated pillars by effective appropriations (thousands of LBP) Figure 42: Spending gap by disaggregated pillars Social Insurance (thousands of LBP) Figure 43: Spending gap by disaggregated pillars Social Assistance (thousands of LBP) Figure 44: Spending gap by disaggregated pillars Financial Access to Services (thousands of LBP) Figure 45: Spending gap by disaggregated pillars Social Welfare (thousands of LBP) Figure 46: Spending gap by disaggregated pillars (thousands of LBP) Figure 47: SP breakdown by implementing agency Average share of 2017,2018,2019 Figure 48: Appropriation share by line ministries Average share of effective spending over 4 years Figure 49: Effective Social Protection spending by source of financing (percentage share) Figure 50: Evolution of SP total expenses in thousands of LBP Figure 51: Evolution of SP total expenses excluding Transfers to EDL (thousands of LBP) List of Figures Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 8 Table 1: GFSM 2001 Classification of Expense by Function of Government Table 2: Table 2: Social Protection n.e.c. breakdown by line-item, Lebanon, 2019 Table 3: Beneficiary group breakdown by programs sum of 2017, 2018, 2019 (thousands of LBP) Table 4: Spending on drugs by Government agency Table 5: Beneficiary group breakdown by programs excl. pensions sum of 2017, 2018, 2019 (thousands of LBP) Public Sector Table 6: Beneficiary group breakdown by programs sum of 2017, 2018, 2019 (thousands of LBP) Private Sector Table 7: Beneficiary group breakdown by programs sum of 2017, 2018, 2019 (thousands of LBP) Poor and vulnerable groups Table 8: Beneficiary group breakdown by programs sum of 2017, 2018, 2019 (thousands of LBP) All sectors Table 9: Beneficiary group breakdown by programs sum of 2017, 2018, 2019 (thousands of LBP) Other Table 10: Social welfare spending gap by implementing agency - 2019 - (thousands of LBP) Table 11: Economic inclusion and labor activation breakdown by program (thousands of LBP) Table 12: Contribution schemes - (thousands of LBP) Table 13: Beneficiary group breakdown by programs sum of 2017, 2018, 2019 (thousands of LBP) List of Tables Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 9 BDL Banque du Liban (Central Bank) BRD Beyond and Development Group EDL Electricité du Liban GFSM Government Finance Statistics Manual of the International Monetary Fund ILO International Labor Organization IMF International Monetary Fund LBP Lebanese Pound MoF Ministry of Finance MoPH Ministry of Public Health MOSA Ministry of Social Affairs NSSF National Social Security Fund SDC Social Development Center SP Social Protection UNHCR United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees UNICEF United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund WB World Bank List of acronyms Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 Acknowledgement 10 The policy brief was prepared by a team from the Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan composed of Sabine Hatem (Senior Economist), Iskandar Boustany (Consultant and Budget Specialist, President of Financially Wise) and Abdo Daou (Consultant and Budget Analyst), under the supervision of Lamia Moubayed Bissat (President). (...) It is The functional classification was used in the first part of the review to map spending on social protection in Lebanon. Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 22 Social Protection is a key function of Government spending and provides a straightforward estimation of social spending. (...) Social Protection Spending Figure 18: Cumulative SP spending by social risk between 2017-2019 (thousands of LBP) - excluding NSSF budget When social protection expenditures are analyzed across the lifecycle, the largest share of spending goes to Old Age and Survivors, followed by well-being* and medical care, with very few discrepancies between budgeted and planned amounts.
Language:English
Score: 1315560.3 - https://www.unicef.org/lebanon...view%20policy%20Brief%20EN.pdf
Data Source: un
While exports from Algeria to the US averaged around 300 thousand barrels per day in 2010, exports are now down below 100 thousand barrels per day (see figure) . (...) Oil exports make up over 90 per cent of total exports and the country requires a very high average oil price in order to cover domestic spending. The IMF’s most recent article IV consultation in February pointed to a price of $121 per barrel to balance the government budget which was higher than average owing to new increases in civil service wages and current transfers in 2012. The price to cover the budget is expected to fall to around $110 in 2013 as increases in wages are expected to slow in the 2013 budget and growth in spending on social programs will be sub- dued. While this will help to reduce the deficit for the current year, the country remains vulnerable to a drop in oil prices given that the current Brent oil price benchmark is already below the the price necessary to cover the budget . the start of the [1]Overall oil output was about 1.2 million barrels per day in 2012.
Language:English
Score: 1121400.4 - https://www.un.org/development...uploads/sites/45/wesp_wh19.pdf
Data Source: un
Declining Very low birth rate Low death rate Falling population 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 3 The Caribbean population by age (millions) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1950 1965 1980 1995 2010 2025 2040 2055 2070 2085 2100 0-14 15-59 60+ 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 4 Caribbean population by age and sex, selected years 1990-2060 (thousands) 450 350 250 150 50 50 150 250 350 450 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ Male 1990 Female 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 5 Caribbean population by age and sex, selected years 1990-2060 (thousands) 450 350 250 150 50 50 150 250 350 450 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ Male 2000 Female 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 6 Caribbean population by age and sex, selected years 1990-2060 (thousands) 450 350 250 150 50 50 150 250 350 450 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ Male 2010 Female 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 7 Caribbean population by age and sex, selected years 1990-2060 (thousands) 450 350 250 150 50 50 150 250 350 450 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ Male 2020 Female 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 8 Caribbean population by age and sex, selected years 1990-2060 (thousands) 450 350 250 150 50 50 150 250 350 450 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ Male 2030 Female 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 9 Caribbean population by age and sex, selected years 1990-2060 (thousands) 450 350 250 150 50 50 150 250 350 450 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ Male 2040 Female 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 10 Caribbean population by age and sex, selected years 1990-2060 (thousands) 450 350 250 150 50 50 150 250 350 450 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ Male 2050 Female 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 11 Caribbean population by age and sex, selected years 1990-2060 (thousands) 450 350 250 150 50 50 150 250 350 450 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ Male 2060 Female 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 12 The Caribbean population 2015 and 2035 (thousands) 500 400 300 200 100 0 100 200 300 400 500 0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 100+ Male Female 2015 2035 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 13 Child, Old Age And Total Dependency Rates For The Caribbean (Number of persons per hundred people aged 15-64 years) 0 20 40 60 80 100 1950 1970 1990 2010 2030 2050 2070 2090 0-14 65 and over Total 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 14 Old age dependency rates by region (65+/15-64) 0 10 20 30 40 50 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 Latin America North America The Caribbean Europe Africa 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 15 Old age dependency ratio by country, 2015, 2030 and 2045 (65+/(15-64)) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Belize Guyana Suri- name Antigua and Barbuda Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Grenada Baha- mas The Caribbean Saint Lucia Trinidad and Tobago Jamaica Aruba Barbados Curaçao Guade- loupe The United States Virgin Islands Marti- nique 2015 2030 2045 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 16 Older persons in the Caribbean by sex and age, 2000-2050 (Thousands) 0 200 400 600 800 1 000 1 200 1 400 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 A. (...) Females 60-69 70-79 80-89 90+ 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 17 Survival curves for the Caribbean population (both sexes), selected years, 1890-2100 (Survival probability by age) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 S u rv iv a l p ro b a b il it y Age 2100 (Life expectancy = 85) 2050 (Life expectancy = 78) 2015 (Life expectancy = 73) 2000 (Life expectancy = 70) 1950 (Life expectancy = 57) 1890 (Life expectancy = 38) 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 18 Deaths due to non-communicable diseases (NCD) and population aged 60 and over, around 2010 ATG ABW BHS BRB BLZ GRD GLP GUY JAM MTQ PRI LCA VCT SUR TTO VIR 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 D e a th s d u e t o N C D s Population aged 60 and over 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 19 Fiscal implications of ageing • Population ageing will lead to increased demand for public expenditure on pensions and health care • Spending on public health care services in Latin America is expected to rise by 3.4 percentage shares of GDP between 2005 and 2050 and in the EU-15 countries by 3.2. The corresponding increases in public expenditure on pensions were 1.5 (Latin America) and 2.3 (EU-15) percentage shares of GDP. • It is reasonable to assume that similar increases will be required in Caribbean countries. 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 20 Public health spending and GDP per capita, 2012 (spending as a percentage of GDP and GDP per capita in international dollars, PPP) ATG BHS BRB BLZ DMA GRD GUY JAM KNA LCA VCT SUR TTO OECD 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 5 000 10 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 35 000 40 000 P u b li c s p e n d in g o n h e a lt h GDP per capita 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 21 Out-of-pocket expenditure on health and GDP per capita, 2012 (out-of-pocket expenditure as a percentage of total health expenditure) ATG BHS BRB BLZ DMA GRD GUY JAM KNA LCA VCT SUR TTO OECD 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 0 5 000 10 000 15 000 20 000 25 000 30 000 35 000 40 000 O u t- o f- p o c k e t e x p e n d it u re GDP per capita 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 22 Persons over retirement age who receive a contributory social security pension (%) 80 74 69 51 50 48 47 46 40 34 31 22 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Guyana (2011) Barbados (2008) Bahamas (2012) Antigua and Barbuda (2002) Grenada (2011) Saint Kitts and Nevis (2010) Trinidad and Tobago (2010) Dominica (2011) Jamaica (2003) Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (2006) Belize (2011) Saint Lucia (2007/08) 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 23 Expenditure on contributory and non- contributory pensions (% of GDP) 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Bahamas (2012) Barbados (2008) Belize (2011) Dominica (2011) Grenada (2011) Guyana (2011) Saint Kitts and Nevis (2010) Saint Lucia (2007/08) Trinidad and Tobago (2010) Contributory Non-contributory 6/2/2017 ECLAC Subregional Headquarters for the Caribbean 24 Non-contributory pensions and national poverty and indigence lines, 2013 (current international dollars (ppp) per month) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Trinidad and Tobago Suri- name Barbados Baha- mas Guyana Antigua and Barbuda Saint Kitts and Nevis Belize Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Jamaica Domi- nica Grenada Saint Lucia National poverty and indigence lines (per adult equivalent male at 2013 prices; poverty lines > indigence lines) Thank you!
Language:English
Score: 1062324 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...francis_jones_presentation.pdf
Data Source: un
Sarada Pengeni is treasurer of Consumer’s Group. (15”) SARADA PENGENI: (Nepalese) F “Before we went to collect five to seven pitchers of water, and we would spend a lot of time. Since this project got implemented with the community initiative, women are the group that has benefited the most.” (12.5”) NARRATION In rural Nepal, it is women’s responsibility to manage the family water. With women spending less time fetching water, they are now free to do other things. (...) It has reached 800,000 rural Nepalese and it aims to reach hundreds of thousand more. (27”) This report was prepared by Alison Schafer for United Nations. (4”)
Language:English
Score: 1055336.3 - https://www.un.org/webcast/pdfs/unia1164.pdf
Data Source: un
Haiti: ‘Dire’ situation awaits thousands of migrants forced to return from Americas  | | UN News Skip to main content Welcome to the United Nations Toggle navigation Language: العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español Português Kiswahili Other Hindi हिंदी Global UN News Global perspective Human stories Search the United Nations Search Advanced Search Home Africa Americas Asia Pacific Middle East Europe UN Art and Gifts History Corner Topics Peace and Security Economic Development Humanitarian Aid Climate and Environment Human Rights UN Affairs Women Law and Crime Prevention Health Culture and Education SDGs Migrants and Refugees In depth Interviews Features Photo Stories News in Brief The Lid is On UN Gender Focus UN and Africa UN Podcasts Secretary-General Spokesperson All Statements Selected Speeches Press Encounters Official Travels Media UN Video UN Photo Meeting Coverage Media Accreditation Webtv Home Africa Americas Asia Pacific Middle East Europe UN Art and Gifts History Corner Topics Peace and Security Economic Development Humanitarian Aid Climate and Environment Human Rights UN Affairs Women Law and Crime Prevention Health Culture and Education SDGs Migrants and Refugees In depth Interviews Features Photo Stories News in Brief The Lid is On UN Gender Focus UN and Africa UN Podcasts Secretary-General Spokesperson All Statements Selected Speeches Press Encounters Official Travels Media UN Video UN Photo Meeting Coverage Media Accreditation Webtv   Subscribe Audio Hub Haiti: ‘Dire’ situation awaits thousands of migrants forced to return from Americas  30 September 2021 Interviews  Download Conditions on the ground are dire for the thousands of Haitian migrants being forced to return to their homeland from the Americas, many of them “empty handed”, and bewildered.  That’s according to Giuseppe Loprete, chief of the International Organization for Migration's ( IOM ) Mission in Haiti, who told UN News that around 5,500 people have been forcibly returned since 19 September, with thousands more expected in the days ahead.   Those being expelled from the US border area and flown home, often after spending years away, are returning to a land facing multiple crises, Mr. 
Language:English
Score: 1035496.5 - https://news.un.org/en/audio/2021/09/1101812
Data Source: un
The school year has been long and stressful for the two little girls as for other thousands of children who had to stop school and spend nearly three months or more at home, following the health emergency which has been effective in Madagascar since March 23. (...) "I was very scared at first because the announcement was so sudden that it turned a lot of things upside down," said Antsa, who had to cope with the change. She spends her spare time taking care of her henhouse or reading for entertainment. (...) "I have to succeed at all costs", explained Alexana, enrolled in public primary school. Thousands of students will take the CEPE exam on Tuesday, particularly those from the Regions of Atsimo Atsinanana, Haute Matsiatra, Amoron’i Mania, Vatovavy Fitovinany and Atsimo Andrefana.
Language:English
Score: 1035305.5 - https://www.unicef.org/madagas...id-19-between-hope-and-anxiety
Data Source: un
This Father’s Day, Sovannarem is sharing his own journey as a dad, and emphasizing the importance of the father’s role in ensuring children grow to their fullest potential. “These days, I spend most of my time with my newborn daughter”, Sovannarem. (...) This is true; the first thousand days of life are crucial to the development of a child’s brain. (...) Being a father, I need to spend time with my daughters helping to have proper emotional, intelligence and physical development.
Language:English
Score: 1028341.1 - https://www.unicef.org/cambodia/stories/unconditional-love
Data Source: un
And I am happy to announce that from February onwards, our mission or our contribution in Lebanon to the United Nations peacekeeping mission will be increased by 15 additional troops. We continue to spend financial resources on preventing or helping to prevent conflicts in the Midwest of Africa, and so far, we have helped 50 thousand Christians to be able to stay in their homes in the Middle-East, where unfortunately, their communities are being under persecution on some occasions. (...) And we are happy to announce that we host more than 10 thousand students on state government scholarships from different parts of the world, where conflicts cause many troubles and problems, and the proof of success of this program is that this year, we have 49 thousand candidates for these 10 thousand spots here in Hungary.
Language:English
Score: 1024447.4 - https://www.un.org/peacebuildi...ng/files/documents/hungary.pdf
Data Source: un
- 1/6 One sixth of his salaries and allowances for every year he spends with the United Nations in addition to [one sixth] of the end of service remuneration in case the same is granted a sabbatical leave (...) An end of service gratuity is (5.952.900 J.D.) five thousand nine hundred fifty two dinars and nine hundred fills. 2. (...) Hamdan’s salary for one sabbatical year (4[.]118.600 J.D) four thousand one hundred eighteen dinars and six hundred fills. 3.
Language:English
Score: 1017682.3 - www.un.org/en/internalj...at/judgments/2016-UNAT-665.pdf
Data Source: oaj
We were crying too,” she recalls. Hiba spends most of her time in the special facility created for mothers with babies in the UNICEF supported child-friendly space. (...) “The birth of my baby made life here more tolerable, because it preoccupies us. We spend most of our time devoted to my son — my first baby. But my heart is with my husband. We want to spend these beautiful times with our new baby together,” she says.
Language:English
Score: 1012159.2 - https://www.unicef.org/northma...-stranded-route-towards-europe
Data Source: un