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Inform research work and policy-making on social protection that might affect the livelihoods of millions of people. Social Protection Spending What is a Budget Spending Review? The Budget Spending Review is a coordinated and in-depth analysis of baseline expenditures that helps: 1. (...) It is The functional classification was used in the first part of the review to map spending on social protection in Lebanon. Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 22 Social Protection is a key function of Government spending and provides a straightforward estimation of social spending. (...) A significant amount of spending is not categorized under the social protection functional classification but could be captured in the scope of this study as social spending.
Language:English
Score: 808675.73 - https://www.unicef.org/lebanon...view%20policy%20Brief%20EN.pdf
Data Source: un
Overview of Data Sources Consulted 7 Table A2. Military Spending vs. Social Protection 8 BIBLIOGRAPHY 9 1.1 OVERVIEW This paper leverages publicly available data1 to compare trends in government spending on the military2with spending on human security (social protection, education, and health). (...) Data for military spending versus spending on health and education, is available for a wider set of countries and a slightly longer time series (through 2019). (...) Many of these countries saw military spending increase between 2019-2020 (as a percentage of GDP and as a share of government spending).12 For instance, Nigeria saw the share of government spending allocated to the military increase from 3.6 per cent to 5 per cent.
Language:English
Score: 806874.7 - https://www.unwomen.org/sites/...human-security-spending-en.pdf
Data Source: un
Coinciding with  the ongoing Global Days of Action on Military Spending and complementary to the recent release of the annual military spending data by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), the Office for Disarmament Affairs is pleased to publish the second volume, UNODA Occasional Papers 35 , on rethinking unconstrained military spending. The papers address the issue of military spending from various angles by examining the impact of military expenditures on international security; the relationship between military spending and the Sustainable Development Goals; the importance of gender perspectives in rethinking military spending; and lessons learned from economic conversion movements. Occasional Paper No. 35 on Rethinking Unconstrained Military Spending   In “ How unconstrained military spending harms international security ”, Samuel Perlo-Freeman from the Campaign Against Arms Trade , argues that continuous growth in military spending negatively impacts international security in four ways.
Language:English
Score: 800370.46 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...constrained-military-spending/
Data Source: un
Despite this progress, measuring social public spending in the region has been understood mainly as an exercise in accounting and therefore, spending is not associated to social policy goals. (...) The measurement of social public spending has been understood mainly as an accounting exercise and therefore social spending is not associated to public policy goals.     While in 1990-1991 only seven countries allocated over 10% of their GDP to social spending, by 2005-2006 14 countries were doing so, with four of them spending more than 20% of their GDP.            
Language:English
Score: 799250.73 - https://www.cepal.org/notes/65/EnFoco_GastoSocial
Data Source: un
Coinciding with  the ongoing Global Days of Action on Military Spending and complementary to the recent release of the annual military spending data by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), the Office for Disarmament Affairs is pleased to publish the second volume, UNODA Occasional Papers 35 , on rethinking unconstrained military spending. The papers address the issue of military spending from various angles by examining the impact of military expenditures on international security; the relationship between military spending and the Sustainable Development Goals; the importance of gender perspectives in rethinking military spending; and lessons learned from economic conversion movements. Occasional Paper No. 35 on Rethinking Unconstrained Military Spending   In “ How unconstrained military spending harms international security ”, Samuel Perlo-Freeman from the Campaign Against Arms Trade , argues that continuous growth in military spending negatively impacts international security in four ways.
Language:English
Score: 798368.3 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...constrained-military-spending/
Data Source: un
Coinciding with  the ongoing Global Days of Action on Military Spending and complementary to the recent release of the annual military spending data by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), the Office for Disarmament Affairs is pleased to publish the second volume, UNODA Occasional Papers 35 , on rethinking unconstrained military spending. The papers address the issue of military spending from various angles by examining the impact of military expenditures on international security; the relationship between military spending and the Sustainable Development Goals; the importance of gender perspectives in rethinking military spending; and lessons learned from economic conversion movements. Occasional Paper No. 35 on Rethinking Unconstrained Military Spending   In “ How unconstrained military spending harms international security ”, Samuel Perlo-Freeman from the Campaign Against Arms Trade , argues that continuous growth in military spending negatively impacts international security in four ways.
Language:English
Score: 798368.3 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...constrained-military-spending/
Data Source: un
Coinciding with  the ongoing Global Days of Action on Military Spending and complementary to the recent release of the annual military spending data by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), the Office for Disarmament Affairs is pleased to publish the second volume, UNODA Occasional Papers 35 , on rethinking unconstrained military spending. The papers address the issue of military spending from various angles by examining the impact of military expenditures on international security; the relationship between military spending and the Sustainable Development Goals; the importance of gender perspectives in rethinking military spending; and lessons learned from economic conversion movements. Occasional Paper No. 35 on Rethinking Unconstrained Military Spending   In “ How unconstrained military spending harms international security ”, Samuel Perlo-Freeman from the Campaign Against Arms Trade , argues that continuous growth in military spending negatively impacts international security in four ways.
Language:English
Score: 798368.3 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...constrained-military-spending/
Data Source: un
Coinciding with  the ongoing Global Days of Action on Military Spending and complementary to the recent release of the annual military spending data by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), the Office for Disarmament Affairs is pleased to publish the second volume, UNODA Occasional Papers 35 , on rethinking unconstrained military spending. The papers address the issue of military spending from various angles by examining the impact of military expenditures on international security; the relationship between military spending and the Sustainable Development Goals; the importance of gender perspectives in rethinking military spending; and lessons learned from economic conversion movements. Occasional Paper No. 35 on Rethinking Unconstrained Military Spending   In “ How unconstrained military spending harms international security ”, Samuel Perlo-Freeman from the Campaign Against Arms Trade , argues that continuous growth in military spending negatively impacts international security in four ways.
Language:English
Score: 798368.3 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...constrained-military-spending/
Data Source: un
UNODA Launches Occasional Papers On Rethinking Unconstrained Military Spending – UNODA     Welcome to the United Nations. (...) The papers address the issue of military spending from various angles by examining the impact of military expenditures on international security; the relationship between military spending and the Sustainable Development Goals; the importance of gender perspectives in rethinking military spending; and lessons learned from economic conversion movements. Occasional Paper No. 35 on Rethinking Unconstrained Military Spending   In “ How unconstrained military spending harms international security ”, Samuel Perlo-Freeman from the Campaign Against Arms Trade , argues that continuous growth in military spending negatively impacts international security in four ways.
Language:English
Score: 796376.1 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...constrained-military-spending/
Data Source: un
Efficiency of the public spending in the irrigation and hydropower sectors This dimension shows the level of decentralization and participation in both sectors; as well as the timely utilization of budgetary appropriations as a measure of efficiency of governance and the credibility of public budget. DIMENSIONS SUB-DIMENSIONS & INDICATORS RADAR GRAPHS AND INDEXES Strategic priorities and political commitment of government and donors Irrigation projects budget in agricultural public budget (%) Hydropower projects budget in energy public budget (%) Irrigation projects budget in total public budget (%) Hydropower projects budget in total public budget (%) Irrigation projects budget in total donor budget (%) Hydropower projects budget in total donor budget (%) Efficiency of the public spending in the irrigation and hydropower sector Decentralization and participation Share of public spending in irrigation by: Central government units (%) Regional government units (%) Local government units (%) Share of public spending in hydropower by: Central government units (%) Regional government units (%) Local government units (%) Timely utilization of budgetary appropriations Share of actual spending on planned public spending for irrigation projects (%) Share of actual spending on planned public spending for hydropower (%) Indicator Name Year(s) Value Unit Source Comment Irrigation projects budget in agricultural public budget % Hydropower projects budget in energy public budget % Irrigation projects budget in total public budget % Hydropower projects budget in total public budget % Irrigation projects budget in total donor budget % Hydropower projects budget in total donor budget % Indicator Name Year(s) Value Unit Source Comment Share of public spending in irrigation by central government units % Share of public spending in hydropower by central government units % Share of public spending in irrigation by regional government units % Share of public spending in hydropower by regional government units % Share of public spending in irrigation by local government units % Share of public spending in hydropower by local government units % Indicator Name Year(s) Value Unit Source Comment Share of actual spending on planned public spending for hydropower projects % Share of actual spending on planned public spending for irrigation projects % Institutional and Policy Index (IPoI) Country IPoI - Agriculture IPoI - Hydropower IPoI - Agriculture 0-20 Low commitment in investing in water for agriculture. 21-40 Moderate commitment in investing in water for agriculture. 41-60 Considerable commitment in investing in water for agriculture. 61-80 High commitment in investing in water for agriculture. 81-100 Very high commitment in investing in water for agriculture.
Language:English
Score: 795455.86 - https://www.fao.org/nr/water/a...stment-tools/dti/tool/ipt/data
Data Source: un