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VISIT TO THE LAO PEOPLE<U+2019>S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC : REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON EXTREME POVERTY AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Although the Government has made important commitments, actual social spending has too often fallen short, remained low by regional standards and not increased in line with GDP growth. (...) According to a development partner, in 2017, spending on health was 1.7 per cent of GDP, the same as it was in the period 2010/11, and 6.5 per cent of the government budget, against a target of 9 per cent.15 Spending on education was 3.11 per cent of GDP and 13.4 per cent of the budget, against a target of 17 per cent. (...) The Government should increase health spending in line with regional trends and develop a detailed profile of populations that do not have adequate access to health care.
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 956180.1 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=A/HRC/41/39/ADD.2&Lang=F
Source de données: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON EXTREME POVERTY AND HUMAN RIGHTS ON HIS MISSION TO SAUDI ARABIA : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
They reflect a traditional welfare rather than an empowerment approach and result in significant social spending on the non- poor (so-called “leakage”). In order to effectively reduce poverty in Saudi Arabia and to prevent wasteful and unjust spending of social welfare funds on the non-poor, newly designed social assistance measures should be directed towards the poorest in Saudi society. (...) According to the authoritative Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) database, Saudi Arabia spent 13.7 per cent of its GDP on military expenditure in 2015, which equals US$ 2,778 per capita.27 In meetings with government officials, the Special Rapporteur was told that the 2016 social security budget of Saudi Arabia was around SRI 31 billion, which is only 15 per cent of the SRI 205 billion that Saudi Arabia acknowledges spending on the military in 2016.28 Independent observers suggest that the figure is actually much higher, and that social spending is less than 10 per cent of defence spending.29 In a context of vast and relatively reliable oil revenues, lavish military spending might be seen to be less problematic. (...) Government funding increasingly targets specific priorities, but there is little meaningful oversight and monitoring of the effectiveness of charity spending. Various interlocutors criticized charities as being “amiable amateurs”, providing “charitable” services without focusing on structural means to help their beneficiaries out of poverty.
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 956180.1 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=A/HRC/35/26/ADD.3&Lang=F
Source de données: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE RIGHT OF EVERYONE TO THE ENJOYMENT OF THE HIGHEST ATTAINABLE STANDARD OF PHYSICAL AND MENTAL HEALTH, ANAND GROVER :ADDENDUM
This is demonstrated by National Assembly resolution 18, which commits the Government to ensure the growth rate of spending on health consistently exceeds the growth rate of overall government spending,13 and the fact that Government spending on health has risen from 4.8 per cent to 10.2 per cent between 2002 and 2008.14 12. (...) Furthermore, in order to reduce costs and facilitate efficient public spending on health care, the Government must take additional steps. (...) The Special Rapporteur commends the Government for its commitment to expanding the scope of SHI coverage, as demonstrated by the fact that SHI expenditure as a proportion of total public health spending rose from 7.9 per cent to 17.6 per cent between 2005 and 2008.29 The SHI, however, in its current form still does not adequately ensure universal access to health care.
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 948050.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=A/HRC/20/15/ADD.2&Lang=F
Source de données: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE RIGHT TO EDUCATION, VERNOR MUNOZ VILLALOBOS: ADDENDUM
State expenditure on education 26. Social spending by the State of Guatemala on education is allocated under different budgetary categories. The following general distinctions can be made: (a) Spending by institution: This is usually about 2 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP), which is earmarked for the Ministry of Education; (b) Spending by purpose and function: This represents between 2.5 and 2.7 per cent of GDP. (...) There is also an urgent need to improve efficiency in the execution of spending earmarked for social programmes and especially for the education sector since, even with the current meagre budget, not all the resources budgeted for the education system are being invested.
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 937799.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=A/HRC/11/8/ADD.3&Lang=F
Source de données: ods
REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE EFFECTS OF FOREIGN DEBT AND OTHER RELATED INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS OF STATES ON THE FULL ENJOYMENT OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, PARTICULARLY ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, CEPHAS LUMINA : ADDENDUM
The Government has significantly increased social spending, from 5.4 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2006 to an estimated 8.3 per cent of GDP in 2008.40 This included an expansion of the Human Development Cash Transfer Programme (Bono de Desarrollo Humano) for the poorest households, a US$ 474.3 million increase in spending on housing for low-income families and new programmes in education, training and microfinance. Spending on health care has increased41 to 3.5 per cent of GDP (about US$ 1.8 billion) and free health-care coverage has been expanded, especially for children and pregnant women. 40 The average for the 2000–2006 period was 4.8 per cent of GDP. See Mark Weisbrot and Luis Sandoval, “Update on the Ecuadorian Economy” (Washington, D.C., Center for Economic and Policy Research, June 2009). 41 Between 1990 and 2004, public spending on health averaged 1.1 per cent of GDP. In 2007, this had increased to 1.5 per cent of GDP.
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 937799.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=A/HRC/14/21/ADD.1&Lang=F
Source de données: ods
REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE EFFECTS OF FOREIGN DEBT AND OTHER RELATED INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS OF STATES ON THE FULL ENJOYMENT OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, PARTICULARLY ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, CEPHAS LUMINA : ADDENDUM
Despite their limitations, these schemes have afforded some heavily indebted poor countries fiscal space to increase spending on basic social services such as health and education. (...) In this context, foreign assistance provides much of the budget revenue and funds for capital spending, sustaining a large portion of the country’s economy. 40. (...) However, there is widespread concern that a recent freeze on public sector spending (including a halt in recruitments and wage spending) may be linked to fiscal requirements of this programme and that such policy may undermine the efforts of development partners to build the human resources capacity of the Government.
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 935790.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=A/HRC/17/37/ADD.1&Lang=F
Source de données: ods
GE.11-25802 (F)
Such changes will also require reallocation of the budget resources with less spending on survey activities and more spending on technologies, software and methodologies and work with owners of administrative data sources to develop and maintain cooperation on data exchange.
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 926763.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...DS=ECE/CES/GE.42/2011/2&Lang=F
Source de données: ods
REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE EFFECTS OF FOREIGN DEBT AND OTHER RELATED INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS OF STATES ON THE FULL ENJOYMENT OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, PARTICULARLY ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, CEPHAS LUMINA : ADDENDUM
With the economy in recovery, fiscal consolidation has focused more on revenue increases through taxes than on budget cuts. However, spending cuts have remained, particularly through temporary cuts in payments to personal pension schemes. (...) It is notable that the austerity measures, particularly those entailing reductions in public spending, were opposed by politicians, trade unions, certain business circles, students, teachers and the public, including through public demonstrations when the 2010 State budget bill was passed. 27. (...) Prior to the crisis, the Government had embarked on reforms in the health sector to improve its performance.67 However, as opposed to the trend in most European Union countries, Latvia did not increase health spending as a percentage of GDP in the decade prior to the crisis.
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 925556.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=A/HRC/23/37/ADD.1&Lang=F
Source de données: ods
VISIT TO LEBANON - REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON EXTREME POVERTY AND HUMAN RIGHTS, OLIVIER DE SCHUTTER
Pre-crisis inequality and poor public spending ..................................................................... 13 C. (...) They include devising an economic recovery plan centred on social justice by acknowledging and distributing the Banque du Liban losses fairly and transparently; increasing and improving spending on social protection and public services as key investments in the country’s future; addressing wealth inequality by reforming the tax system for a better redistributive impact and less fraud and avoidance; and reforming the electricity sector to ingrain transparency and fair pricing systems. (...) Concentration of economic power and the capture of the State by economic actors seeking to strengthen their rentier positions have made the economic situation of Lebanon worse. Of total spending by the Council for Development and Reconstruction between 2008 and 2018, 60 per cent or $1.9 billion was granted to only 10 companies, widely known to be 56 Despite multiple attempts to meet with the Association of Banks of Lebanon, the Special Rapporteur was unable to speak with representatives of commercial banks during his visit. 57 IMF and World Bank, “Financial sector assessment: Lebanon, December 2016”, para. 55. 58 Toufic Gaspard, “Financial crisis in Lebanon” (2017), pp. 11–12. 59 IMF, 2016 Article IV Consultation (2017), p. 11. 60 Official pegged rate, 31 March 2021. 61 IMF, “Why worry about corruption?”
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 925556.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=A/HRC/50/38/ADD.1&Lang=F
Source de données: ods
LETTER DATED 29 JULY 2019 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ARMENIA TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
Thus, the highest share of public spending has been allocated to various social security programs, though the amount of social spending remains low in absolute terms and in terms of GDP (figure 3). Social spending was 7.0 percent of GDP in 2018. Sections below summarize the achievements and challenges in Artsakh’s efforts towards sustainable development along its three dimensions - economic, social and environmental dimensions. (...) Opportunities and solutions: Many health indicators can be improved through increasing public or private spending on health and enhancing the quality, availability and accessibility of healthcare services.
Langue:Français
Ponctuation: 904105.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/74/282&Lang=F
Source de données: ods