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So far, the initiative has helped maintain spending on health and social protection in the 46 participating countries. However, education spending has already contracted over the past year. Indebted countries have also reportedly cut spending on child protection, nutrition and water, sanitation and hygiene services, the report says.
Language:English
Score: 681196.1 - https://www.unicef.org/press-r...bt-education-health-and-social
Data Source: un
.  Expenditure raising policies, e.g. levels, composition and sources of government spending.  Expenditure-switching policies, e.g. exchange rate management. Advancing social justice, promoting decent work 7 Aggregate supply measures target employment growth through increasing the availability and quality of production and the factors used to engage in production  For example, by spending on health or education human capabilities can be raised, similarly, spending on physical infrastructure can increase productivity. (...) We should:  appreciate the complementarities between public consumption and investment expenditure, the former generally understood as referring to spending on government goods and services, via either salary costs (teachers, nurses, civil servants and so on) or the purchase of goods (medicine supplies, textbooks etc.);  acknowledge the integration between raising demand in the short term and transforming supply capacity in the long term (achieving structural transformation); and  appreciate that public sector spending most often “crowds in” private sector spending.
Language:English
Score: 681082.7 - www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/grou...s/presentation/wcms_828715.pdf
Data Source: un
NEED TO INCREASE PUBLIC SPENDING ON HEALTH 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Kenya Liberia Sierra Leone Tanzania Uganda 37% 18% 75% 32% 48% 29% 32% 18% 40% 26% 34% 50% 7% 28% 26% Sh ar e in to ta l s pe nd in g Private Government Other LOW PER CAPITA SPENDING ON HEALTH - WHO RECOMMENDATION OF MINIMUM OF $44 PER CAPITA. $13.9 $23.4 $30.9 $36.2 $37.2 $37.3 $42.4 $54.9 $62.7 $68.5 $75.0 $79.6 $87.2 $103.5 $136.6 $186.3 $266.6 $282.9 $358.3 $431.9 $438.6 $689.3 $1,236.1 $0.0 $200.0 $400.0 $600.0 $800.0 $1,000.0 $1,200.0 $1,400.0 Eritrea Burundi Malawi Kenya Guinea-Bissau Tanzania Uganda Liberia Rwanda Sierra Leone Ghana Nigeria Zambia Sudan Egypt, Arab Rep. (...)  At national level, risk of having sent too much to the counties; for health in 2013/14, 51%  Budgetary priorities set by county govts  While health & infrastructure spending account for approx 70% of total cost of devolved functions, how much is allocated by counties? (...) Need to increase public spending on health Low per capita spending on health - WHO recommendation of minimum of $44 per capita.
Language:English
Score: 681034.1 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...ts/2013/bernadette_wanjala.pdf
Data Source: un
To ensure access to and utilization of these services by the most disadvantaged children, more investment as well as joint planning across sectors are needed. 5. Safeguard Social Spending: The COVID-19 crisis has greatly impacted children and it is crucial to safeguard spending on health, education, social protection, and other social sectors. (...) National data on tracking social sector spending is key to better monitor investments in social sectors. (...) The SDG indicator 1.a.2 gives specific emphasis on investing and tracking social spending, and 1.b.1 emphasizes that public social spending should reach the poor.
Language:English
Score: 681034.1 - https://www.unicef.org/media/105146/file
Data Source: un
Between 1998 and 2003, this relationship weakened as the fluctuations in social spending were actually lower than those in GDP. According to the ECLAC study, most social spending sub-categories in the region have become less volatile, except for health spending, which showed an increased volatility and pro-cyclicality during 1998-2003. (...) Public spending injections for these purposes may, however, put upward pressure on the RER. (...) More efficient budget allocations There are at least three mechanisms of more efficient budget allocations through which one could seek to create more fiscal space for MDG spending. First, resetting priorities across budget items could create more space for MDG-related spending.
Language:English
Score: 679738.23 - https://www.un.org/development...chive/dps_paper_vos_270208.pdf
Data Source: un
He argued that responses to depression should stimulate the economy with an inducement to invest through a combination of two approaches: a reduc-tion that it was up to the government to “create in interest rates and government investment in an economic upturn”, by making “defi nite addi-tions infrastructure. to the purchasing power of the nation”.23 At Investment by government boosts workers’ in-comes, the time however, proponents of the New Deal were not typically associated with Keynesian arguments for government spending as a vehicle for recovery, as they favored balanced budgets. The New Deal did in fact engage in defi cit spending since at least 1933, but the Democratic party was typically apologetic about this, because the rise in national debt opposed its party philosophy. resulting in more spending in the general economy, thereby stimulating production and investment, and resulting in more income and spending.
Language:English
Score: 679672.46 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ...s2/web/WebSearch/page0022.html
Data Source: un
Estimate of £70m a year in the first year after release of the main census data. (£67m in year two) Example Three - Direct Marketing Advertising spend on targeted emails/letters and local geographic adverts on billboards and bus stops where small area census data is used to target activity. Excludes rest of advertising spend (radio, TV and newspaper ads) UK spend = £15.2bn - Direct Marketing Association (DMA), ‘Putting a Price on Direct Marketing’ England and Wales = 92% of the total UK (ONS GVA Statistics) 62% of total is on Business to Business campaigns. (DMA) So, direct marketing spending where census data is used amounts to £5.5bn Data spend 3-4% of the value of the business (industry best practice) 20% of this data is Census data (industry experts) Benefit decays by 50% over the 10 years after a census (estimate from industry experts).
Language:English
Score: 678640.4 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...ides_for_FAO_January_2017.pptx
Data Source: un
Fiscal adjustment and social spending | Publication | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Publications » Fiscal adjustment and social spending Available in: English Fiscal adjustment and social spending December 1994 | Regular Publications, Reviews and Bulletins » CEPAL Review Economic development Social development Statistics Author: Cominetti, Rossella UN symbol.: LC/G.1845-P p. 47-60 December 1994 Download Publication pdf Description The external and internal imbalances that appeared in the early 1980s, together with the adjustment and stabilization policies applied throughout that decade in Latin America, juxtaposed the need to reduce the fiscal deficit with the need to make up for the loss of income sustained by the most vulnerable groups of the population as a consequence of the external debt crisis. This article examines patterns of social expenditure in a number of countries in the region, in an effort to determine how these policies affected the level and composition of social spending and, hence, influenced social policy. As a method of analysis, the author reviews patterns of social spending during various episodes of fiscal adjustment and maladjustment in each of these countries and compares them with the trends observed in those countries' public-sector finances. (...) View bibliographical record in the Digital Repository You might be interested in Ajuste fiscal y gasto social Financing decentralization Equity in the public budget Fiscal policy and the economic cycle in Chile Search publications See publications list Topics Fiscal affairs Social investment/spending Financing and external debt Public income and expenditure CEPAL Review no.54 Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 678640.4 - https://www.cepal.org/en/publi...adjustment-and-social-spending
Data Source: un
العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español Language AREAS OF WORK Weapons of Mass Destruction Conventional Arms Regional Disarmament Transparency and Confidence-Building Other Disarmament Issues ABOUT UNODA About Strategy High Representative Organigram UNODA Structure Contact DISARMAMENT BODIES AND INSTITUTIONS Disarmament in the General Assembly Disarmament in the Security Council United Nations Disarmament Commission Conference on Disarmament Secretary General’s Advisory Board Fellowship Programme UNIDIR DATABASE AND RESEARCH TOOLS UNODA Documents Library First Committee and Resolutions Database Disarmament Treaties Military Expenditure The Global Reported Arms Trade UNIDIR’s Cyber Security Portal RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Updates UNODA Calendar Disarmament Education Fact Sheets on Disarmament Issues Proposal for Funding STATEMENTS AND PRESS RELEASES Secretary General’s Statements High Representative’s Statements Press Releases OFFICES AWAY FROM UNHQ Geneva, Switzerland Vienna, Austria Lima, Peru Lome, Togo Kathmandu, Nepal العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 35, April 2020 Rethinking Unconstrained Military Spending Download PDF English Order hard copy UN Publications Overview This publication addresses the issue of military spending from various angles by examining the impact of military expenditures on international security; the relationship between military spending and the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; the importance of gender perspectives in rethinking unconstrained military spending; and lessons learned from economic conversion movements. It has been published in support of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Secretary-General’s Agenda for Disarmament to promote renewed research and analysis on the relationship between military spending and economic and social development. Author s Samuel Perlo-Freeman, (Campaign Against Arms Trade) Nan Tian, Diego Lopes da Silva and Alexandra Kuimova (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute) Ray Acheson and Madeleine Rees (Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom) Miriam Pemberton (Institute for Policy Studies) and William D.
Language:English
Score: 678221.44 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ional-papers-no-35-april-2020/
Data Source: un
UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 35, April 2020 – UNODA     欢迎来到联合国 العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español Language AREAS OF WORK Weapons of Mass Destruction Conventional Arms Regional Disarmament Transparency and Confidence-Building Other Disarmament Issues ABOUT UNODA About Strategy High Representative Organigram UNODA Structure Contact DISARMAMENT BODIES AND INSTITUTIONS Disarmament in the General Assembly Disarmament in the Security Council United Nations Disarmament Commission Conference on Disarmament Secretary General’s Advisory Board Fellowship Programme UNIDIR DATABASE AND RESEARCH TOOLS UNODA Documents Library First Committee and Resolutions Database Disarmament Treaties Military Expenditure The Global Reported Arms Trade UNIDIR’s Cyber Security Portal RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS Publications Updates UNODA Calendar Disarmament Education Fact Sheets on Disarmament Issues Proposal for Funding STATEMENTS AND PRESS RELEASES Secretary General’s Statements High Representative’s Statements Press Releases OFFICES AWAY FROM UNHQ Geneva, Switzerland Vienna, Austria Lima, Peru Lome, Togo Kathmandu, Nepal العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español UNODA Occasional Papers – No. 35, April 2020 Rethinking Unconstrained Military Spending Download PDF English Order hard copy UN Publications Overview This publication addresses the issue of military spending from various angles by examining the impact of military expenditures on international security; the relationship between military spending and the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; the importance of gender perspectives in rethinking unconstrained military spending; and lessons learned from economic conversion movements. It has been published in support of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Secretary-General’s Agenda for Disarmament to promote renewed research and analysis on the relationship between military spending and economic and social development. Author s Samuel Perlo-Freeman, (Campaign Against Arms Trade) Nan Tian, Diego Lopes da Silva and Alexandra Kuimova (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute) Ray Acheson and Madeleine Rees (Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom) Miriam Pemberton (Institute for Policy Studies) and William D.
Language:English
Score: 678221.44 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ional-papers-no-35-april-2020/
Data Source: un