Home

Results 81 - 90 of 46,681 for spending. Search took 4.559 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
The data show that the disproportionate burden of domestic work begins early, with girls between 5 and 9 years old spending 30 per cent more time, or 40 million more hours a day, on household chores than boys their age. The disparities grow as girls get older, with 10 to 14 year olds spending 50 per cent more time, or 120 million more hours each day.   (...) The report also found that: Girls between 10 and 14 years old in South Asia and the Middle East and North Africa spend nearly double the amount of time on household chores compared to boys.
Language:English
Score: 685467.72 - https://www.unicef.org/press-r...oing-household-chores-everyday
Data Source: un
These differing trends imply a significant widening of the already large spending disparities seen between low- and high-income countries. (...) Unfortunately, recent increases in public education spending have been associated with relatively small improvements in education outcomes. (...) It will be produced annually following the main release of spending data by UNESCO’s Institute for Statistics.
Language:English
Score: 685467.72 - https://en.unesco.org/gem-repo...ion_Finance_Watch_PR_Eng_0.pdf
Data Source: un
Vivid Economics modelling (fig 1) highlights the short-term strengths of green spending. Figure 1. Job and Gross Value Added (GVA) impacts of green spending policies (average) compared to traditional spending measures in South Africa. (...) Additionally, these investments enable a greener future by reducing emissions. 0% 5% 10% 15% United Kingdom Australia France China India South Africa R e c o v e ry s p e n d in g (% o f G D P ) Green spending Neutral spending Dirty spending Total = $664B Total = $81B 0% 100% Advanced Economies in GRO (24 countries excl. (...) Job and Gross Value Added (GVA) impacts of green spending compared to traditional spending in South Africa for all modelled policies.
Language:English
Score: 685225.3 - https://www.uneca.org/sites/de...overy-for-South-Africa_vf2.pdf
Data Source: un
Hosted by the World Bank in Nairobi, 12 staff from UNFPA, UNICEF, WHO, the World Bank and the PMNCH discussed the development of a document that best makes the case for effective spending and increased investment for the health MDGs. The investment case for health in Africa will position health spending as a very high return investment for countries in the region. (...) HHA aims at launching this publication at the African Union Summit in hopes of obtaining commitments from governments to take on board proposed recommendations The High Level Taskforce reported in 2009 that reducing the levels of mortality and morbidity of populations and meeting the health MDGs will require a sharp increase in national and international funding and an improvement in spending efficiency, especially in Africa. Health spending has for too long been seen as a cost rather than an investment yielding returns.
Language:English
Score: 684930.1 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...armonization_health_africa/en/
Data Source: un
Main reason: inadequate financing and coverage of MNCH interventions Why Asia and the Pacific? Why is spending critical? The 5 I's… 1. Inadequate spending 2. Inefficient spending 3. Inequitable spending 4. Incentiveless spending 5. Incomplete spending and implementation What to invest in? How much will it cost?
Language:English
Score: 684228.6 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...mbernews/2009/Axelson_apic.pdf
Data Source: un
Statement by the High Representative for Disarmament Affairs Global Days of Action on Military Spending 13 April – 9 May 2019 1 Upward trends in militarization continue unabated. Global military spending is at its highest since the end of the Cold War. (...) On the occasion of the Global Days of Action on Military Spending, I echo the call of the Secretary-General for the international community to “rethink” unconstrained military spending by prioritizing investment that generates growth and opportunity for communities.
Language:English
Score: 683240.5 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ction-on-Military-Spending.pdf
Data Source: un
There is an urgent need for disaggregated expenditure in the sector to shed light on spending patterns and potential spending inefficiencies. 5. (...) South Sudan has the lowest education spending in East Africa Within the region, South Sudan’s aggre- gate education sector spending levels are very low. (...) Education budget brief Section 4: Spending by Levels of Education The period 2013/14–2017/18 saw a marked variation of spending in the sector.
Language:English
Score: 682720.7 - https://www.unicef.org/southsu...019-Education-Budget-Brief.pdf
Data Source: un
The study, Still bearing the burden: how poor rural women in Bangladesh are paying most for climate risks , surveyed 3094 households from the rural areas of ten selected districts in Bangladesh to assess their exposure to climate change and their spending patterns on reducing the risks of climate-related disasters. (...) Across the districts, 83 per cent of households are affected by climate-related disasters and are spending about US$93 (BDTk 7493) a year privately on measures to reduce their risks. (...) The survey shows women tend to care more about reducing damage from climate-related disasters but in almost all cases, households headed by women are poorer and cannot spend at the same level as those headed by men. They therefore spend a greater share of their income on climate adaptation. 
Language:English
Score: 681325.73 - https://www.undp.org/banglades...ladesh-30-cent-their-outgoings
Data Source: un
Seven of the 18 low income countries surveyed in the Report cut education spending in 2009. These countries had 3.7 million children out of school.  Donor spending (aid to education)  Donors have not met the commitments they made in 2005 to increase aid. (...) The average duration of violent conflict episodes in low income countries was 12 years.  In conflict-affected poor countries, children face major barriers to education:  28 million children of primary school age are out of school – 42% of the world total.  Children in conflict-affected poor countries are twice as likely to die before their fifth birthday as children in other poor countries.  Only 79% of young people are literate in conflict-affected poor countries.  The world’s 43 million refugees and internally displaced people have limited access to education: In 2008, just 69% of primary school age refugee children in UNHCR camps were attending primary school.  Schools, schoolchildren and teachers are being deliberately targeted in conflict:  In Afghanistan, at least 613 attacks on schools were recorded in 2009, up from 347 in 2008.  In Thailand’s three southernmost provinces, 63 students and 24 teachers and education personnel were killed or injured in 2008 and 2009.  Of the rapes reported in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, one-third involve children (and 13% are against children under the age of 10).  The ‘youth bulge’: In many conflict-affected countries, over 60% of the population is aged under 25, but education systems are not providing youth with the skills they need to escape poverty, unemployment and the economic despair that often contributes to violent conflict.  The humanitarian aid system is failing children caught up in conflict: Education accounts for only 2% of humanitarian aid.  Donors’ security agendas are compromising the effectiveness of education aid: Education aid to conflict-affected states is heavily skewed towards countries seen as strategic priorities.  Armed conflict is diverting public funds from education into military spending:  It would take just six days of military spending by aid donors to close the US$16 billion Education for All external financing gap.  Twenty-one developing countries are currently spending more on arms than on primary schools – if they were to divert just 10% of military spending to education, they could put an additional 9.5 million children into school.  Pakistan, which has one of the world’s largest out-of-school populations (7.3 million in 2008), spends over seven times as much on arms as on primary schools.
Language:English
Score: 681325.73 - https://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/j..._for_all_facts_and_figures.pdf
Data Source: un
The data show that the disproportionate burden of domestic work begins early, with girls between 5 and 9 years old spending 30 per cent more time, or 40 million more hours a day, on household chores than boys their age. The numbers rise as girls get older, with 10 to 14 year olds spending 50 per cent more time, or 120 million more hours each day.      (...) The report also found that: Girls between 10 and 14 years old in South Asia and the Middle East and North Africa spend nearly double the amount of time on household chores compared to boys.
Language:English
Score: 681252.83 - https://www.unicef.org/turkey/en/node/2311
Data Source: un