Home

Results 1 - 10 of 930,955 for spending plan. Search took 0.334 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
Efficiency of the public spending in the irrigation and hydropower sectors This dimension shows the level of decentralization and participation in both sectors; as well as the timely utilization of budgetary appropriations as a measure of efficiency of governance and the credibility of public budget. DIMENSIONS SUB-DIMENSIONS & INDICATORS RADAR GRAPHS AND INDEXES Strategic priorities and political commitment of government and donors Irrigation projects budget in agricultural public budget (%) Hydropower projects budget in energy public budget (%) Irrigation projects budget in total public budget (%) Hydropower projects budget in total public budget (%) Irrigation projects budget in total donor budget (%) Hydropower projects budget in total donor budget (%) Efficiency of the public spending in the irrigation and hydropower sector Decentralization and participation Share of public spending in irrigation by: Central government units (%) Regional government units (%) Local government units (%) Share of public spending in hydropower by: Central government units (%) Regional government units (%) Local government units (%) Timely utilization of budgetary appropriations Share of actual spending on planned public spending for irrigation projects (%) Share of actual spending on planned public spending for hydropower (%) Indicator Name Year(s) Value Unit Source Comment Irrigation projects budget in agricultural public budget % Hydropower projects budget in energy public budget % Irrigation projects budget in total public budget % Hydropower projects budget in total public budget % Irrigation projects budget in total donor budget % Hydropower projects budget in total donor budget % Indicator Name Year(s) Value Unit Source Comment Share of public spending in irrigation by central government units % Share of public spending in hydropower by central government units % Share of public spending in irrigation by regional government units % Share of public spending in hydropower by regional government units % Share of public spending in irrigation by local government units % Share of public spending in hydropower by local government units % Indicator Name Year(s) Value Unit Source Comment Share of actual spending on planned public spending for hydropower projects % Share of actual spending on planned public spending for irrigation projects % Institutional and Policy Index (IPoI) Country IPoI - Agriculture IPoI - Hydropower IPoI - Agriculture 0-20 Low commitment in investing in water for agriculture. 21-40 Moderate commitment in investing in water for agriculture. 41-60 Considerable commitment in investing in water for agriculture. 61-80 High commitment in investing in water for agriculture. 81-100 Very high commitment in investing in water for agriculture.
Language:English
Score: 1063484 - https://www.fao.org/nr/water/a...stment-tools/dti/tool/ipt/data
Data Source: un
Figure 10: Nominal and real spending in health Figure 11: Per-capita spending in health (in USD) (in ETB billion) Source: Data from Amhara Plan Commission. (...) Figure 14: Regional and woreda level spending of the health sector Source: Data from Amhara Plan Commission. (...) Figure 17: Capital and recurrent education expenditure Figure 18: Salary and operational education expenditure (percentage of education spending) (percentage of total recurrent education spending) Source: Data from Amhara Plan Commission.
Language:English
Score: 1062926.3 - https://www.unicef.org/ethiopi...0regional%20budget%20brief.pdf
Data Source: un
Public Expenditure Analysis Linkages Budget Cycle Public Spending Analysis Scope/Key Questions Data Requirements Types of Analysis Areas of Recommendations Potential Entry Points 1) Sector Objectives and Strategy (Budget Planning Phase) Intended Focus of Public Spending: Question: What are the Govt. national and sector objectives & strategies? (...) /Local Govt. guidelines for project appraisal - Training and HR plans 4) Monitoring and Evaluation Governance/Accountability of Public Spending: Question: What indicators are used to measure performance? Who is accountable for public spending outcomes, and to whom are they accountable?
Language:English
Score: 1052281.4 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...enditure_Analysis_Linkages.pdf
Data Source: un
This increased to 60% in 2017, but fell back to 54% in 2019, and is planned to decline further to 51% in 2021. Every one percent of the GoG budget in 2021 equals GH₵ 435 million; so if the 60% share achieved in 2017 had been maintained through to 2021, spending on social services would have been GH₵ 3.9 billion, or 17% higher than planned, in 2021. - From 2015 to 2019, spending on social services grew at an average annual rate of 17% compared to 16% growth in the Total GoG budget. (...) The effective rollout of GIFMIS is exceptionally important to ensuring there is consolidated information on the funds available within each MDA for the delivery of services. 5 Releasing funds according to the Approved Budget The budget sets out the Government’s spending plans for the year. If the Approved Budget is not accurate it compromises the effective delivery of social services because line ministries and MMDAs cannot plan their spending in advance. (...) To improve the quality of spending on particularly social services, the Government needs to work towards improving the accuracy of the Approved Budget by ensuring: accurate forecasts of expected revenues when setting the overall budget envelope at the beginning of the budget process; basing budget on detailed analyses of historical and planned programme spending trends; and ensuring the release for funds in line with the Approved Budget.
Language:English
Score: 1052192.8 - https://www.unicef.org/ghana/m...dget%20Brief%20-%20Summary.pdf
Data Source: un
Figure 5: Execution rates of recurrent spending across MoH programmes Prevention and health education Hospital services Management and administration Policy, planning and health research Coordination health activities: Pemba Curative services Management and administration of hospital 91% 97% 91% 94% 97% 99% 67% 98% 75% 100% 95% 100% 100% 100% 2015/16 Recurrent 2016/17 Recurrent Source: IFMIS. Figure 6: Execution rates of development spending across MoH programmes Prevention and health education Hospital services Policy, planning and health research 2015/16 Development budget 2016/17 Development budget 78% 11% 1% 15% 33% 99% Source: IFMIS. (...) Only 8 per cent of planned development spending was realized in FY 2015/16, improving to 40 per cent in FY 2016/17.
Language:English
Score: 1051461.7 - https://www.unicef.org/tanzani...r-2018-Health-Budget-Brief.pdf
Data Source: un
Because no household health expenditure survey has been conducted in Liberia since 2009, this document highlights the first part of the full NHA exercise, focusing only on the institutional health spending. Part 2 of this NHA exercise is planned for FY 2012/13 to incorporate household spending on health. (...) Because no household health expenditure survey has been conducted in Liberia since 2009, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) will conduct the current NHA exercise in two installments.  Part 1: Part 1, the topic of this summary report, captures institutional health spending only. It includes all the health spending by government, donors, NGOs, and private employers in 2009/10 and excludes household expenditure.  Part 2: Planned for FY 2012/13, Part 2 will incorporate household spending on health to complete the NHA exercise and capture the magnitude and distribution of total health expenditure. (...) Considering that the primary focus of the national policy and plan is on delivery of the BPHS at the primary level, the reasonableness of this spending breakdown by level requires further analysis.
Language:English
Score: 1035754.9 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/media/events/2013/liberia_nha.pdf
Data Source: un
This methodology was developed by the GPNNA Monitoring Group (hereinafter the "Monitoring Group"), created within the framework of the Multisectoral Commission of the National Action Plan for Children and Adolescents (PNAIA), and which is made up of representatives of the Ministry of Economy and Finance (MEF), the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP), the Ministry of Development and Social Inclusion (MIDIS), the Ministry of Education (MINEDU), the Ministry of Health (MINSA), the Roundtable on Poverty Reduction (MCLCP) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). The development of this methodology has been an important contribution to the country as it allows: Having timely information available for decision making on planning and budgeting issues related to children and adolescents. (...) Strengthening transparency and accountability mechanisms for the enforcement of children and adolescents' rights, established int he Law N° 30362, which raises the Supreme Decree N° 001-2012-MIMP to the status of a law, declaring the allocation of public resources to ensure the compliance of the National Action Plan for Children and Adolescents-PNAIA 2012-2021 as a matter of national interest, and preferential attention.
Language:English
Score: 1033083.2 - https://www.unicef.org/peru/en...ding-children-adolescents-peru
Data Source: un
The UN Office for Disarmament Affairs is a members of the UN standing committee on WPS. National Action Plans According to Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom , 98 UN Member States (51 percent) have adopted a National Action Plan on WPS, and 31 current action plans (32 percent) include references to and specific actions towards disarmament. (...) The Beijing Declaration (1995) includes military spending as a key area of action to enhance social development and gender equality. (...) Selma Ashipala-Musavyi, former Chair of the UN Secretary General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters,  Women around the globe share an immense stake in ending armed violence (2020) Opinion piece by Izumi Nakamitsu, High Representative for Disarmament Affairs and Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, former Executive Director of UN Women, For a safer and more resilient world, put people before runaway military spending (2021) UNODA Occasional Paper 35 (2020) chapter on “A feminist approach for addressing excessive military spending” by Ray Acheson and Madeleine Reesm on the link between gender, militarism and unconstrained military spending.
Language:English
Score: 1030620.4 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...-and-security-and-disarmament/
Data Source: un
In order to fulfill these goals, with the initial cooperation of GTZ and later the AECID, ECLAC developed a model of measurement and analysis in which social spending is understood as the “amount of resources used to finance plans, programmes and projects aimed at generating a positive impact on some social problem.” (...) The challenge ahead lies in expanding and improving the instrument so that it may strengthen the quality of countries’ social policy management and raise their effectiveness and efficiency, while at the same time count with a more exhaustive and comparable system at a regional level. * by the Social Development Division More IN FOCUS Student Lodgings Improve Access to Education in Bolivian Highlands Priorities Set for New Plan of Action for the Information Society How to Measure Social Cohesion in Latin America?           The measurement of social public spending has been understood mainly as an accounting exercise and therefore social spending is not associated to public policy goals.    
Language:English
Score: 1026782.5 - https://www.cepal.org/notes/65/EnFoco_GastoSocial
Data Source: un
This document provides step-by- step guidance for developing an action plan which covers: (i) key asks; (ii) expected results; (iii) target audience; (iv) partners; (v) actions; and (vi) progress. https://www.unicef.org/esa/sites/unicef.org.esa/files/2019-04/Budget-Brief-Impact-Action-Plan-Guide.pdf 3 PART I. (...) Step 1: Initiate the process, establish management arrangements and agree on the scope Step 2: Identify nutrition legislation, policies, strategies and plans Step 3: Map relevant ministries, departments and agencies as well as budget documents Step 4: Collect budget and other information Step 5: Organise and analyse the data Step 6: Write the brief Step 7: Develop a budget brief action plan Step 8: Execute plan and document progress! (...) Step 2: Identify nutrition laws, institutional frameworks, policies, strategies/plans and programs The objectives of Step 2 are, firstly, to establish the nutrition context by reviewing relevant laws, policies, plans, and other statistics.
Language:English
Score: 1025504.6 - https://www.unicef.org/esa/med...on-Budget-Brief-April-2021.pdf
Data Source: un