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The UN Office for Disarmament Affairs is a members of the UN standing committee on WPS. National Action Plans According to Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom , 98 UN Member States (51 percent) have adopted a National Action Plan on WPS, and 31 current action plans (32 percent) include references to and specific actions towards disarmament. (...) The Beijing Declaration (1995) includes military spending as a key area of action to enhance social development and gender equality. (...) Selma Ashipala-Musavyi, former Chair of the UN Secretary General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters,  Women around the globe share an immense stake in ending armed violence (2020) Opinion piece by Izumi Nakamitsu, High Representative for Disarmament Affairs and Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, former Executive Director of UN Women, For a safer and more resilient world, put people before runaway military spending (2021) UNODA Occasional Paper 35 (2020) chapter on “A feminist approach for addressing excessive military spending” by Ray Acheson and Madeleine Reesm on the link between gender, militarism and unconstrained military spending.
Language:English
Score: 888145.5 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...-and-security-and-disarmament/
Data Source: un
Expenditures, investment and financing for sustainable development in Brazil | Publication | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Publications » Expenditures, investment and financing for sustainable development in Brazil Available in: English Expenditures, investment and financing for sustainable development in Brazil November 2002 | ECLAC Series » Environment and Development Sustainable development and human settlements Economic development Statistics Corporate author: NU. (...) If the estimated industrial environmental spending (R$ 160 million) is added, the total spending becomes R$ 4.1 billion (0.34% of GDP), or R$ 23.9 per capita (US$ 9.6 per capita). (...) Search publications See publications list Topics Investment Sustainable development Financing for development Public income and expenditure Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 888096.4 - https://www.cepal.org/en/publi...sustainable-development-brazil
Data Source: un
While the possibility of a revision of the State Budget and of the Economic and Social Plan is under discussion, the Government has reallocated low priority spending to emergency response, and the international community has been mobilizing resources to help Mozambique in filling the financial gap caused by the emergency. (...) This hampers the ability of the Education Sector to effectively plan when not all resources are received. 3.2 Education Sector Support Fund (FASE) Public spending is classified in official documents (i.e. (...) The distribution of school textbooks is the second largest investment program planned for 2019, and it is almost entirely funded by donors. 4.1.2 Recurrent The largest share of recurrent spending as well as total education spending has been dedicated to salaries and remunerations (see Figure #7).
Language:English
Score: 886921.9 - https://www.unicef.org/mozambi...get_Brief_2019_-_Education.pdf
Data Source: un
This type of crowding out can in principle be miti-gated Some stimulus plans have been carefully designed to specify their stance with respect to private sector investment. For example, the Government of New Zealand’s national broadband plan specifi cally seeks to avoid “neither discouraging, nor substituting for, private sector investment” and “avoiding entrenching the position, or lining the pockets, of existing broad-band network providers”. (...) The crowding out effect can also be (partly) compensated for by government spending growing the market for private-sector products through the Source: ITU. 52 Confronting the Crisis: ICT Stimulus Plans for Economic Growth
Language:English
Score: 886034.3 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ...s2/web/WebSearch/page0054.html
Data Source: un
Low budget credibility further hampers social sector spending: Unpredictable revenue flows undermine budget planning processes and result in severe overspending across government. (...) Transfers was the only major spending item that stayed close to the original budget, with salaries, operating costs and capital investments all significantly surpassing planned amounts. (...) In the process, the priority sectors, which originally consumed 82 percent of the total planned budget, increased their overall consumption by five percent following in- year spending changes.
Language:English
Score: 884822.7 - https://www.unicef.org/esa/med...2018-National-Budget-Brief.pdf
Data Source: un
The Observatory is tracking the fiscal rescue and recovery spending of the world’s fifty largest economies, to pin down the level of green spending built into rescue and recovery plans. (...) Spain has earmarked over US$ 7.2 billion for a recovery plan— “ España Puede ”—meant to spur a “just and inclusive energy transition” through direct investment.” (...) While some Advanced Economies and the European Commission account for most of the green recovery spending, the report warns that “for the vast majority of countries, recovery spending has been relatively low and minimally green.”
Language:English
Score: 881982.3 - https://www.un.org/africarenew...very-funds-helping-environment
Data Source: un
Projects are expected to cover a variety of sectors including transportation, energy, sanitation, and agricultural development. The Plan provides for a Green Focus, although details on implementation methodology are not yet available. 1.4 Green stimulus to catalyse future prosperity Although South Africa has made significant rescue-type investments to address short-term health and economic crises compared to other nations in the region, like most African and developing countries, their recovery-type spending is behind many high-income nations. (...) This was recognised in both the 2017-19 National Planning Commission on Just Transition and South Africa’s 2015 Nationally Determined Contribution: “an inclusive and just transition requires time and well-planned low-carbon and climate resilient development.”xxxiii, xxxiv Changes could be supported with investments in human capital. (...) Although the COVID-19 pandemic has introduced pressures to slow the introduction of the plan, recovery spending provides the ideal opportunity to renew this focus.
Language:English
Score: 881522.1 - https://www.uneca.org/sites/de...overy-for-South-Africa_vf2.pdf
Data Source: un
Some data gaps remained unfilled as no integrated financial system allows for easy data collection and aggregation. The Budget Spending Review mapped social spending made from budget allocations over the period between 2017 and 2020. • Planned spending was extracted from the State budget laws of 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020. • Unaudited spending data for the years 2017- dies department at the Budget Directorate, the Directorate of Public Accounting and the Directorate of Disbursement. (...) It is The functional classification was used in the first part of the review to map spending on social protection in Lebanon. Social Protection Spending © Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan 2021 22 Social Protection is a key function of Government spending and provides a straightforward estimation of social spending. (...) Social Protection Spending Figure 18: Cumulative SP spending by social risk between 2017-2019 (thousands of LBP) - excluding NSSF budget When social protection expenditures are analyzed across the lifecycle, the largest share of spending goes to Old Age and Survivors, followed by well-being* and medical care, with very few discrepancies between budgeted and planned amounts.
Language:English
Score: 880209.5 - https://www.unicef.org/lebanon...view%20policy%20Brief%20EN.pdf
Data Source: un
The rest did not have a written plan for using key messages and recommendations. (...) Even more surprising, only around 20 percent of respondents targeted Parliaments in their dissemination and advocacy plans despite their crucial role in promoting and defending social spending. (...) On account of evidence on low execution of the capital budget, the Ministry of Education in Namibia is developing a comprehensive school infrastructure development plan to guide capital spending in education and improve utilization of the capital budget.
Language:English
Score: 879337 - https://www.unicef.org/esa/med...essment-Budget-Briefs-2021.pdf
Data Source: un
WHO | PMNCH/Africa Public Health Alliance press release: African health financing Access Home Alt+0 Content Alt+2 Search Search Navigation Home About Our work News and events Knowledge centre Get involved Language عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Menu News and events Press centre Newsletter Videos Social media PMNCH/Africa Public Health Alliance press release: African health financing Commitments 14 April 2011 | Nairobi, Kenya - African Ministers of Finance, Planning and Economic Development have committed to increase health spending, noting the importance of investing in human development and health in particular to stimulate and sustain economic growth and development. The agreement came at a recent joint conference of African Union ministers of finance, planning and economic affairs, and the U.N. Economic Commission for Africa, held on 28 - 29 March in Addis Ababa. (...) The meeting concluded with ministers committing to “increase resources for health financing and strengthen dialogue and partnership with ministries of health to ensure better understanding of health needs, budgeting and planning requirements and improved use of resources for strengthening health system.”
Language:English
Score: 879030.6 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi..._africanhealthfinancing_pr/en/
Data Source: un