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Social investment/spending | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Topics » Social investment/spending Social investment/spending Available in: English Español Français Português The aims of the Social Development Division include assessment and analysis of the social situation of the population of Latin America and the Caribbean and examination of social policy management and impact. In this connection, one of the Division’s priorities is tracking and analysing the resources going to fund social policy and household spending on social services in the countries of the region. (...) Previous Next More publications Data and Statistics Portal de inversión social en América Latina y el Caribe More videos About Investment/spending News News Alicia Bárcena: “We Must Advance toward a Regional Agenda on Inclusive Social Development on the Road to 2030” Press Release ECLAC: High Levels of Inequality in Latin America Constitute an Obstacle to Sustainable Development Press Release Political Will and Productive and Fiscal Reforms Are Key to Fighting Inequality, Experts Agree at ECLAC Press Release ECLAC Participates in III CELAC Summit and Presents Economic and Social Panorama of Countries More news More briefing notes ReDeSoc news Contact División de Desarrollo social desarrollosocial@cepal.org Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 855782.9 - https://www.cepal.org/en/topics/social-investmentspending
Data Source: un
Social Panorama of Latin America 2019 | Publication | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Publications » Social Panorama of Latin America 2019 Available in: English Español Português Social Panorama of Latin America 2019 December 2019 | Flagships » Social Panorama of Latin America Social development Corporate author: NU. (...) In another vein, the Social Panorama of Latin America 2019 indicates that social spending by central governments rose from 10.3% to 11.3% of GDP between 2011 and 2018, reaching 52.5% of total public spending.The study warns that it is precisely those countries with the lowest levels of social spending that face the greatest challenges to achieving the 2030 Agenda’s targets. (...) We would appreciate your opinion on this document Topics 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Inequality Income distribution Migration Poverty Social investment/spending Social rights Related Publications Publication Social Panorama of Latin America 2018 Related Content Press Release ECLAC: The Region Has Underestimated Inequality Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 855782.9 - https://www.cepal.org/en/publi...al-panorama-latin-america-2019
Data Source: un
Latin America and the Caribbean Are Behind in Research and Development | Press Release | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Press Releases » Latin America and the Caribbean Are Behind in Research and Development Available in: English Español Latin America and the Caribbean Are Behind in Research and Development The United Nations' body underlined the importance of countries implementing policies to develop their technological capacities. 29 November 2004 | Press Release Latin America and the Caribbean are still far behind other regions around the world in terms of research and development. (...) In developed countries, companies spend from US$200 to US$700 per capita on this area. The Latin American countries spending the most are Argentina, Brazil, and Chile, with almost US$50 per capita, while Mexico spends US$33, and Costa Rica, Uruguay and Venezuela slightly over US$20.
Language:English
Score: 855040.6 - https://www.cepal.org/en/comun...agada-investigacion-desarrollo
Data Source: un
Prioritize child poverty in national development strategies and plans: Including child poverty in the national development agenda can have significant impact on reducing it systematically and sustainably. (...) To ensure access to and utilization of these services by the most disadvantaged children, more investment as well as joint planning across sectors are needed. 5. Safeguard Social Spending: The COVID-19 crisis has greatly impacted children and it is crucial to safeguard spending on health, education, social protection, and other social sectors. (...) The SDG indicator 1.a.2 gives specific emphasis on investing and tracking social spending, and 1.b.1 emphasizes that public social spending should reach the poor.
Language:English
Score: 854896.3 - https://www.unicef.org/media/105146/file
Data Source: un
Social protection for the poor in Latin America | Publication | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Publications » Social protection for the poor in Latin America Available in: English Social protection for the poor in Latin America April 2001 | Regular Publications, Reviews and Bulletins » CEPAL Review Social development Statistics Author: Hicks, Norman - Wodon, Quentin UN symbol.: LC/G.2130-P p. 93-113 April 2001 Download Publication pdf Description Confronted with recurrent macroeconomic shocks, governments in Latin America and the Caribbean have increasingly been concerned about establishing or strengthening systems of social protection and safety net programmes. (...) Finally, what has been the actual record in terms of protecting the poor through targeted public spending during crises? The paper finds that because of fiscal constraints during a crisis, social spending is often pro-cyclical when ideally it should be counter-cyclical. (...) Social Panorama of Latin America 2000-2001 Search publications See publications list Topics Social investment/spending Poverty Social policies and programmes Public income and expenditure CEPAL Review no.73 Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 854507.9 - https://www.cepal.org/en/publi...-protection-poor-latin-america
Data Source: un
Section 23. Annual Revenue and Spending Plans 1. In-year revenue collection and spending will be subject to the preparation of annual plans in the manner and format prescribed in regulations under this Act. 2. (...) All spending shall be in accordance with the spending plans approved by the Minister. Any changes to these plans must be notified to the Minister in a period not less than seven (7) working days preceding the month in which the spending plan applies. 5.
Language:English
Score: 853916.8 - https://www.wto.org/english/th..._e/lbr_e/WTACCLBR15_LEG_13.pdf
Data Source: un
OMC | Publications - The political resource curse ORGANISATION MONDIALE DU COMMERCE Accueil   |  L’OMC   |  Nouvelles et événements   |  Domaines   |  Membres de l’OMC   |  Documents et ressources   |  Relations extérieures Contactez-nous   |  Plan du site   |  A-Z   |  Recherche english     español accueil ressources recherche/analyse publications de l'omc rapport sur le commerce mondial 2010 article   RECHERCHE ET ANALYSE Boom-Bust Cycle, Asymmetrical Fiscal Response and the Dutch Disease Rabah Arezki : International Monetary Fund, IMF Institute Kareem Ismail : International Monetary Fund and Johns Hopkins University   (uniquement en anglais) Asymmetry in fiscal policy to resource-price shocks across different types of expenditure may have strong implications on competitiveness outside the resource sector. (...) First, we find that within-country variation in current spending have a stronger impact on the within-country variation in REER compared to capital spending. Second, we find that current spending is downwardly rigid, but increase in boom time and conversely for capital spending.
Language:English
Score: 851797.95 - https://www.wto.org/french/res...10_forum_f/wtr10_1june10_f.htm
Data Source: un
UNICEF uses evidence-based, affordable solutions to identify potential areas for flexibility in fiscal spending so that funds can be directed towards social spending without jeopardizing fiscal sustainability. 2. (...) These analyses can help in estimating the cost of closing the gaps in public spending for children, assessing the distributive effects of public policies and public spending, and improving the targeting of public resources. (...) Availability of good budget data is crucial to support budget planning, and to track how well policy commitments are being translated into direct action to benefit children and young people.
Language:English
Score: 851408.9 - https://www.unicef.org/sites/d...-for-Children-2-pager-2019.pdf
Data Source: un
SOCIAL POLICY_Folder.indd SOCIAL POLICY, RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION statistical system; ensuring adequate, effi cient, effective and equitable public spending for the benefi t of children and their families; and promoting the development of a comprehensive and integrated social To ensure the best future for Tanzania’s children, UNICEF focuses on generating knowledge on the situation of women and children in Tanzania for evidence- based advocacy and planning, including strengthening the national protection system to reduce poverty and vulnerability. (...) © U N IC E F Ta nz an ia / 2 01 6 /G ia co m o P iro zz i What we want to achieve by 2021 Reduced child poverty in Tanzania at national and sub-national levels through quality, evidence-based policies, programmes and budgets designed for all children, especially the most marginalized. Some of the key planned results are:  High-quality strategic research and analysis on child poverty available and utilized for evidence-based planning and budgeting.  Measurement and reporting on child poverty institutionalized within government.  National and sub-national statistical systems strengthened to collect and analyse data on the rights of children, including robust Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP II) and SDG monitoring.  The needs and rights of children, particularly the most vulnerable, prioritized in national and sub-national policies and plans.  Increased public resources for children leveraged, quality of spending regularly monitored, and innovative fi nancing mechanisms for children’s well-being put in place.  Inequities in public policy, budget formulation and implementation processes better understood, and strategies for addressing them identifi ed and implemented.  Children able to access a comprehensive and integrated social protection system that is increasingly funded by domestic resources. © U N IC E F Ta nz an ia / 2 01 6 /G ia co m o P iro zz i 3 in 10 children live in income poverty More than 7 in 10 of all children live in multidimensional poverty (deprivation in three or more dimensions) 40% of children in urban areas Almost 1 in 10 children live in extreme poverty Income poverty declined by 70% in Dar es Salaam but only by 15% in rural areas Water Sanitation Education Nutrition Protection Access to information Housing Health Indicators of multidimensional poverty Source: World Bank, 2012.; Tanzania National Bureau of Statistics, 2016; UNICEF, Child Poverty in Tanzania, 2016. 81% of children in rural areas Income poverty decline is uneven Cover photo: © UNICEF Tanzania/ 2016 /Giacomo Pirozzi What is the situation? (...) The distribution of public spending tends to favour the better-served areas in the country and often reinforces existing disparities.
Language:English
Score: 851018.5 - https://www.unicef.org/tanzani...7-Social-Policy-Fact-sheet.pdf
Data Source: un
La política fiscal debe jugar un papel central en la mitigación del impacto social y económico derivado de la pandemia del COVID-19, así como contribuir a impulsar la reactivación económica | Press Release | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Press Releases » Fiscal Policy Must Play a Central Role in Mitigating the Social and Economic Impact Arising from the COVID-19 Pandemic, While Also Contributing to Propelling the Economic Reactivation Available in: English Español Fiscal Policy Must Play a Central Role in Mitigating the Social and Economic Impact Arising from the COVID-19 Pandemic, While Also Contributing to Propelling the Economic Reactivation ECLAC launched its annual report, Fiscal Panorama of Latin America and the Caribbean 2020, in which it analyzes the region’s countries’ fiscal response to the human and economic crisis prompted by the coronavirus disease. 6 July 2020 | Press Release Economic development in_aviso.jpg Fiscal policy must play a central role in mitigating the social and economic impact arising from the COVID-19 pandemic while at the same time providing the needed impetus to achieve a reactivation of economic activity that would help steer the region towards sustainable and inclusive development in a post COVID-19 world. (...) As the report explains in detail, these packages include measures on public spending, tax relief and liquidity support backed by governments in the region. (...) During that period, public spending growth in Latin America was due to greater outlays for financing social policies.
Language:English
Score: 850827.3 - https://www.cepal.org/en/press...al-and-economic-impact-arising
Data Source: un