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Burkina Faso will also develop and implement a plan for human resources for health and construct a new public and private school for midwives by 2015. (...) Niger commits to increase health spending from 8.1% to 15% by 2015, with free care for maternal and child heath, including obstetric complications management and family planning. (...) Niger will reduce the fertility rate from 3.3% to 2.5% through training 1500 providers of family planning, and creating 2120 new contraception distribution sites.
Language:English
Score: 849258.8 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/20101015_pmnch_apha_pr.pdf
Data Source: un
Governments provide an average of 51% of a country’s health spending, while more than 35% of health spending per country comes from out-of-pocket expenses. (...) But government spending only reduces inequities in access when allocations are carefully planned to ensure that the entire population can obtain primary health care. In low- and middle-income countries, new data suggest that more than half of health spending is devoted to primary health care. Yet less than 40% of all spending on primary health care comes from governments.
Language:English
Score: 848838 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...-much-out-of-their-own-pockets
Data Source: un
Worldwide, governments provide an average of 51 per cent of a country’s health spending, while more than 35 per cent of health spending per country comes from out-of-pocket expenses. (...) But government spending only reduces inequities in access when allocations are carefully planned to ensure that the entire population can obtain primary health care, the UN agency said. (...) “Now they need to act on that declaration and prioritize spending on quality healthcare in the community,” she added.
Language:English
Score: 847749.2 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2019/02/1033191
Data Source: un
Building on the Member State pledge to Protect Our Children, initiated by the EU, GRULAC and Members of the Group of Friends of Children and the SDGs, a proposed Six Point Plan to Protect our Children includes urgent action to prevent, mitigate and respond to the worst effects of the pandemic as it continues to spread around the globe. (...) It aims to bring the world back together around a common cause: the health and wellbeing of current and future generations and the full realization of the SDGs and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. A proposed Six-Point Plan to Protect Our Children In all the below six points, decision makers must prioritize one critical step: listening to children and young people and including them in decision-making. (...) Adopt principles of results-based reporting to spending on children, adolescents, and youth, with a particular focus on equity and effectiveness, including gender equity.
Language:English
Score: 847387.9 - https://www.unicef.org/media/105251/file
Data Source: un
Needs more organized institutional arrangement in measuring the Indonesian ICT – Many irregular available data, lack of up-to-date data – Codification/classification of data : Classification change/concordance 3. Data on government spending : difficulties in capturing ICT spending in non-ICT activities (ICT as supporting activities) 4. (...) Thamrin 8, Jakarta 10340 Telp. (021)-3169813 Fax. (021)-3169811 E-mail: tikometer@inn.bppt.go.id Terimakasih dan Selamat Berdiskusi SUPPLEMENT SLIDES WSIS Plan of Action (WSIS Plan of Action (paragraphparagraph 28)28) “A realistic international performance evaluation and benchmarking (both qualitative and quantitative), through comparable statistical indicators and research results, should be developed to follow up the implementation of the objectives, goals and targets in the Plan of Action …” “All countries and regions should develop tools so as to provide statistical information on the Information Society, with basic indicators and analysis of its key dimensions. Priority should be given to setting up coherent and internationally comparable indicator systems, taking into account different levels of development.” WSIS PLAN OF ACTION WSIS WSIS ThematicThematic Meeting: Meeting: MeasuringMeasuring the Information Societythe Information Society Geneva, 7Geneva, 7--9 9 FebruaryFebruary 20052005 270 participants 270 participants fromfrom 85 countries85 countries Agenda: - Global ICT indicators stocktaking results - Core list of ICT indicators and methodological issues - Capacity building needs of NSOs in developing countries - ICT impact indicators and MDGs – benchmarking and monitoring Key outcome: adoption of core list of indicators CoreCore listlist of ICT of ICT indicatorsindicators 421932Total 44ICT sector 1248ICT access and usage by businesses 141310ICT access and usage by households and individuals 12210ICT infrastructure and access TotalReferenceExtended coreBasic coreSet of indicators Examples of Data Collected • Number of telephone subscribers (wireline & wireless, local & national/cellular) • Telephone subscribers composition • Cellular phone payment scheme composition • Telephone capacity • International phone traffics • Number of internet users & subscribers • Number of PC’s, internet hosts and ISPs • Internet usage • Domain .id • Number of households with radio and TV • Number of radio and TV stations • Foreign investment s on ICT industry (manufacture & service) • Local investment on ICT industry (manufacture & service) • Central government budgets & realization on ICT related activities/programs • Export/import values/volumes of ICT goods/commodity (data processing, telecommunication inc. audio/video, electronics component) • Number of applications for ICT related patent • Number of ICT copy rights (source code/application programs) • Number of institutions for high education (state/private owned) • Number of ICT education programs • Number of students and lecturer • … and more …
Language:English
Score: 846937.8 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/ict/...Experience%20-%20TIKoMeter.pdf
Data Source: un
New Database on Social Investment in Latin America and the Caribbean is Now Available | News | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » News » Ya está disponible nueva Base de datos de inversión social en América Latina y el Caribe Available in: English Español Português New Database on Social Investment in Latin America and the Caribbean is Now Available The tool was developed by ECLAC in collaboration with countries of the region. 14 June 2017 | News Social development banner_dds_base_dato_inversion_social_2017_en.jpg A new Database on Social Investment in Latin America and the Caribbean is available to all users interested in discovering the volume of resources spent on policies related to six functions: social protection; education; health; housing and community services; recreation, culture and religion; and environmental protection. (...) Nonetheless, social spending budgets in 2016-2017 show contractions in the majority of countries, prompting ECLAC to call for safeguarding the financing of social policies. (...) You might be interested in Press Release Extreme Poverty in the Region Rises to 86 Million in 2021 due to the Deepening of the Social and Health Crisis Prompted by the COVID-19 Pandemic News ECLAC Will Release the Latest Poverty and Inequality Figures in the Context of the Prolonged Health and Social Crisis Linked to COVID-19 Video Launch of flagship report Social Panorama of Latin America 2020 Extrabudgetary (XB) Fortalecimiento de la institucionalidad para una protección social universal y sostenible Links ECLAC Notes Nº 92 Topics Social investment/spending Social policies and programmes Related Content Publication Social Panorama of Latin America 2016 Press Release ECLAC: High Levels of Inequality in Latin America Constitute an Obstacle to Sustainable Development Regional Conference on Social Development in Latin America and the Caribbean Social Investment Portal in Latin America and the Caribbean Contact Public Information Unit Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) prensa@cepal.org (56 2) 2210 2040 Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 846837.9 - https://www.cepal.org/en/notic...n-social-america-latina-caribe
Data Source: un
DISTRIBUTIONAL ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC EDUCATION EXPENDITURE – KEY FINDINGS Distribution of public spending  Based on access, public spending on primary appears pro-poor, public spending on secondary appears broadly equal, and public spending on higher education has no direct benefit to the poor. (...) This includes training and capacity building for better management.  Strengthen relevant plans to inform priority actions for improving quality  Update and implement the National Human Resources Development Plan (short, medium and longer term actions)  Develop and implement standardized “Norms and Standards” for all types of health facilities at all levels FINANCING AND GOVERNANCE OF THE HEALTH SECTOR - KEY FINDINGS Level of public spending to health  Madagascar spends now less on health than three quarters of the SSA countries. (...) Executing better  Existing budgeting tools needs to be strengthened particularly the SIGFP especially with regards to including more comprehensive data on external aid, better tracking of investments and precise analysis of trends in execution rates across different programs.  De-concentration of resources to lower levels of management and service delivery should be considered with more autonomy on execution of at least some of the non-wage budget at district and primary care levels  Execution of regulation rates should be revisited with a specific focus on having a more equal impact across programs consistent with a prioritized budget execution strategy by the MOH.  The impending validation of the New Health Sector Strategy should be seen as a critical opportunity by Government to better harmonize financing to the sector under one national plan.  More harmonized and dynamic budgeting mechanisms should be put in place including with partners and donors and alignment of budget planning processes with calendar of the Ministry of Finance and Budget.
Language:English
Score: 846708.6 - https://www.unicef.org/esa/sit...car-Policy-Note-%282016%29.pdf
Data Source: un
Social Panorama of Latin America 2012 | Publication | Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Skip to main content United Nations Español English Português About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Menu Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Home Work areas 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events Search About ECLAC Executive Secretary Headquarters and offices Library CEPAL Review ES EN PT You are here Home » Publications » Social Panorama of Latin America 2012 Available in: English Español Português Social Panorama of Latin America 2012 March 2013 | Flagships » Social Panorama of Latin America Social development Gender affairs Corporate author: NU. (...) Some aspects of care in Latin America and the Caribbean: employment, household expenditure and persons with disabilities .-- Chapter III: Employment in the care sector in Latin America .-- Chapter IV: Recent trends in social spending and a profile of private spending on care in the region .-- Chapter V: Autonomy and independence: caring for persons with disabilities .-- Chapter VI: Care policies: situation and challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean. View bibliographical record in the Digital Repository You might be interested in Social Panorama of Latin America 2013 Social Panorama of Latin America 2015 Social Panorama of Latin America 2009 Social Panorama of Latin America 2017 Search publications See publications list Ebooks Amazon Barnes and Noble Itunes Topics Social rights Social investment/spending Poverty Care economy Related Content News Report Urges Region to Incorporate International Guidelines to Measure Disabilities Subscription Get ECLAC updates by email Subscribe Work areas Gender affairs International trade and integration Economic development Production, productivity and management Social development Sustainable development and human settlements Statistics Planning for development (ILPES) Population and development Natural resources Follow us on Cooperation Publications Data and statistics Training Press Centre Events ECLAC Library Digital Repository About ECLAC Member states Subsidiary bodies ECLAC senior staff Employment opportunities Procurement ECLAC Headquarters Av.
Language:English
Score: 844066.8 - https://www.cepal.org/en/publi...al-panorama-latin-america-2012
Data Source: un
Transferable Tax Credit : o Per-job based, $12,500 transferable tax credit for the first 6,000 new jobs created, totaling $75 million. o Another tax credit totaling $120 million combining 5-percent of the first $1 billion investment and 2.8-percent of the next $2.5 billion investment. 13 25 The Tesla Investment and Operational Plan: Facility construction: $1.0 billion in first 3 years Equipment investment: $3.95 billion over 2015-2018 Manufacturing job up to 6,500 by 2018 Substantial power consumption to generate utility fees to the host county. 3. (...) Overlooked the additional cost that government must pay to accommodate the substantial population increase if the Tesla plan and the government estimate of job growth (22,700) and population increase (49,000) are both true. (...) In contrast, The Nevada Study, by taking Tesla’s plan as given with no conscience on the government’s debt-laden budget, casually presented a rosy picture for the economic and revenue impact of its TIP. 17 4.
Language:English
Score: 843959.8 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-..._Presentation-Studies-Chen.pdf
Data Source: un
PowerPoint Presentation © UNICEF/Lister Supply Chain of Nutrition Products Upstream and Downstream Ryan McWhorter – Supply Chain Strengthening Center Gemma Orta-Martinez – Monitoring, Strategic Data and Evidence Unit Marcia Attaran – Procurement Services Center Nutrition Supply Forum UNICEF Supply Division, Copenhagen 5-6 November 2019 Operations: The activities and processes along a supply chain, including upstream, midstream, and downstream operations Enablers: The fundamentals needed to manage and run the supply chain effectively Human Resources Data for Management System Design & Practice Financing and Resource Mobilization Policies and Regulatory Frameworks SUPPLY CHAIN RAINBOW Human Resources Data Management System Design & Practice Financing and Resource Mobilization Policies and Regulatory Frameworks Definition of Need Definition of need and demand forecast: country forecast is at the base of UNICEF’s forecast – and internal intelligence is then layered on to it Country data collection via local data systems National level data & quantification process, including UNICEF & partner input in NutriDash Government approved country forecast Submission by CO to UNICEF SD, via NutriDash Global intelligence layered on country data UNICEF Global Forecast: (i) shared with industry, (ii) used to manage & disaggregate demand for planning But: Our context is dynamic and requires that we have a process to manage changes to the forecast Country data collection via local data systems National level data & quantification process, including UNICEF & partner input Government approved country forecast Submission by CO to UNICEF SD Global intelligence layered on country data UNICEF Global Forecast: (i) shared with industry, (ii) used to manage & disaggregate demand for planning Current ecosystem gives UNICEF potential to play key role in country to support quantification, e.g. by improving visibility Human Resources Data Management System Design & Practice Financing and Resource Mobilization Policies and Regulatory Frameworks Budgeting & Planning – UNICEF for every child7 Budgeting Nutrition Planning Data Collection Forecasting Supply Plan Supply budgeting Needs Assessment Nutrition planning and financing must be considered as a part of the broader budgeting process – UNICEF for every childBudgeting8 Supply Financing support towards self-Financing sustainability • Efficient Public Financial management systems (PFM) Timely collection of revenues and disbursement of funds in full so activities are carried out as planned (expenditures are incurred) • Reporting to ensure accountability, Efficiency and equity in spending decisions Funding flows are tracked and linked to expenditures (which helps in identify overspending, under-spending and savings) through monthly/quarterly/yearly reporting • Multi-year budget based on realistic costing The result of a costing process reflecting e.g. co-financing obligations, new interventions, operational costs. (...) Once approved, line ministries (example: health) determine spending priorities. (cMYP, MTEF) • Clear fiscal picture and realistic spending levels Level of overall expenditure given policy goals, expected revenues, level of national deficit. (...) Supply Chain Maturity Model Initial analysis completed, gaps identified 1 2 3 4 5 Su p p ly c h ai n p e rf o rm an ce High Low Supply chain maturity High Processes are ad hoc, reactive Improvement plan developed, initial changes implemented but not consistent or sustainable Changes are sustained, strategy is implemented and progress regularly monitored Improvements fully integrated into long-term plans and embedded into larger processes; continuous improvement Human Resources Data for Management System Design & Practice Financing and Resource Mobilization Policies and Regulatory Frameworks SUPPLY CHAIN RAINBOW
Language:English
Score: 843397 - https://www.unicef.org/supply/...pply-Rainbow-for-Nutrition.pdf
Data Source: un