Home

Results 1 - 10 of 30 for stingrays. Search took 1.294 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, CIVIL, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO DEVELOPMENT :WRITTEN STATEMENT / SUBMITTED BY AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION, CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS LEGALES Y SOCIALES (CELS) ASOCIACIÓN CIVIL, LEGAL RESOURCES CENTRE
In the United States, the ACLU investigation into Florida police use of IMSI catchers did not produce any policies or guidelines governing the use of stingrays or restricting how and when they could be deployed, suggesting a lack of internal oversight.20 Often described as ‘stingrays’ or ‘grabbers’, IMSI catchers are a class of surveillance devices that provide active online interception capabilities.21 The ACLU did discover that the state has a troubling history when it comes to stingrays: according to a document available online but not among the records provided to the ACLU, the Miami-Dade Police Department first purchased a cell site simulator in 2003 to surveil protesters at a Free Trade Area of the Americas conference.22 In South Africa, the LRC describes media reports with on and off-record comments by police sources strongly suggesting that government agencies have bought and used IMSI technology themselves, potentially against student protesters in the #feesmustfall movement.23 The Agora International Human Rights Group (Agora, Russia); the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI); the Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA); Dejusticia (Colombia); the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR); the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union (HCLU,); the Irish Council for Civil Liberties (ICCL); the Kenya Human Rights Commission (KHRC); the Legal Resources Centre (LRC, South Africa); and Liberty (United Kingdom), NGOs without consultative status, also share the views expressed in this statement. 19 For example, on 20 January 2019 a public prosecutor came to the informal meeting of ‘Open Russia’ activists at the city café in Cheboksary and handed the subpoena to Yuriy Sidorov. (...) story_fbid=2263701970584620&id=100008345174557 20 ACLU, ‘ACLU-Obtained Documents Reveal Breadth of Secretive Stingray Use in Florida’ (22 February 2015) available at: https://www.aclu.org/blog/free-future/aclu-obtained-documents-reveal- breadth-secretive-stingray-use-florida 21 Citizenlab definition (and discussion of the problem in Canada): a class of surveillance devices called ‘cell site simulators’, and which are commonly referred to as ‘IMSI Catchers’, ‘Digital Analyzers’, ‘cell grabbers’, and ‘mobile device identifiers’ or by brand names such as ‘Stingray’, DRTBOX and ‘Hailstorm’.
Language:English
Score: 1868613.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=A/HRC/41/NGO/148&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
On a recent Saturday afternoon he was fresh from taking SCUBA enthusiasts into the emerald waters of a location known as the Cathedral, where they were greeted by “a beautiful eagle ray” along with barracudas and stingrays.  “We here have been fairly lucky that the quality of the reefs has just about remained the same, but the challenges that we are getting now here in the environment is with this whole concept of global warming,” he said. (...) Surf instructor Jonathan Torry (right) spends practically every day at Las Cuevas Beach on the north coast of Trinidad. He has seen stingrays, manta rays and a pod of dolphins while out surfing.
Language:English
Score: 1300210 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2...rt-trinidad-and-tobago-culture
Data Source: un
ARCHITECTURAL DIRECTIONS AT STATISTICS NETHERLANDS : INVITED PAPER / SUBMITTED BY STATISTICS NETHERLANDS
Aside from a number of pure technical components, like the Stingray grid, the emphasis here lies on the somewhat bigger statistical functions like Bascula, a weighting component or Slice, a set of data editing components, etc.
Language:English
Score: 1271056.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...t?open&DS=CES/SEM.47/18&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
THE PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE CONTEXT OF PEACEFUL PROTESTS :DRAFT RESOLUTION / ALBANIA, AUSTRIA, BELGIUM, BULGARIA, COSTA RICA, CROATIA, CZECHIA, DENMARK, ESTONIA, FINLAND, FRANCE, ICELAND, LATVIA, LIECHTENSTEIN, LITHUANIA, LUXEMBOURG, MALTA, MONTENEGRO, NETHERLANDS, NORTH MACEDONIA, NORWAY, PERU, PORTUGAL, ROMANIA, SLOVENIA, SPAIN, SWEDEN, SWITZERLAND, TUNISIA, UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND AND URUGUAY
.: Limited 13 July 2020 Original: English A/HRC/44/L.11 2 Recalling also its resolution 43/1 of 19 June 2020 on the promotion and protection of the human rights and fundamental freedoms of Africans and of people of African descent against excessive use of force and other human rights violations by law enforcement officers, Recognizing that, pursuant to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association are human rights guaranteed to all, while their exercise may be subject to certain restrictions, in accordance with States’ obligations under applicable international human rights instruments, Recognizing also that any such restrictions must be based in law, and be necessary and proportionate to further a legitimate aim, in accordance with the State’s obligations under applicable international human rights instruments, and that, if imposed, administrative or judicial review that is prompt, competent, independent and impartial should be available, Reaffirming that the adoption of emergency measures taken by Governments in response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic must be necessary, proportionate to the evaluated risk and applied in a non-discriminatory way, have a specific focus and duration, and be in accordance with the State’s obligations under applicable international human rights law, Recalling that States have the primary responsibility for the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms, including in the context of assemblies such as peaceful protests, and to ensure that national legislation, policies and practices, as the national framework for the exercise of the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, are in compliance with international human rights law, Noting that the proper management of assemblies involves and can have an impact on respect for human rights before, during and after an assembly, and aims to contribute to its peaceful conduct and to prevent injuries to and loss of life of protesters, those monitoring such protests, bystanders and officials exercising law enforcement duties, Acknowledging that peaceful protests may occur in all societies, including protests that are spontaneous, simultaneous, unauthorized or restricted, Acknowledging also that participation in peaceful protests can be an important form of exercising the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression, of association and of participation in the conduct of public affairs, Recognizing that peaceful protests can make a positive contribution to the development, strengthening and effectiveness of democratic systems and to democratic processes, including elections and referendums, Recognizing also that peaceful protests have historically played a constructive social and political role in the development of more just and accountable societies, and that such protests can continue to make a positive contribution to human development and to the full enjoyment of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, Reaffirming that everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person, Reaffirming also that participation in public and peaceful protests should be entirely voluntary and uncoerced, Recalling that the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association include organizing, participating in, observing, monitoring and recording assemblies, Stressing therefore that everyone, including persons espousing minority or dissenting views or beliefs, must be able to express their grievances or aspirations in a peaceful manner, including through public protests, without fear of reprisal or of being intimidated, harassed, injured, sexually assaulted, beaten, arbitrarily arrested or detained, tortured, killed or subjected to enforced disappearance, or subjected to abusive criminal or civil proceedings, Deeply concerned about extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, arbitrary arrests and detention, enforced disappearances, and torture and other cruel, inhuman or A/HRC/44/L.11 3 degrading treatment or punishment of persons exercising their rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association in all regions of the world, Deeply concerned also about misinformation, disinformation and undue restrictions preventing or impairing an individual’s ability to have access to or disseminate information, inter alia, at key political moments, with an impact on the ability to organize and conduct assemblies, Noting that the possibility of using communications technology securely and privately, in accordance with international human rights law, is important for the organization and conduct of assemblies, Noting also that, although an assembly has generally been understood as a physical gathering of people, human rights protections, including for the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, also apply to analogous interactions taking place online, Acknowledging that new technologies can be enablers for the exercise of the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression, of association and of participation in the conduct of public affairs by facilitating mobilization for and the organization of assemblies, and acknowledging also that they create space for the holding of assemblies online and may facilitate and enhance the involvement and participation of those often marginalized, as well as support the proper management of assemblies and increase transparency and accountability, Expressing its concern at the criminalization, in all parts of the world, of individuals and groups solely for having organized or taken part in peaceful protests or for having observed, monitored or recorded protests, and at the designation of such individuals as threats to national security, whether in legislation or policy, Expressing its concern also at the unlawful or arbitrary surveillance, both in physical spaces and online, of individuals engaged in peaceful protests, including through the use of new and emerging digital tracking tools such as facial recognition, international mobile subscriber identity-catchers (“stingrays”) and closed-circuit television, Emphasizing that technical solutions to secure and to protect the confidentiality of digital communications, including measures for encryption, pseudonymization and anonymity online, can be important to ensure the enjoyment of human rights, in particular the rights to privacy, to freedom of expression, and to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, Stressing that peaceful protests should not be viewed as a threat, and therefore encouraging all States to engage in an open, inclusive and meaningful dialogue when dealing with peaceful protests and their causes, Recalling that isolated acts of violence committed by others in the course of a protest do not deprive peaceful individuals of their rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, Bearing in mind that assemblies can be facilitated on the basis of communication and collaboration among organizers, protesters, local authorities and officials exercising law enforcement duties, Recognizing that national human rights institutions and representatives of civil society, including non-governmental organizations, can play a useful role in facilitating continued dialogue between individuals taking part in peaceful protests and the relevant authorities, Stressing the need to ensure full accountability for human rights violations or abuses in the context of protests, including by investigating such violations and abuses and prosecuting the perpetrators, Recalling the Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials, the Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials and the Minnesota Protocol on the Investigation of Potentially Unlawful Death (2016), A/HRC/44/L.11 4 Noting the United Nations Human Rights Guidance on Less-Lethal Weapons in Law Enforcement issued by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights as a supplement to the Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials, and calling upon all States to consider applying it to their law enforcement operations in relation to assemblies, Encouraging all States to make appropriate use of the Resource Book on the Use of Force and Firearms in Law Enforcement published by the Office of the High Commissioner and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and the updated training package of the Office of the High Commissioner on human rights law and law enforcement, Recalling the importance of adequate training, equipment, oversight and accountability for officials and private personnel exercising law enforcement duties assigned to the management of assemblies, and of refraining, to the extent feasible, from assigning military personnel to perform such duties, while reaffirming that international obligations and commitments in relation to the use of force in the context of law enforcement also apply to the military when it is performing law enforcement duties, and that private personnel should respect internationally recognized standards, Taking note with appreciation of the guidance provided by the Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association in the context of the COVID- 19 pandemic,1 Underlining that considerations such as the health risks posed by the COVID-19 pandemic should not be used to restrict human rights and fundamental freedoms, such as the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, in an unnecessary or disproportionate manner, and that any restriction of human rights guaranteed by international instruments must fulfil the strict requirements laid down in those instruments, 1.
Language:English
Score: 1162681.5 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=A/HRC/44/L.11&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
THE PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE CONTEXT OF PEACEFUL PROTESTS :RESOLUTION / ADOPTED BY THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL ON 17 JULY 2020
.: General 23 July 2020 Original: English A/HRC/RES/44/20 2 exercise may be subject to certain restrictions, in accordance with States’ obligations under applicable international human rights instruments, Recognizing also that any such restrictions must be based in law, and be necessary and proportionate to further a legitimate aim, in accordance with the State’s obligations under applicable international human rights instruments, and that, if imposed, administrative or judicial review that is prompt, competent, independent and impartial should be available, Reaffirming that emergency measures taken by Governments in response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic must be necessary, proportionate to the evaluated risk and applied in a non-discriminatory way, have a specific focus and duration, and be in accordance with the State’s obligations under applicable international human rights law, Recalling that States have the primary responsibility for the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms, including in the context of assemblies such as peaceful protests, and to ensure that national legislation, policies and practices, as the national framework for the exercise of the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, are in compliance with their international human rights obligations and commitments, Noting that the proper management of assemblies involves and can have an impact on respect for human rights before, during and after an assembly, and aims to contribute to its peaceful conduct and to prevent injuries to and loss of life of those participating in and monitoring such protests, and bystanders and officials exercising law enforcement duties, Acknowledging that peaceful protests may occur in all societies, including protests that are spontaneous, simultaneous, unauthorized or restricted, Acknowledging also that participation in peaceful protests can be an important form of exercising the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression, of association and of participation in the conduct of public affairs, Recognizing that peaceful protests can make a positive contribution to the development, strengthening and effectiveness of democratic systems and to democratic processes, including elections and referendums, Recognizing also that peaceful protests have historically played a constructive social and political role in the development of more just and accountable societies, and that such protests can continue to make a positive contribution to human development and to the full enjoyment of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, Reaffirming that everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person, Reaffirming also that participation in public and peaceful protests should be entirely voluntary and uncoerced, Recalling that the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association include organizing, participating in, observing, monitoring and recording assemblies, Stressing therefore that everyone, including persons espousing minority or dissenting views or beliefs, must be able to express their grievances or aspirations in a peaceful manner, including through public protests, without fear of reprisal or of being intimidated, harassed, injured, sexually assaulted, beaten, arbitrarily arrested or detained, tortured, killed or subjected to enforced disappearance, or subjected to abusive criminal or civil proceedings, Deeply concerned about extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, arbitrary arrests and detention, enforced disappearances, and torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment of persons exercising their rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association in all regions of the world, Deeply concerned also about misinformation, disinformation, misuse of new technologies and undue restrictions preventing or impairing an individual’s ability to have access to or disseminate information, inter alia, at key political moments, with an impact on the ability to organize and conduct assemblies, A/HRC/RES/44/20 3 Noting that the possibility of using communications technology securely and privately, in accordance with international human rights law, is important for the organization and conduct of assemblies, Noting also that, although an assembly has generally been understood as a physical gathering of people, human rights protections, including for the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, also apply to analogous interactions taking place online, Acknowledging that new technologies can be enablers for the exercise of the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression, of association and of participation in the conduct of public affairs by facilitating mobilization for and the organization of assemblies, and acknowledging also that they create space for the holding of assemblies online and may facilitate and enhance the involvement and participation of those often marginalized, as well as support the proper management of assemblies and increase transparency and accountability, Expressing its concern at the criminalization, in all parts of the world, of individuals and groups solely for having organized or taken part in peaceful protests or for having observed, monitored or recorded protests, and at the designation of such individuals as threats to national security, whether in legislation or policy, Expressing its concern also at the unlawful or arbitrary surveillance, both in physical spaces and online, of individuals engaged in peaceful protests, including through the use of new and emerging digital tracking tools, such as facial recognition, international mobile subscriber identity-catchers (“stingrays”) and closed-circuit television, Emphasizing that technical solutions to secure and to protect the confidentiality of digital communications, including measures for encryption, pseudonymization and anonymity online, can be important to ensure the enjoyment of human rights, in particular the rights to privacy, to freedom of expression, and to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, Stressing that peaceful protests should not be viewed as a threat, and therefore encouraging all States to engage in an open, inclusive and meaningful dialogue when dealing with peaceful protests and their causes, Recalling that isolated acts of violence committed by others in the course of a protest do not deprive peaceful individuals of their rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, Bearing in mind that the peaceful conduct of assemblies can be facilitated on the basis of communication and collaboration among organizers, protesters, local authorities and officials exercising law enforcement duties, Recognizing that national human rights institutions and representatives of civil society, including non-governmental organizations, can play a useful role in facilitating continued dialogue between individuals taking part in peaceful protests and the relevant authorities, Stressing the need to ensure full accountability for human rights violations or abuses in the context of protests, including by investigating such violations and abuses and prosecuting the perpetrators, Recalling the Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials and the Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials, and noting the Minnesota Protocol on the Investigation of Potentially Unlawful Death (2016), Noting the United Nations Human Rights Guidance on Less-Lethal Weapons in Law Enforcement issued by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights as a supplement to the Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials, and calling upon all States to consider applying it to their law enforcement operations in relation to assemblies, Encouraging all States to make appropriate use of the Resource Book on the Use of Force and Firearms in Law Enforcement published by the Office of the High Commissioner A/HRC/RES/44/20 4 and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and the updated training package of the Office of the High Commissioner on human rights law and law enforcement, Recalling the importance of adequate training, equipment, oversight and accountability for officials and private personnel exercising law enforcement duties assigned to the management of assemblies, and of refraining, to the extent feasible, from assigning military personnel to perform such duties, while reaffirming that the State’s international obligations and commitments in relation to the use of force in the context of law enforcement also apply to the military when it is performing law enforcement duties, and that private personnel should respect internationally recognized standards, Recognizing the critical role that law enforcement plays in respecting and protecting human dignity and maintaining and upholding the human rights of all persons, including in the facilitation of assemblies, Taking note with appreciation of the guidance provided by the Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association in the context of the COVID- 19 pandemic,1 Underlining that considerations such as the health risks posed by the COVID-19 pandemic should not be used to restrict human rights and fundamental freedoms, such as the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, in an unnecessary or disproportionate manner, and that any restriction of human rights guaranteed by international instruments must fulfil the strict requirements laid down in those instruments, 1.
Language:English
Score: 1162681.5 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...open&DS=A/HRC/RES/44/20&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
THE PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE CONTEXT OF PEACEFUL PROTESTS :DRAFT RESOLUTION / ANDORRA, AUSTRALIA, AUSTRIA, BELGIUM, BULGARIA, COSTA RICA, CROATIA, CYPRUS, CZECHIA, DENMARK, ECUADOR, ESTONIA, FINLAND, GERMANY, GREECE, ICELAND, IRELAND, LATVIA, LIECHTENSTEIN, LITHUANIA, LUXEMBOURG, MALTA, MARSHALL ISLANDS, MONTENEGRO, NETHERLANDS, NORWAY, PARAGUAY, PERU, POLAND, PORTUGAL, ROMANIA, SLOVAKIA, SLOVENIA, SWEDEN, SWITZERLAND, TUNISIA, URUGUAY AND STATE OF PALESTINE
.: Limited 30 June 2022 Original: English A/HRC/50/L.16 2 exercise may be subject to certain restrictions, in accordance with States’ obligations under applicable international human rights instruments, Recognizing also that any such restrictions must be based in law, and be necessary and proportionate to further a legitimate aim, in accordance with the State’s obligations under applicable international human rights instruments, and that, if imposed, administrative or judicial review that is prompt, competent, independent and impartial should be available, Reaffirming that emergency measures taken by Governments must be necessary, proportionate to the evaluated risk and applied in a non-discriminatory way, have a specific focus and duration, and be in accordance with the State’s obligations under applicable international human rights law, Recalling that States have the primary responsibility for the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms, including in the context of assemblies such as peaceful protests, and to ensure that national legislation, policies and practices, as the national framework for the exercise of the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, are in compliance with their international human rights obligations and commitments, Mindful of the work undertaken by the treaty bodies to address the promotion and protection of human rights in the context of assemblies, including peaceful protests, and noting in this regard Human Rights Committee general comments No. 34 (2011) on freedoms of opinion and expression, No. 36 (2019) on the right to life and No. 37 (2020) on the right of peaceful assembly, Noting that the proper management of assemblies involves and can have an impact on respect for human rights before, during and after an assembly, and aims to contribute to its peaceful conduct and to prevent injuries to and loss of life of those participating in and monitoring such protests, and bystanders and officials exercising law enforcement duties, Acknowledging that peaceful protests may occur in all societies, including protests that are spontaneous, simultaneous, unauthorized or restricted, Acknowledging also that participation in peaceful protests can be an important form of exercising the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression, of association and of participation in the conduct of public affairs, Recognizing that peaceful protests can make a positive contribution to the development, strengthening and effectiveness of democratic systems and to democratic processes, including elections and referendums, as well as to the rule of law, Recognizing also that peaceful protests have historically played a constructive social and political role in the development of more just, equal and accountable societies, and that such protests can continue to make a positive contribution to human development and to the full enjoyment of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, Recognizing further that peaceful protests should be seen as public forums where individuals, communities and groups facing marginalization and discrimination can safely mobilize to voice their views and opinions and to claim their rights, Reaffirming that everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person, Reaffirming also that participation in public and peaceful protests should be entirely voluntary and uncoerced, Recalling that the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression, and of association and to take part in the conduct of public affairs include organizing, disseminating information about, participating in, observing, monitoring and recording assemblies, Stressing therefore that everyone, including persons espousing minority or dissenting views or beliefs, must be able to express their grievances or aspirations in a peaceful manner, including through public protests, without fear of reprisal or of being intimidated, harassed, injured, sexually assaulted, beaten, arbitrarily arrested or detained, tortured, killed or subjected to enforced disappearance, or subjected to abusive criminal or civil proceedings, A/HRC/50/L.1616 3 Deeply concerned about extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, arbitrary arrests and detention, enforced disappearances, torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment of, and violence, in particular sexual and gender-based violence, against persons exercising their rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association in all regions of the world, Expressing deep concern at the restrictions placed on and the targeting of journalists and other media workers, monitors, lawyers, other observers, such as human rights defenders, and medical personnel while they are engaging in their legitimate activities during protests, Acknowledging that women, children, indigenous peoples, migrants, persons of African descent, persons belonging to minorities, persons with disabilities and other persons belonging to groups who are discriminated against and marginalized are particularly vulnerable to unlawful police use of force while taking part in protests, Reaffirming that the full, meaningful and active participation of women and girls, on equal terms with men and boys, in public life is essential to the achievement of equality, sustainable development, peace and democracy, and that effective policies, public campaigns and educational programmes are necessary to combat discriminatory social norms, attitudes and harmful stereotypes about gender roles and capabilities that discourage involvement in public life and the exercise of the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of opinion and expression and of association, such as in peaceful protests, Deeply concerned about misinformation, disinformation, misuse of new technologies and undue restrictions preventing or impairing an individual’s ability to have access to or disseminate information, including partial or full Internet shutdowns, inter alia, at key political moments, with an impact on the ability to organize and conduct assemblies, Noting that the possibility of having access to and using communications technology securely and privately, in accordance with international human rights law, is important for the organization and conduct of assemblies, Noting also that, although an assembly has generally been understood as a physical gathering of people, the protections guaranteed by international human rights law, including for the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, also apply to analogous interactions taking place online, Noting further that online and digital spaces are particularly important where individuals face restrictions operating in physical spaces, Acknowledging that new technologies can be enablers for the exercise of the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression, of association and of participation in the conduct of public affairs by facilitating mobilization for and the organization of assemblies, and acknowledging also that they create space for the holding of assemblies online and may facilitate and enhance the involvement and participation of those often marginalized, as well as support the proper management of assemblies and increase transparency and accountability, Expressing its concern at the criminalization and prosecution, including through unfair trials or trials in military courts, in all parts of the world, of individuals and groups solely for having organized or taken part in peaceful protests, for having observed, monitored or recorded protests or for offering medical support to or defending the rights of protesters, and at the designation of such individuals as threats to national security, whether in legislation or policy, Expressing its concern also at the arbitrary and unlawful surveillance, both in physical spaces and online, of individuals engaged in peaceful protests, including through the use of closed-circuit television and aerial surveillance vehicles, as well as through the use of new and emerging digital tracking tools, such as biometric technologies, including facial and emotional recognition and international mobile subscriber identity-catchers (“stingrays”), Emphasizing that technical solutions to secure and to protect the confidentiality of digital communications, including measures for encryption, pseudonymization and anonymity online, are important to ensure the enjoyment of human rights, in particular the A/HRC/50/L.16 4 rights to privacy, to freedom of expression, and to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, Stressing that peaceful protests should not be viewed as a threat, and therefore calling upon all States to engage in an open, inclusive and meaningful dialogue when dealing with peaceful protests and their root causes, Recalling that isolated acts of violence committed by others in the course of a protest do not deprive peaceful individuals of their rights to freedom of peaceful assembly, of expression and of association, Bearing in mind that the peaceful conduct of assemblies can be facilitated on the basis of communication and collaboration among organizers, protesters, local authorities and officials exercising law enforcement duties, Recognizing that national human rights institutions and representatives of civil society, including non-governmental organizations, can play a useful role in facilitating continued dialogue among organizers, individuals taking part in peaceful protests and the relevant authorities, Stressing the need to ensure full accountability for human rights violations or abuses in the context of protests, including by investigating such violations and abuses and providing victims with access to an effective remedy and redress, Recalling the Code of Conduct for Law Enforcement Officials and the Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials, and noting the Minnesota Protocol on the Investigation of Potentially Unlawful Death (2016), Noting the United Nations Human Rights Guidance on Less-Lethal Weapons in Law Enforcement issued by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights as a supplement to the Basic Principles on the Use of Force and Firearms by Law Enforcement Officials, and calling upon all States to consider applying it to their law enforcement operations in relation to assemblies, Encouraging all States to make appropriate use of the Resource Book on the Use of Force and Firearms in Law Enforcement published by the Office of the High Commissioner and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and the updated training package of the Office of the High Commissioner on human rights law and law enforcement, Recalling the importance of adequate training, equipment, oversight and accountability for officials and private personnel exercising law enforcement duties assigned to the management of assemblies, and of refraining, to the extent feasible, from assigning military personnel or employing military equipment and techniques to perform such duties, while reaffirming that the State’s international obligations and commitments in relation to the use of force in the context of law enforcement also apply to the military when it is performing law enforcement duties, and that private personnel should respect internationally recognized standards, Reaffirming that, in situations of armed conflict, including military occupation, the use of force during peaceful protests remains regulated by the rules governing law enforcement under international human rights law and must comply with relevant international standards relating to the use of force and firearms by law enforcement officials, Recognizing the critical role that law enforcement plays in respecting and protecting human dignity and maintaining and upholding the human rights of all persons, including in the facilitation of assemblies, 1.
Language:English
Score: 1088437.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=A/HRC/50/L.16&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
On a recent Saturday afternoon he was fresh from taking SCUBA enthusiasts into the emerald waters of a location known as the Cathedral, where they were greeted by “a beautiful eagle ray” along with barracudas and stingrays. “We here have been fairly lucky that the quality of the reefs has just about remained the same, but the challenges that we are getting now here in the environment is with this whole concept of global warming,” he said.
Language:English
Score: 1024934.4 - https://www.un.org/sustainable...f-trinidad-and-tobago-culture/
Data Source: un
REPORT OF THE TECHNICAL WORKSHOPS AND MEETING TO SIGN THE MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING CONCERNING CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF DUGONGS (DUGONG DUGON) AND THEIR HABITATS THROUGHOUT THEIR RANGE
UNEP/CMS/DUGONG/Report Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals Distr: General 13 February 2008 Original: English Technical
Language:English
Score: 878069.2 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...=UNEP/CMS/DUGONG/REPORT&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
CAYMAN ISLANDS : WORKING PAPER / PREPARED BY THE SECRETARIAT
Amendments to the National Marine Conservation Law were passed in January 2007 to regulate water sports activities involving the interaction of divers and snorkellers with marine life.11 The bill designates the popular tourist attractions of Sandbar and Stingray City as Wildlife Interaction Zones. It also empowers fisheries officers to enforce control measures.
Language:English
Score: 866989.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...open&DS=A/AC.109/2007/2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
SURVEILLANCE AND HUMAN RIGHTS : REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF THE RIGHT TO FREEDOM OF OPINION AND EXPRESSION
Credible reporting suggests that the Government of China, using a combination of facial recognition technology and surveillance cameras throughout the country, “looks exclusively for Uighurs based on their appearance and keeps records of their comings and goings for search and review”.13 Much of the technology deployed by the Government appears to be produced domestically, by both State-owned and private enterprises.14 International Mobile Subscriber Identity catchers (Stingray) 13. International Mobile Subscriber Identity catchers mimic nearby cell towers to intercept communications and location data being transmitted by personal communication devices.
Language:English
Score: 664267.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/41/35&Lang=E
Data Source: ods