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sufficiently developed and comply such in relation to the varietal characteristics .> 3.2 CLASSIFICATION5 The {name of produce} are/is classified into three classes defined below: 3.2.1 “Extra” Class {Name of produce} in this class must be of superior quality. (...) The materials used inside the package must be of food-grade quality, clean, and of a quality such as to avoid causing any external or internal damage to the produce. (...) Quality Tolerances Tolerances allowed percentage of defective produce by count or weight Extra Class Class I Class II (a) Total Tolerance {name of produce} not satisfying the quality requirements 5 10 10 of which no more than {examples given below} Condition (Progressive) Defects Shriveling Unhealed bruises Mechanical damage Pest damage Quality (Non-Progressive) Defects Sunburn Misshapen Immature/not sufficiently developed [Decay, soft rot, internal breakdown 1 1 2] (b) Size Tolerances- off size from what is indicated/marked 10 10 10 (c) Produce belonging to other similar varieties than marked
Language:English
Score: 977129.3 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...ommittee/docs/INF_CCFFV_7e.pdf
Data Source: un
However, ubiquitous adoption within both the private and public sector in the future is likely to be dependent on a number of key developments: • Quality of data captured: The quality of the data captured by biometric technologies has to be appropriate to the intended use for that data. In the case of biometrics for identification activities for example, the data captured has to be sufficiently unique to distinguish it from all other profiles within a given ecosystem. However, for use in authentication, the data collected may only need to be sufficient enough to confirm a 1:1 match. Failure to meet an appropriate balance between quality and intended use has the potential to shape consumer opinion on the use of biometrics in the future and ultimately adoption of them. • Centralised or distributed: The decision of where the biometric data is held (see section ‎0) is influenced by use cases and risk, and privacy rules.
Language:English
Score: 973153.7 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...n/files/basic-html/page57.html
Data Source: un
Healthcare for animal Community has access to quality affordable animal health services whenever they need them. 14. Healthcare for human Community would have access to quality and affordable basic health care locally. 15. (...) Water for human The whole community would have access to sufficient, good quality water at all times of the year. 29.
Language:English
Score: 971489.1 - https://www.undp.org/sites/g/f...d/CoBRA-guidelines-v2-SD11.pdf
Data Source: un
PROVISIONS CONCERNING QUALITY The purpose of the standard is to define the quality requirements of sweet inshell almonds at the export control stage, after preparation and packaging. (...) Slight superficial defects of the shell and slight defects in shape or development may be allowed provided these do not affect the general appearance of the produce, the quality, keeping quality and presentation in the package. (...) Empty shell: almond shell containing no kernel (aborted kernel). Sufficiently developed: almond kernel of normal shape, without aborted or dried out portions; shrunken and shrivelled kernels are not sufficiently developed.
Language:English
Score: 967698.6 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA...ngs/ge.02/document/2001_08.pdf
Data Source: un
PowerPoint Presentation ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ Session 2: Deep dive on methodologies for DFS quality assessment ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ Q20/12 overall structure and overview Q20:Perceptual and field assessment principles for QoS and QoE of DFS. (...) P.1502 Reference to basics (see session 1) https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/studygroups/2009-2012/Pages/default.aspx https://www.itu.int/net/ITU-T/info/approval.aspx ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ First pilot (Ghana) DFS metrics and methodology evolution (1/3) 3 Automation/efficiency U s e c a s e s P2P, Single operator, national Handwritten lists/manual transfer G.1033, P.1502 Details: See slides G.1033 Overview and P.1502 Overview Deep past ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ First pilot (Ghana) Second pilot (3-country test 2020) DFS metrics and methodology evolution (2/3) 4 Automation/efficiency U s e c a s e s P2P, Single operator, national Handwritten lists/manual transfer P2P, Inter- operator/ intra- country P2P, Inter- operator, cross- country Multi-stopwatch G.1033, P.1502 FIGI Reports Recent past ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ Further work (SG12 Q20)First pilot (Ghana) Second pilot (3-country test 2020) DFS metrics and methodology evolution (3/3) 5 Automation/efficiency U s e c a s e s P2P, Single operator, national Handwritten lists/manual transfer P2P, Inter- operator/ intra- country P2P, Inter- operator, cross- country Mobile to fix, bulk transfers Multi-stopwatch Automation of DFS transfers G.1033, P.1502 FIGI Reports Evolve ITU-T Recommendations See slide P.Suppl_DFS and following See slide Q20 work item: P.DFSinter and following Future: New Recommendation today ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ G.1033: Quality of service and quality of experience aspects of digital financial services • This Recommendation highlights important aspects related to quality of service (QoS) and quality of experience (QoE) which shall be considered in the context of digital financial services (DFSs) – Use cases (P2P/B2P, National/Cross-country, Smartphone/ feature phone) – Legal entities (Case A, Case B) – Mobile network QoS (network availability, accessibility, service accessibility, integrity and retainability) and how high DFS reliability can be achieved – DFS stakeholders (end users, DFS operators, Regulators, Network operators) – QoS monitoring Concludes by urging stakeholders to share more information to improve the quality of standards development and testing- DFS. 6 ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ P.1502: Methodology for QoE testing of digital financial services With the understanding that QoS and quality of experience (QoE) of DFS relies on the QoS and proper functionality of mobile networks, respective quality metrics and testing methodologies need to be defined. • This Recommendation details the DFS testing methodology and connects to a field test using this methodology which has been conducted in Ghana. – Test scenarios (roles and entities, action flows, automation of tests) – Transaction model – End-to-end DFS KPIs (MTCR, MTCT, MTFTRR) – Acquisition of data on DFS Transactions (data collection models) – Background measurements and data validation and processing • Overall DFS performance is the result of two subsystems: Mobile network and DFS infrastructure – Both subsystems need to have good performance for overall good results – Poor performance in one system may be hard to detect if the other system does also not perform well (risk of “evasive finger pointing”) – Overall good quality can be achieved easier when respective regulators co-operate 7 ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ Q20 work item: P.Suppl_DFS → new ITU-T Supplement 8 "Considerations on automation of DFS testing“ Target date: 2022 Base text will be presented at the next SG12 meeting (June 2022) ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ Essence of P.Suppl_DFS • DFS measurement methodology involves a two-channel approach: Measuring mobile network performance, and measuring DFS end to end performance • Fully automated mobile network performance testing is a well-established art, 100% automation of the full chain is no problem • Automation of DFS testing is harder: – Platform devices in real use are often „feature phones“; DFS implementations are less accessible to external access (may require rather deep „hacks“); high degree of localization, making it harder to develop tools (devices may have to run in the same country); testing may trigger DFS-inherent security mechanisms; use case involves transfer of real money, i.e. developers have to „tread carefully“ 9 ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ Excerpt from considerations on DFS test automation • „Electronic“ control of activities on a device; alternatives – Full implementation of the DFS related processes in a testing environment – Using real devices and basic processes, and put a control layer on top of it • May need to work interactively, i.e. cannot just execute a sequence of commands/actions but needs to „read“ responses of the DFS system • „Mechanic“ control of activities, e.g. by physical actuators („robot finger“) – More generalized solution, but required hardware will drive cost – Will still need interactivity („read“ display to decide/time actions) 10 ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ Q20 work item: P.DFSinter → new ITU-T Recommendation 11 "Extended methodology for cross-country and inter-operator Digital Financial Services testing“ Target date: 2023 Updated base text will be presented at the next SG12 meeting (June 2022) ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ Essence of P.DFS_Inter • ITU-T Rec. (...) • Technology must be adequate – Sufficient penetration of adequate mobile terminals (under usability and transaction- security aspects) – Sufficiently stable and performant mobile network – Sufficiently stable and performant DFS infrastructure • But it needs more: – Adequate regulatory framework and oversight processes – Adequate structures and processes for customer protection 14 ​​​​​​ITU Workshop on Quality of Service and Quality of Experience​​ of Digital Financial Services​​ About the need to regulate • Is it “popular”?
Language:English
Score: 962495.1 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/W...0512/Documents/Session%202.pdf
Data Source: un
Most commonly, the term "Data Quality" is described as data that is "Fit-for-use" (Wang & Strong, 1996), which implies that it is relative, as data considered appropriate for one use may not possess sufficient attributes for another use (Tayi & Ballou, 1998). (...) The major focus of this paper will be the IMF data quality framework the Data Quality Assessment Framework December 6, 2010 Uganda Bureau of Statistics <> Plot 9 Colville Street <> Website: www.ubos.org Tel: +256(0)-41-4706000 <> E-mail: ubos@ubos.org 5 IMF data quality framework the Data Quality Assessment Framework and the CountryStat or FAO Stat Data Quality Framework that are analyzed below. (...) For each dimension, the DQAF identifies 3-5 elements of good practice, and for each element, several relevant indicators. Data Quality Dimensions of the FAOSTAT / CountrySTAT Dimensions •Relevance and completeness Collection of relevant data with sufficient statistical metadata makes understanding of the data items easier.
Language:English
Score: 962186.3 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...PDF/ICASV_3.1_111_PPT_Ouma.pdf
Data Source: un
Title: Video and Web Service Quality Monitoring using ITU-T Standards at Deutsche Telekom Abstract: With millions of fixed-network connections across Germany, Deutsche Telekom is continuously ensuring that they deliver the best quality to their customers. In order to monitor the experienced quality of video and web services, the use of low-level network Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) is not sufficient. (...) Besides other systems, Deutsche Telekom relies on a distributed monitoring system that employs recent ITU-T standards such as P.1203 to characterize the Quality of Experience of video streaming and web services.
Language:English
Score: 956796.5 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/W...ents/S4P1-robitza-abstract.pdf
Data Source: un
Without these, the infrastructure and the human and financial resources needed to ensure the availability of sufficient supplies of safe blood and blood products are unlikely to be provided. (...) Blood transfusions can help patients suffering from life-threatening conditions live a longer and higher quality life. It also has an essential, life-saving role in the care of mothers and young children. (...) WHO’s strategy for blood safety and availability addresses five key areas: the establishment of well-organized, nationally-coordinated blood transfusion services to ensure the timely availability of safe blood and blood products for all patients requiring transfusion; the collection of blood from voluntary unpaid blood donors from low-risk populations; quality-assured testing for transfusion-transmitted infections, blood grouping and compatibility testing; the safe and appropriate use of blood and a reduction in unnecessary transfusions; and quality systems covering the entire transfusion process, from donor recruitment to the follow-up of transfusion recipients.
Language:English
Score: 956452.7 - https://www.who.int/westernpac...-safe-blood-and-blood-products
Data Source: un
PROVISIONS CONCERNING QUALITY The purpose of the standard is to define the quality requirements of sweet inshell almonds at the export control stage, after preparation and packaging. (...) They must be free from defects with the exception of very slight superficial defects provided these do not affect the general appearance of the produce, the quality, keeping quality and presentation in the package. (...) Empty nut shell: almond shell containing no kernel (aborted kernel). Sufficiently developed: almond kernel of normal shape, without aborted or dried out portions; shrunken and shrivelled kernels are not sufficiently developed.
Language:English
Score: 954601.8 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA...ngs/ge.02/document/2002_08.pdf
Data Source: un
Affordability ............................................................................................. 8 7. Water quality ............................................................................................ 8 8. (...) E/CN.4/Sub.2/2005/25 page 6 1.3 Everyone has the right to a water and sanitation service that is: (a) Physically accessible within, or in the immediate vicinity of the household, educational institution, workplace or health institution; (b) Of sufficient and culturally acceptable quality; (c) In a location where physical security can be guaranteed; (d) Supplied at a price that everyone can afford without compromising their ability to acquire other basic goods and services. 2. (...) No one should be deprived of the minimum essential amount of water or access to basic sanitation facilities. 7. Water quality 7.1 States should establish water-quality standards on the basis of the World Health Organization guidelines, taking account of the needs of vulnerable groups and upon consultation with users. 7.2 Water-quality standards should give priority to the elimination of the pollutants with the most significant impact on health in the particular country or context, rather than to the setting of high thresholds that cannot be attained immediately within the available resources.
Language:English
Score: 949907 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de.../SUb_Com_Guisse_guidelines.pdf
Data Source: un