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It is also a key principle of engagement for the current strategic framework. From 2007, IFAD's Targeting Policy has made poverty targeting a requirement in all IFAD investments. (...) Based on these findings, the ARRI recommends revising the 2007 Targeting Policy and guidelines in order to establish greater clarity on who IFAD interventions should target. (...) If IFAD is serious about targeting extremely poor people living in remote rural areas, then the Targeting Policy needs to clearly establish them as IFAD's primary target group.
Language:English
Score: 497613.7 - https://www.ifad.org/fr/web/io...-poor-and-leave-no-one-behind-
Data Source: un
It is also a key principle of engagement for the current strategic framework. From 2007, IFAD's Targeting Policy has made poverty targeting a requirement in all IFAD investments. (...) Based on these findings, the ARRI recommends revising the 2007 Targeting Policy and guidelines in order to establish greater clarity on who IFAD interventions should target. (...) If IFAD is serious about targeting extremely poor people living in remote rural areas, then the Targeting Policy needs to clearly establish them as IFAD's primary target group.
Language:English
Score: 497613.7 - https://www.ifad.org/pt-BR/web...-poor-and-leave-no-one-behind-
Data Source: un
Reporting guidelines_Bernardini 1 The Protocol on Water and Health Guidelines for summary reports Workshop on setting targets and reporting under the Protocol on Water and Health, 10-11 February 2009, Geneva, Switzerland Francesca Bernardini, Co-Secretary of the Protocol, UNECE 2 The Protocol on Water and Health BackgroundBackground The Protocol requires Parties to: collect and evaluate data on their progress towards targets, and on indicators showing how far progress has contributed towards reducing water-related disease. (...) General aspects Information on the process of target setting ( authority (ies) involved, national and international strategies and legislations, cost-benefit analysis ). (...) Effectiveness of management, protection and use of freshwater resources Water quality Based an national classification systems percentage of the number of water bodies or percentage of the volume of water falling into each defined class (e.g. in classes I, II, III, etc., for non-EU countries; for EU countries percentage of surface waters with high, good, moderate, poor and bad ecological status and percentage of groundwaters /surface waters of good or poor chemical status) Water use Water exploitation index at the national and river-basin levels for each sector (agriculture, industry, domestic) 13 The Protocol on Water and Health Part III: Targets and target dates set and assessment of progress Part III: Targets and target dates set and assessment of progress For each target set in the different target areas as well as for any additional target: Target, target date, baseline conditions and justification for the adoption of such target: Actions taken to reach the target and difficulties and challenges encountered Assessment of progress towards the target: Target and target date need to be revised?
Language:English
Score: 497613.7 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA...ng%20guidelines_Bernardini.pdf
Data Source: un
., copyrights, patents, licenses policies) and pricing policies; b) The intermediator receives datasets or big data services' output, registers metadata and re- publishes the metadata to a data target (e.g., BDC (0), BDC (1) or BDSP (T)); c) If a data target discovers the target datasets or big data services' output and accepts the declared data rights (i.e., copyrights, patents, licenses policies and pricing policies), the data target sends a purchase order to the intermediator; d) When the intermediator receives the purchase order from the data target, the intermediator distributes the required datasets to the data target, or produces the required big data services' output and provides to the data target; e) When the data target finishes the reception of datasets or big data services' output (e.g., by download or media delivery), the data target requests the data source and the intermediator (optionally) to delete the original datasets or the produced big data services' output, and the ownership of datasets will be transferred to the data target. NOTE – In this sense, the data target becomes a new data ownership that holds the data rights, and potentially, becomes another new data source. Pre-conditions a) There is a contract in place between the data source (e.g., data provider, including data supplier (optional) ) and the intermediator (e.g., big data service provider and data broker); b) There is a contract in place between the data target (e.g., big data service customer) and the intermediator; c) The intermediator is responsible for matching the purchase and sale contract between the data source and the data target; d) The data source published the metadata and declared the copyrights, patents, licenses policies and pricing policies and guaranteed the integrity, availability and authenticity of the datasets; e) The data target discovered the metadata and accepted the declared copyrights, patents, licenses policies and pricing; f) The data source, the intermediator and the data target complied with the business trade agreement, and the intermediator matched the purchase and sale contracts when appropriate between the data source and the data target.
Language:English
Score: 497585.3 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...a/files/basic-html/page95.html
Data Source: un
Microsoft Word - TM Targetting and Universalism3.doc TARGETING AND UNIVERSALISM IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES Thandika Mkandawire Conceptual case Aid is nowadays understood not so much in terms of helping developing countries, but in terms of helping the poor. (...) “Targeting” the poor is not premised on an egalitarian ideology. (...) However, advocates of targeting have often argued that “universalism” is not redistributive, while targeting is.
Language:English
Score: 497259.33 - https://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/m...tings/2005/docs/Mkandawire.pdf
Data Source: un
Increasing coverage overall, via more universally leaning targeting. Acknowledging that where targeting is broader (or programmes are universal – e.g. universal child benefits) shock-induced needs are preemptively addressed. (...) Increasing coverage overall, via more universally- leaning targeting 8Technical Note: Targeting for social protection in humanitarian and fragile contexts The options available in any country depend on the mix of routine programmes available, their routine targeting (along the four stages of ‘targeting’), and their subsequent coverage of routine caseloads. (...) Preparedness for the future: pre-planned changes to routine targeting approaches Dominica: embedding emergency targeting criteria into a routine Manual of Operations to enhance preparedness for future shocks
Language:English
Score: 497211.77 - https://www.unicef.org/media/1...cal%20Note%20-%20Targeting.pdf
Data Source: un
Background: The Protocol on Water and Health requires Parties to establish and publish national and/or local targets and target dates in different areas in order to achieve or maintain a high level for the protection of human health and well-being and for the sustainable management of water resources. (...) The areas in which targets should be set are scattered across different policy sectors and call for close cooperation among different authorities. (...) In preparation for the workshop, Parties were kindly requested to fill out a short template (see table below) indicating their current stage in the process of target-setting, the targets set already (if applicable) and the next steps planned as well as challenges and success stories.
Language:English
Score: 497062.1 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA...gs/target_setting_workshop.htm
Data Source: un
C2018, C18 1 Guidelines to support delegations in the preparation of policy statements for PP-18 Background on the ITU strategic framework 2020-2023: beyond the Connect 2020 Agenda In the forthcoming 2018 Plenipotentiary Conference, ITU membership is gearing up to confirm its support to the Connect 2020 Agenda and renew its vision for the telecommunication/ICT sector beyond 2020. The measurable targets representing the five key goals that are part of the proposed 2020-2023 ITU strategic plan, as endorsed by the 2018 Session of Council, set the high-level impact the Union wants to see in the world. The common vision of “an information society, empowered by the interconnected world, where telecommunication/ICTs enable and accelerate social, economic and environmentally sustainable growth and development for everyone”, is complemented by the five proposed goals and related targets: 1. Growth – Enable and foster access to and increased use of telecommunication/ICT in support of the digital economy and society; 2. (...) The Union also recognizes the need to contribute to the global partnership to strengthen the role of telecommunication/ICTs as means of implementation of the WSIS Action Lines and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Targets Target Goal 1: Growth Target 1.1: by 2023, 65% of households worldwide with access to the Internet Target 1.2: by 2023, 70% of individuals worldwide will be using the Internet Target 1.3: by 2023, Internet access should be 25% more affordable (baseline year 2017) Target 1.4: by 2023, all countries adopt a digital agenda/strategy Target 1.5: by 2023, increase the number of broadband subscriptions by 50% Target 1.6: by 2023, 40% of countries to have more than half of the broadband subscriptions more than 10 Mbit/s Target 1.7: by 2023, 40% of population should be interacting with government services online Goal 2: Inclusiveness Target 2.1: by 2023, in the developing world, 60% of households should have access to the Internet Target 2.2: by 2023, in the least developed countries, 30% of households should have access to the Internet Target 2.3: by 2023, in the developing world, 60% of individuals will be using the Internet Target 2.4: by 2023, in the least developed countries, 30% of individuals will be using the Internet Target 2.5: by 2023, the affordability gap between developed and developing countries should be reduced by 25% (baseline year 2017) Target 2.6: by 2023, broadband services should cost no more than 3% of average monthly income in developing countries Target 2.7: by 2023, 96% of world population covered by broadband services Target 2.8: by 2023, gender equality in Internet usage and mobile phone ownership should be achieved Target 2.9: by 2023, enabling environments ensuring accessible telecommunications/ICTs for persons with disabilities should be established in all countries Target 2.10: by 2023, improve by 40% the proportion of youth/adults with telecommunication/ICT skills Goal 3: Sustainability Target 3.1: by 2023, improve cybersecurity preparedness of countries, with key capabilities: presence of strategy, national computer incident/emergency response teams and legislation Target 3.2: by 2023, increase the global e-waste recycling rate to 30% Target 3.3: by 2023, raise the percentage of countries with an e-waste legislation to 50% Target 3.4: by 2023, net telecommunication/ICT-enabled Greenhouse Gas abatement should have increased by 30% compared to the 2015 baseline Target 3.5: by 2023, all countries should have a National Emergency Telecommunication Plan as part of their national and local disaster risk reduction strategies 5 Goal 4: Innovation Target 4.1: by 2023, all countries should have policies/strategies fostering telecommunication/ICT-centric innovation Goal 5: Partnership Target 5.1: by 2023, increased effective partnerships with stakeholders and cooperation with other organization and entities in the telecommunication/ICT environment _________________
Language:English
Score: 497023.93 - https://www.itu.int/web/pp-18/...dance-policy-statements-en.pdf
Data Source: un
Targeting 導航 略過到內容 語言選擇器 ar العربية en english es español fr français Toggle navigation Why rural people? (...) / Our approach / Targeting / Targeting Focusing efforts to create opportunities for rural poor people Why is targeting necessary? (...) Who is IFAD's target group? IFAD's mandate defines its target group as rural people living in poverty and experiencing food insecurity in developing countries.
Language:English
Score: 496952.9 - https://www.ifad.org/zh-TW/targeting
Data Source: un
/ Our approach / Targeting / Targeting Focusing efforts to create opportunities for rural poor people Why is targeting necessary? (...) Who is IFAD's target group? IFAD's mandate defines its target group as rural people living in poverty and experiencing food insecurity in developing countries. (...) IFAD targeting policy: Reaching the rural poor december 2008 - CORPORATE policy    policies_and_strategies    The purpose of this policy is to provide a clear definition of IFAD’s target group and establish a shared conceptual understanding of targeting.
Language:English
Score: 496952.9 - https://www.ifad.org/nl/targeting
Data Source: un