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Figure 6 The UN System Three-Point Comprehensive Response to COVID-19 Source: UN, September 2020 25. The importance of housing to the big picture for cities is stressed in a number of OECD publications including Housing amid Covid-19: Policy Responses and Challenges (2020) and Building for a better tomorrow: Policies to make housing more affordable (2021), that identifies how “the Covid-19 pandemic has severely disrupted construction, made it difficult for many households to pay for shelter, and seriously hurt the housing sector.”1 In addition, the OECD makes clear, that swift responses by governments to alleviate the negative consequences of the crisis for tenants, borrowers, builders and lenders can in some instances, impede a recovery and/or impair the responsiveness of the housing market to the evolving needs of society quoting the example that rental market restrictions can help tenants in the short-term, but weaken supply responses by making housing investment less responsive to changes in demand and pose obstacles to residential mobility. The OECD work https://www.oecd.org/coronavirus/policy-responses/housing-amid-covid-19-policy-responses-and-challenges-cfdc08a8/ https://www.oecd.org/coronavirus/policy-responses/housing-amid-covid-19-policy-responses-and-challenges-cfdc08a8/ ECE/HBP/2021/2 10 looks at new emerging evidence of the impact of COVID-19 on construction activity and prospects and the balance between short-term incentives for affordability and ensuring sufficient, environmentally sustainable supply. 26. (...) Solutions: • Governments could tailor responses for high-risk neighbourhoods given the spatial disparities in COVID-19 impact and resilience; • Innovative short-term responses to inadequate and unaffordable housing, overcrowding and homelessness could be a starting point for … policy shifts; • Access to essential public services is key for effective COVIDS response, recovery and building resilience to future crises in cities; • Equitable access to health services helps to protect lives; • Targeted interventions to vulnerable groups recognises differentiated exposure to risks and impacts. 2.
Language:English
Score: 607949.56 - https://unece.org/sites/defaul...s/2021-08/ECE_HBP_2021_2-E.pdf
Data Source: un
Purchases are nearly always for cash. The housing loans that do exist are short-term, usually for up to three years. (...) In the short and medium term, housing conditions in Moldova may deteriorate particularly for the poorest people. (...) This will serve all those in national housing and allow for international comparison. The report is also available on the Internet http://www.unece.org/env/hs/welcome.html   For further information, please contact: Christina von SCHWEINICHEN, Deputy Director UNECE Environment and Human Settlements Division Palais des Nations, office 340 CH - 1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland Phone: +41(0)22 917 23 88 Fax: +41(0)22 917 01 07 E-mail: christina.schweinichen@unece.org or: Veikko VASKO UNECE Environment and Human Settlements Division Palais des Nations, office 328 CH - 1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland Phone: +41(0)22 917 19 27 Fax: +41(0)22 917 01 07 E-mail: veikko.vasko@unece.org Ref: ECE/ENV/02/04 Print this page © United Nations Economic Commission for Europe | Terms of Use | Privacy Notice |
Language:English
Score: 606943.26 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/press/pr2002/02env04e.htm
Data Source: un
Cooperation on Migration Statistics in the UNECE region Workshop on Migration Statistics Rome, Italy, 30 November-2 December 2016 UNECE and Migration Statistics • Joint UNECE/Eurostat Work Session on Migration Statistics • Capacity-building workshops • Methodological Work – Recently completed Task Force on Measuring Circular Migration – Two ongoing task forces • Clearing House on Migration Statistics 2 Ongoing methodological work on migration statistics • Data integration for measuring migration – Task Force mandate - October 2015 to April 2018 – Survey disseminated to countries in Fall 2016 • Measuring labour mobility – Task Force mandate - October 2015 to April 2018 – Coordination with ILO Working Group – Focus on case studies (Israel, Mexico, Norway) 3 Benefits of Data Exchange • Provides information missing from regular national data collection systems (e.g. number of citizens living abroad) • Provides information about the characteristics and conditions of citizens living abroad 4 Related Activities at UNECE • Task Force on Measuring Emigration (2005-2008) – Pilot study on data exchange (2007) – Guidelines on the use of data on international immigration to improve emigration data of sending countries (2009) • Clearing House of Migration Statistics (2011-) – Set of standard tables on stocks and flows for bilateral exchange among countries – Data collected every two years (2011, 2013, 2015, 2017, ...) 5 Content of the Clearing House • Seven tables • Short-term migration statistics collected, but not enough data to present Table 1: Foreign Born Population • Population by place of birth • Foreign-born population by country of birth Table 2: Population by citizenship • Population by citizenship status • Foreigners by country of citizenship Table 3: Long-term immigration by country of previous residence (flows) Table 4: Long-term emigration by country of next residence (flows) Table 5: Long-term immigration by citizenship (flows) • by citizenship status • non-citizens by country of citizenship Table 6: Long-term emigration by citizenship (flows) • by citizenship status • non-citizens by country of citizenship Table 7: Citizenship acquisition • by status of recipient • by country of previous citizenship 6 http://w3.unece.org/PXWeb2015/pxweb/en/STAT/STAT__30-GE__99-MCH_1 7 http://w3.unece.org/PXWeb2015/pxweb/en/STAT/STAT__30-GE__99-MCH_1 8 Data Assessment Table Timeliness (% providing data for 2013 or later) Completeness (% with full availability of cross-sectional data) Periodicity (% providing annual data) 1 Population by Age, Country of birth, Sex, Country and Year 0% 50% 8% 2 Population by Age, Country of citizenship, Sex, Country and Year 0% 58% 8% 3 Long-term immigration by country of previous residence 58% 50% 50% 4 Long-term emigration by country of next residence 67% 58% 75% 5 Long-term immigration by citizenship status 42% 50% 33% 6 Long-term emigration by citizenship status 50% 58% 50% 7 Citizenship acquisition by country of previous citizenship 67% 42% 67% 9 Different data sources for migrants to Russian Federation (2013) Tajikistan and Ukraine data from 2012 10 Population Living in CIS Country other than Country of Birth as percentage of population of country of birth Note: Data are from most recent Census Round (2010). (...) Turkmenistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan did not provide data on foreign born living in their country 11 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Conclusion • The Clearing House relies on data provided by statistical offices • Data from other countries can provide data that are missing or potentially inadequate in national data collection systems, e.g. emigrants and citizens living abroad 12 Cooperation on Migration Statistics in the UNECE region UNECE and Migration Statistics Ongoing methodological work on migration statistics Benefits of Data Exchange Related Activities at UNECE Content of the Clearing House Slide Number 7 Slide Number 8 Data Assessment Different data sources for migrants to Russian Federation (2013) Population Living in CIS Country other than Country of Birthas percentage of population of country of birth Conclusion
Language:English
Score: 606068.36 - https://www.un.org/development...essionvi_nathanmentonunece.pdf
Data Source: un
Both categories of users are requested to accept the Clearing HouseTerms of Use” (see Addendum 1) that set forth general guidelines on quality. The Terms of Use are available on the Clearing House website. Within these Terms of Use, the Clearing House Content Managers have the discretion to determine the suitability of information for inclusion on the Clearing House.
Language:English
Score: 605876.95 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA....2005.03-EUR.05.5046203.03.pdf
Data Source: un
Both categories of users are requested to accept the Clearing HouseTerms of Use” (see Addendum 1) that set forth general guidelines on quality. The Terms of Use are available on the Clearing House website. Within these Terms of Use, the Clearing House Content Managers have the discretion to determine the suitability of information for inclusion on the Clearing House.
Language:English
Score: 605876.95 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA.../clearing/documents/2005-3.pdf
Data Source: un
She serves on a fixed-term appointment at the P4 level. 2. On 18 October 2013, the Applicant filed the present Application challenging the Respondent’s decision to recover the Monthly Residential Security Allowance (MRSA) paid to her from April 2011 through January 2013. 3. (...) On 1 April 2011, the Applicant moved out of Rosslyn Lone Tree and into Rosslyn Valley Estate (RVE). This house was classified by SSS/UNON as a stand-alone house in a shared compound, within the meaning of the Revised Kenya MORSS. (...) The Tribunal takes the view that it could not have been the intention of the framers of the Staff Rule, in the absence of any express provision, to include in the term “calendar days” the days on which the Organization is not working. 39.
Language:English
Score: 605539.6 - www.un.org/en/internalj...dt/judgments/undt-2015-007.pdf
Data Source: oaj
untitled GE.14-09143 (E) *1409143* Economic Commission for Europe Committee on Housing and Land Management Seventy-fifth session Geneva, 8-9 October 2014 Item 7(a) of the provisional agenda Review of the implementation of the programme of work 2014-2015 Sustainable housing and real estate markets Draft Terms of Reference of the Real Estate Market Advisory Group for 2015-2016 Note by the Bureau of the Committee Summary At is seventy-fourth session on 7 and 9 October 2013, the Committee endorsed the extension of the mandate of the UNECE Real Estate Market Advisory Group until the end of 2014, under its existing terms of reference. (...) At its meeting on 6 May 2014, the Bureau of the Committee agreed to recommend that the mandate of the Advisory Group be extended until the end of 2016 based on the draft revised terms of reference in this document. The Committee is invited to recommend the extension of the mandate of the Advisory Group until the end of 2016 and to endorse the draft terms of reference. (...) The activities of the Advisory Group may address: (a) Energy efficient housing; (b) Affordable and social housing; (c) Housing finance (including transparent and advanced financial products for housing); (d) Property valuation and registration; (e) Land markets and land administration. 4.
Language:English
Score: 604066.94 - https://unece.org/DAM/hlm/docu...nts/2014/ECE_HBP_2014_5.en.pdf
Data Source: un
As Leilani Farha, UN Special Rapporteur on the right to adequate housing, says, “Housing has become the front line defence against the coronavirus. (...) Immediate, short-term actions should be focused on containing the spread of infection, while longer-term interventions should include a review of the current approaches to housing and land governance. (...) Homeless people often already experience severe respiratory problems that can be aggravated by COVID-19. • In the short term, UN-Habitat urges national, regional and local governments to, at a minimum, adopt the following emergency measures: o Provide temporary emergency accommodation with basic hygiene facilities to all people without secure housing so that they can practice social distancing and other necessary public health measures such as quarantine and self-isolation.
Language:English
Score: 603498.34 - https://unhabitat.org/sites/de..._and_covid-19_key_messages.pdf
Data Source: un
Microsoft PowerPoint - stead.ppt [Read-Only] OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 1Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Policy integration and institutional arrangements: experiences and lessons from Denmark, England and Germany Dr Dominic Stead OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies Delft University of Technology The Netherlands d.stead@otb.tudelft.nl http://www.otb.tudelft.nl OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 2Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Content • introduction • definitions and concepts • impact assessment techniques • institutional arrangements • conclusions OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 3Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Introduction “Sustainability requires that policy-making for urban travel be viewed in a holistic sense: that planning for transport, land-use and the environment no longer be undertaken in isolation one from the other... (...) European Conference of Ministers of Transport (2001) the need for policy integration is widely supported BUT information about how to do so (especially in terms of institutional arrangements) is hard to find OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 4Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia The research • experiences of policy integration in local authorities in Denmark, England and Germany: Copenhagen Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Freiburg • focus on the integration of three specific areas of policy: land use planning transport environment • based primarily on in-depth interviews with key actors involved in policy making • research carried out in 2002 for the Netherlands Agency for Energy and the Environment (NOVEM) OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 5Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Definitions and concepts • various terms in the policy integration literature, such as: coherence consistency collaboration co-operation coordination integration • some research sees some differences between these terms; some does not • hierarchy of terms proposed: policy co-operation = dialogue and information policy coordination, policy coherence and policy consistency (all quite similar) = co-operation plus transparency and some attempt to avoid policy conflicts (but similar goals not necessarily used) policy integration and joined-up policy = policy coordination plus joint working, attempts to create synergies between policies (win-win situations) and the use of the same goals to formulate policy OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 6Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Hierarchy of terms OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 7Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Examples of different types of policy integration CG RG1 RG2 RG3 LG1a LG1b LG1c LG1d LG3a LG3b LG3c LG3dLG2a LG2b LG2c LG2d VERTICAL INTEGRATION HORIZONTAL INTEGRATION Integration between different tiers of government , different departments, adjacent authorities and other agencies. (...) • some examples include: sustainability appraisal transport assessments air quality management causal chain analysis OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 9Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Impact assessment techniques sustainability appraisal • required as part of the process of preparing regional planning policies • compatibility of policies • health impact assessment of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough structure plan carried out alongside the sustainability appraisal transport assessments • required to be submitted alongside the planning application for new developments with significant transport implications • interesting opportunity for transport and land-use agendas to come together OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 10Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Impact assessment techniques air quality management • air quality considerations required to be taken into account when preparing land use plans and transport policies • where air quality is poor (or is forecast to be poor in the future), local authorities are required to prepare an action plan showing how the air quality problem will be tackled through planning, transport, etc causal chain analysis • local transport plans (LTPs) must show a clear link between objectives, measures and outputs • causal chain analysis is one way of doing this • stimulates inter-sectoral considerations OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 11Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Example of causal chain analysis OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 12Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Institutional arrangements joint team working • considered more effective in terms of time, resources and expertise • possible mechanism for saving money and improving policy co-ordination political support • policy implementation requires political support for policy approval • securing this political support is sometimes problematic because decisions may only have long-term and/or rather intangible impacts shared budgets and responsibilities • consensus that policy integration is more effective when there is a balanced (fairly even), clear division of budgets and responsibilities OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 13Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Institutional arrangements shared goals • policy integration requires a set of shared goals, which necessitates procedures, rules and guidelines that promote policy consistency • information, communication and professional training also important procedures and guidelines • no formal procedures set out by local or national government to formulate integrated policy • most procedures currently developed through trial-and-error key individuals and networks • importance of strongly motivated officers and/or extensive professional networks • benchmarking and staff mobility can help to extend professional networks OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 14Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia Conclusions and lessons • no single measure or technique can bring about policy integration • similar approaches in different settings may have different effects • there is no single model for effective policy integration • various factors can affect the impact of different approaches (e.g. cultural, political and organisational factors) • HOWEVER, some of the examples of instruments, techniques and institutional arrangements offer potentially promising contributions to policy integration in a variety of situations • integrated policies provide no guarantee of integrated practice (implementation) integrated policy should not be seen as an end in itself but as a potential means of influencing more integrated outcomes OTB Research Institute for Housing, Mobility and Urban Studies 15Workshop on Sustainable and Healthy Urban Transport and Planning, 16-18 November 2003, Nicosia END
Language:English
Score: 603472.46 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA...plan/urban/documents/stead.pdf
Data Source: un
It has also shown that it is possible to quickly address housing emergencies as local and national governments provide temporary solutions including: KEY MESSAGES SEPTEMBER 2020 2 • Short term and emergency accommodation for people without secure housing through underutilized spaces and repurposing of buildings. • Moratoriums on evictions due to rental and mortgage arrears or forced evictions of informal settlements and slums along with suspension of utility costs and surcharges for the duration of the pandemic. • Access to buildings, land and open space for essential small businesses, food security, emergency health care and other vital functions needed while people stay at home. While these steps are timely and important, they need to become sustainable long-term changes enshrined in policy and legislation. (...) People must be empowered and equipped to contribute to and shape the housing where they live. We need to facilitate the right framing and incentives for unlocking long-term political commitment, creativity, investment and local ownership for housing all in our future cities.
Language:English
Score: 602863.8 - https://www.uneca.org/sites/de...at-Day/whd_key_messages_en.pdf
Data Source: un