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Hypercholesterolemia is an umbrella term that refers to acquired or genetic disorders that result in high levels of lipids (fats, cholesterol, or triglycerides) in the blood. Hypercholesterolemia, is more commonly known as excessively high cholesterol, is usually chronic and requires ongoing medication to control blood lipid levels. This can easily lead to early heart disease if not managed or controlled. Although high cholesterol can be inherited, it's more often the result of unhealthy lifestyle choices. (...) I am pleased to share that with a healthy lifestyle, physical activity and medicine, my own invisible enemy of high cholesterol is now under control after 26 years. Thankfully now, I can live a long and sustainable life - the true ultimate goal and reward for investing in one’s own health.
Language:English
Score: 2277464.8 - https://www.unicef.org/southaf...battle-against-invisible-enemy
Data Source: un
In addition to managing weight, blood pressure and cholesterol, a healthy diet can help prevent and manage of a number of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and some cancers. (...) Almost half (45%) of all deaths among children under the age of five are linked to undernutrition. Unhealthy diet is the greatest underlying cause of deaths worldwide, accounting for 11 million deaths each year. (...) One of the ways this works is because many types of fibre reduce the levels of LDL cholesterol (the ‘bad’ cholesterol) in a person’s blood, which in turn lowers his or her risk of heart disease.
Language:English
Score: 2125698.4 - https://www.fao.org/pulses-201.../news/news-detail/en/c/386990/
Data Source: un
In addition to managing weight, blood pressure and cholesterol, a healthy diet can help prevent and manage of a number of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and some cancers. (...) Almost half (45%) of all deaths among children under the age of five are linked to undernutrition. Unhealthy diet is the greatest underlying cause of deaths worldwide, accounting for 11 million deaths each year. (...) One of the ways this works is because many types of fibre reduce the levels of LDL cholesterol (the ‘bad’ cholesterol) in a person’s blood, which in turn lowers his or her risk of heart disease.
Language:English
Score: 2125698.4 - https://www.fao.org/pulses-201.../news/news-detail/it/c/386990/
Data Source: un
Most noncommunicable diseases are the result of four particular behaviours (tobacco use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, and the harmful use of alcohol) that lead to four key metabolic/physiological changes (raised blood pressure, overweight/obesity, raised blood glucose and raised cholesterol). Download Data Related indicators NCD risk factors: Fasting blood glucose Raised fasting blood glucose (>=7.0 mmol/L)(age-standardized estimate) Raised fasting blood glucose (>= 7.0 mmol/L) (crude estimate) Mean fasting blood glucose (mmol/L)(age-standardized estimate) NCD risk factors: Blood pressure Prevalence of hypertension among adults aged 30-79 years Prevalence of previous diagnosis of hypertension among adults aged 30-79 with hypertension Prevalence of treatment (taking medicine) for hypertension among adults aged 30-79 with hypertension Prevalence of controlled hypertension among adults aged 30-79 years with hypertension Raised blood pressure (SBP>=140 OR DBP>=90) (age-standardized estimate) Raised blood pressure (SBP>=140 OR DBP>=90) (crude estimate) Mean systolic blood pressure (age-standardized estimate) NCD risk factors: Cholesterol Mean Total Cholesterol (crude estimate) Mean Total Cholesterol (age-standardized estimate) Mean non-HDL cholesterol (crude estimate) Mean non-HDL cholesterol (age-standardized estimate) Mean HDL cholesterol (crude) Mean HDL cholesterol (age-standardized) NCD risk factors: Harmful use of alcohol Alcohol, total per capita (15+) consumption (in litres of pure alcohol) (SDG Indicator 3.5.2) Alcohol, unrecorded per capita (15+) consumption (in litres of pure alcohol) with 95%CI Alcohol, recorded per capita (15+) consumption (in litres of pure alcohol) Alcohol, total (recorded + unrecorded) per capita (15+) consumption with 95%CI, projections to 2025 NCD risk factors: Insufficient physical activity Prevalence of insufficient physical activity among adults aged 18+ years (age-standardized estimate) (%) Prevalence of insufficient physical activity among school going adolescents aged 11-17 years NCD risk factors: Overweight / Obesity Prevalence of overweight among adults, BMI >= 25 (age-standardized estimate) (%) Prevalence of overweight among children and adolescents, BMI > +1 standard deviations above the median (crude estimate) (%) Prevalence of overweight among adults, BMI >= 25 (crude estimate) (%) Prevalence of obesity among adults, BMI >= 30 (age-standardized estimate) (%) Prevalence of obesity among adults, BMI >= 30 (crude estimate) (%) Prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents, BMI > +2 standard deviations above the median (crude estimate) (%) Mean BMI (kg/m²) (age-standardized estimate) Mean BMI (kg/m²) (crude estimate) NCD risk factors: Tobacco use Non-age-standardized estimates of daily tobacco use, tobacco smoking and cigarette smoking (Tobacco control: Monitor) Current tobacco use, tobacco smoking and cigarette smoking (non-age standardized) Age-standardized estimates of daily tobacco use, tobacco smoking and cigarette smoking (Tobacco control: Monitor) Current tobacco use, tobacco smoking and cigarette smoking (age-standardized) If you have any feedback, you are welcome to write it here .
Language:English
Score: 2011569.1 - https://www.who.int/data/gho/d...c-details/GHO/ncd-risk-factors
Data Source: un
The cause of heart attacks and strokes are usually the presence of a combination of risk factors, such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet and obesity, physical inactivity and use of alcohol, hypertension, diabetes and high level of cholesterol. (...) Increase regular physical activity to at least 2.5 hours per week Physical activity contributes to improved blood pressure, improved levels of cholesterol and other blood lipids, and weight control. (...) It is also important to talk to your health worker if you have behavioural risks (unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, use of tobacco and alcohol) so they can help you plan the lifestyle modifications you should take to get your heart health back on track.
Language:English
Score: 1971834.8 - https://www.who.int/philippine...take-care-of-your-heart-health
Data Source: un
South-East Asia Nepal Home Health topics Our work News Emergencies About us Home / News / Detail / Persistent high prevalence of non-communicable diseases risk factors in Nepal Persistent high prevalence of non-communicable diseases risk factors in Nepal 17 March 2020 Highlights Nepal The latest Noncommunicable Diseases  (NCDs) Risk Factors STEPS Survey in Nepal 2019 shows that unhealthy behavior remains high amongst the Nepali people.  Unhealthy behavior (risk factors ) such as tobacco and alcohol use; unhealthy diets ; lack of physical activity ; and metabolic risk factors like raised blood glucose, raised blood pressure, raised blood cholesterol, and overweight/obesity; are the important factors responsible for life-threatening illnesses such as  cardiovascular diseases ,  diabetes ,  cancer , and  chronic respiratory diseases .
Language:English
Score: 1961934.2 - https://www.who.int/nepal/news...diseases-risk-factors-in-nepal
Data Source: un
Behavioural risk factors for NCDs (tobacco use, insufficient physical activity, harmful use of alcohol and unhealthy diet) and metabolic risk factors (raised blood pressure, overweight/obesity, raised cholesterol and raised blood sugar) are highly prevalent in the Thai population.
Language:English
Score: 1801105 - https://www.who.int/thailand/o...ity-4-noncommunicable-diseases
Data Source: un
The risk-prediction charts integrate the following risk factors when predicting the risk of a heart attack or stroke in the 10 year period following the patient assessment: age sex tobacco use blood pressure diabetes status blood cholesterol. The pocket guide also incorporates management recommendations, based on the risk of developing heart attacks and strokes, in the following areas: smoking cessation dietary changes physical activity weight control alcohol intake antihypertensive drugs lipid-lowering drugs hypoglycaemic drugs antiplatelet drugs anticoagulant treatment revascularization surgery drugs that are not recommended. (...) Urbanization and globalization promote tobacco use, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. These risk factors result in increased risk of people developing heart attacks and strokes because the result is raised levels of blood pressure, blood glucose, blood cholesterol and body weight. (...) These indicators of risk include gender, age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status, diabetes and total blood cholesterol. For use in low-resource settings, where blood cholesterol measurement is not routinely available, alternative charts have been developed that predict risk without blood cholesterol.
Language:English
Score: 1772047.5 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...icting-heart-attack-and-stroke
Data Source: un
Diets rich in salt and alcohol, combined with a lack of exercise, often results in high blood pressure, which in turn increases the risks of stroke and heart diseases, while diets rich in saturated fats can increase cholesterol levels. “Urbanization, supermarketization, and the global spread of Western lifestyles have shaken up traditional food habits. (...) A recent study covering television advertising in Australia, Asia, Western Europe, and North and South America found that children were exposed to high volumes of television advertising for unhealthy foods, featuring child-oriented persuasive techniques. (...) They are: imposing taxes on unhealthy products; regulating foods high in saturated fats, salt and sugar; cracking down on junk food advertising; overhauling “wrong-headed” agricultural subsidies making unhealthy ingredients cheaper than others; and supporting local food production.
Language:English
Score: 1735254.3 - https://www.ohchr.org/en/stori...3/right-food-impacts-bad-diets
Data Source: un
These factors include tobacco use, unhealthy diet, harmful use of alcohol, lack of physical activity, and exposure to persistent stress as well as obesity, high cholesterol and diabetes mellitus. (...) People with high blood pressure that also have high blood sugar, elevated blood cholesterol or kidney damage face even higher risk of heart attacks and stroke. Therefore it is important that regular checks for blood sugar, blood cholesterol and urine albumin take place. Everyone can take five concrete steps to minimize the odds of developing high blood pressure and its adverse consequences.
Language:English
Score: 1703672 - https://www.who.int/news-room/...unicable-diseases-hypertension
Data Source: un