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Implementation of these policy instruments and the ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management, as well as associated measures and tools, is required to effectively address unsustainable and harmful fishing practices. (...) Improved management of fishing gear use and introduction of waste disposal systems for the disposal of unwanted fishing gear and promotion of the circular economy in recipient countries; iii. Reduced levels of discards and unwanted bycatch of non- target species, both fish and non- fish species, and endangered, threatened or protected (ETP) species globally including marine mammals; iv.
Language:English
Score: 1256825 - https://www.fao.org/3/ne659en/ne659en.pdf
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It is a global problem that requires a multifaceted, comprehensive approach that includes: effective legislation and enforcement, development of technical measures, establishment of industry partnerships and self-regulation, education, international cooperation. (...) What telecommunication network standardization work, if any, is needed to effectively counter spam as it relates to the stability and robustness of the telecommunication network? Tasks Tasks include, but are not limited to: Act as the lead group in ITU-T on technical means for countering spam, as spam is described by Study Group 2. Establish effective cooperation with the IETF, the relevant ITU study groups and appropriate consortia and fora, including private sector entities for this area.
Language:English
Score: 1254391 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/studygroups/com17/sg17-q5.html
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For example, a series of experiments can be run in which contraceptive effectiveness is varied. Such experiments can provide insights into the effects on fertility of different family planning programme strategies. (...) Widowhood . Contraceptive effectiveness .... Divorce . Remarriage from widowhood ..... (...) For family planning strategy IV, contraceptive effectiveness is raised to 99 per cent and no induced abortion is assumed, since the assumption is that it would' be unnecessary if con- traception were 99 per cent effective.
Language:English
Score: 1252415.5 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...fertility-programmes/chap7.pdf
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The patient gives consent in writing form, after sufficiently informed about the purpose, goal and way of process, expected results, potential risks, as well as about possible unwanted effects of examination and research (article 22). (...) Therefore, for example, medical examination and research can be done on juvenile patient or patient deprived of legal capacity, only for his/her direct benefit and with written consent of legal representative, i.e. custodian, who previously was informed about purpose, goal, way of process, expected results, possible risk, as well as about possible unwanted effects of examination and research. Finally, Article 19 of the Law on Patients' Rights stipulates that medical intervention against the will of the patient, legal representative or custodian of juvenile patient or patient deprived of legal capacity can only be undertaken in exceptional cases established by law and in accordance with medical standards and ethics. e) Euthanasia and assisted suicide In Montenegro euthanasia and assisted suicide is not recognized and legalized.
Language:English
Score: 1252364.9 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...abilities/NHRI_Montenegro.docx
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. • Fourthly, access to safe abortion services could reduce drastically the adverse outcomes, including death, experienced by the estimated 3.2 million teenage girls who have an unsafe abortion (half of whom live in Africa) because they had an unwanted pregnancy. • Unwanted pregnancies can be prevented by governments improving access to effective contraception among sexually active adolescents, married or unmarried; unmet need is currently very high, with over 50 percent of adolescents in many countries being sexually active but without using contraception. • Fifthly, unprotected sex can transmit sexually transmitted infections, including HIV; 2 million adolescents live with HIV and risk of HIV is 2.5 to 4 times higher among young women than young men. (...) Access to condoms and to comprehensive sexuality education, both of which are known to be effective in preventing sexual transmission of infections, is unfortunately limited and non-existent in many countries, yet their potential impact on health is enormous. • While increasing access to such services can effectively reduce these risks of disease and death among adolescents, coercive sex and other violence against young girls, including child, early or forced marriage and female genital mutilation, as well as other gender- based inequalities – in education, employment, and politics – will undo the hard-earned benefits from government investments in strengthening health services.
Language:English
Score: 1249179.9 - https://www.who.int/reproducti...Askew-address-IPU-Assembly.pdf
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Nuptiality / Marital fertility rates 2. Wanted / Unwanted fertility - Wanted: Limiting / Spacing - Unwanted: Non-use / Discontinuation / Failure 3. (...) Nuptiality / Marital fertility rates 2. Wanted / Unwanted fertility - Wanted: Limiting / Spacing - Unwanted: Unmet Need / Discontinuation / Failure 3. (...) Decomposing Fertility Differences Wanted or Unwanted Fertility? Wanted or Unwanted Fertility? Wanted Fertility: Limiting Wanted Fertility: Spacing Change in Unwanted Fertility: Sources Conclusion 2.
Language:English
Score: 1246822.8 - https://www.un.org/development...s/200912_unpd_egm_el_zeini.pdf
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Shrimp TEDs are highly effective, reducing turtle bycatch on average by 97%. (...) The TED which has been developed ensures that turtles are able to escape from the nets without having a negative effect on the catch of the targeted species such as weakfishes, grunts, snappers, etc. In addition, some unwanted bycatch is also excluded from the nets when using the TED, especially stingrays.
Language:English
Score: 1246134.3 - https://www.fao.org/in-action/...yc-2/news/detail/en/c/1277640/
Data Source: un
20130610 Harmful interference to satellite systems - ANFR views [Mode de compatibilité] 1 Harmful interference to satellite systems ANFR views International satellite communication workshop “The ITU - challenges in the 21st century: Preventing harmful interference to satellite systems” Geneva, 10 June 2013 2 Preventing harmful interference • One of the first and foremost aim of the ITU-R is to prevent harmful interference to occur: • ITU Constitution, Article 1, Nos.10, 11 and 12: • “To this end, the Union shall in particular: a) effect allocation of bands of the radio-frequency spectrum, the allotment of radio frequencies and the registration of radiofrequency assignments and, for space services, of any associated orbital position in the geostationary-satellite orbit or of any associated characteristics of satellites in other orbits, in order to avoid harmful interference between radio stations of different countries; b) coordinate efforts to eliminate harmful interference between radio stations of different countries and to improve the use made of the radio-frequency spectrum for radiocommunication services and of the geostationary-satellite and other satellite orbits” • Preamble of the Radio Regulations, Nos. 0.4 and 0.8: •“0.4 All stations, whatever their purpose, must be established and operated in such a manner as not to cause harmful interference to the radio services or communications of other Members or of recognized operating agencies, or of other duly authorized operating agencies which carry on a radio service, and which operate in accordance with the provisions of these Regulations (No. 197 of the Constitution).” •“0.8 to assist in the prevention and resolution of cases of harmful interference between the radio services of different administrations” • But the same provisions also emphasise the need to resolve the cases of actual harmful interference when they happen by eliminating the interference. 3 Harmful interference sometimes happens Case 1: SMOS (EESS satellite – 1400-1427 MHz) 4 Harmful interference sometimes happens Case 2: EUTELSAT HOT BIRD 13A (FSS satellite – Ku) Communication carrier Interfering unmodulated carrier 5 Types of interference • Unwanted emissions may interfere with passive sensors (like SMOS) • Resolution 750 (Rev.WRC-12) provides unwanted emissions levels aimed at ensuring compatibility between the Earth exploration-satellite service (passive) and adjacent or nearby active services • In-band emissions are also potential sources of interference to satellite systems: • Interference internal to the satellite network (equipment and cabling faults, poor quality transmission equipment, human error settings of polarisation and frequency or accessing at incorrect times). • Outside of the scope of the Radio Regulations (solved internally by satellite operators) • Interference external to the satellite system • Adjacent satellite interference : either errors (e.g. antenna mispointing) or lack of coordination (procedures of Articles 9 and 11 (and of Appendices 30, 30A and 30B) are designed to minimise the latter case). • Unauthorized access to the satellite : carriers (with content) are transmitted towards a satellite without any prior contract/authorisation is put in place with the satellite operator (e.g. piracy) • Intentional jamming of satellite signals : carriers (often unmodulated) are transmitted towards a satellite with the intent to prevent the current signals to be transmitted. (...) • Harmful interference affecting satellite network does not result from a lack of regulation but from a need for better enforcement of the existing provisions: • Unwanted emissions: studies have been done in ITU-R, results are available, a WRC Resolution (750) is contained in the Radio Regulations let’s implement them in designing new active systems or retrofitting existing ones !
Language:English
Score: 1239663 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-R/s...xandre%20Vallet%20-%20ANFR.pdf
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.; • Shouting and aggressive behavior; • Using a person as the constant or repeated target of jokes; • Derogatory or offensive nicknames; • Innuendo or other suggestive, offensive or derogatory comments or jokes about a person’s gender identity or sexual orientation; • Unwanted and/or demeaning comments on dress, appearance, or physical characteristics; • Slandering or maligning another person’s reputation by gossip, rumour and ridicule; • Persistently making unwarranted critical or patronizing remarks in front of others or ‘behind a person’s back’; • Unwarranted, intrusive or persistent questioning about a person's ethnic or racial origin including their culture or religion; • Repeated and unwanted notes, messages or calls; • Notes, messages or calls that are abusive, threaten, insult, attempt to coerce, humiliate or intimidate; • Leaving an abusive, insulting or threatening message in workspaces; • Putting pressure on a person to participate in political or religious discussions of groups; • Suggestive remarks about a person’s clothing, body, hairstyle, appearance or any aspect of their person or personal possessions. (...) Examples of physical harassment include: • Unwanted, uninvited or inappropriate touching, patting, hugging or other physical contact (e.g. massaging a person without invitation or deliberately brushing up against them); • Punching, hitting, pushing, slapping, kicking, or biting another person. • Tripping another person; • Throwing an object at another person or attacking a person with an object. (...) Examples of sexual harassment include: • Repeated requests or other forms of pressure for a sexual or other personal — rather than professional — relationship (e.g. repeated requests for ‘a date’); • Unwarranted, intrusive or persistent questioning about a person's marital status or sexual interests, history or orientation; • Obscene messages sent by text message, email, video chat, social media platform or left on an answering machine or voice mail; • Open or implied threat that submission to sexual advances will be a condition of some form of commendation, work status or access to promotion or development opportunity or positive performance evaluation; • Remarks speculating about a person’s sexual activities or history, or remarks about one's own sexual activities or history; • Displays of material of a sexual nature (including pornography) including posters, pinups, cartoons, graffiti, objects, or messages left on notice boards, desks or common areas; • A pattern of conduct, which can be subtle in nature, that has sexual overtones and is intended to create or has the effect of creating distress and/or humiliation in another person; • Using unwelcome ‘pet’ names, such as “honey”, “doll”, “babe”, “princess”, etc.; • Innuendo or other suggestive, offensive or derogatory comments or jokes about a person’s gender identity or sexual orientation; • Unwanted, uninvited or inappropriate touching, patting, hugging or other physical contact (e.g. massaging a person without invitation or deliberately brushing up against them).
Language:English
Score: 1232472.8 - https://www.undp.org/sites/g/f...339399db72b3775a9e61613214.pdf
Data Source: un
Radio Interference Committed to connecting the world عربي 中文 Español Français Русский Search for: ITU About ITU Media Centre Events Publications Statistics Areas of Action Regional Presence Careers General Secretariat Radiocommunication Standardization Development ITU Telecom Members' Zone Join ITU Radio Interference Rollup Image You are here ITU > Home > mediacentre > Backgrounders > Radio Interference Share Page Content 10 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ ​​ ​​ Overview Page Content 2 Radio interference is defined by provision No. 1.166 of the ITU Radio Regulations as “the effect of unwanted energy due to one or a combination of emissions, radiations, or inductions upon reception in a radiocommunication system, manifested by any performance degradation, misinterpretation or loss of information which could be extracted in the absence of such unwanted energy". (...) Radio Interference Page Content 3 ​ Radio interference is defined by No. 1.166 of the ITU Radio Regulations (RR) as "the effect of unwanted energy due to one or a combination of emissions, radiations, or inductions upon reception in a radiocommunication system, manifested by any performance degradation, misinterpretation or loss of information which could be extracted in the absence of such unwanted energy".    (...) Harmful interference can have both short-term consequences (in degradation of service etc.) or long-term effects (jeopardizing dependent services or incentives for future investments). 
Language:English
Score: 1230770.5 - https://www.itu.int/en/mediace.../Pages/radio-interference.aspx
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