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Here Joke gives an account of her volunteer contributions in Tanzania: "How do you equip youth with the necessary skills to avoid unwanted sex? What factors lead to risky sexual behaviour? (...) An emphasis on both abstinence and use of protection for those who are already sexually active is not confusing to young people, but rather, can be realistic and effective. Attendees exchanged many eye opening experiences during coffee breaks. (...) There, youth can pull out a red card named ‘aoka aloha’ whenever they find themselves in a situation where they feel forced to have unwanted sexual contact. Discussions on gender equality revealed different perspectives on power relations between men and women and uncovered gender norms.
Language:English
Score: 1155744.2 - https://www.unv.org/news/train...ducation-and-youth-development
Data Source: un
Here Joke gives an account of her volunteer contributions in Tanzania: "How do you equip youth with the necessary skills to avoid unwanted sex? What factors lead to risky sexual behaviour? (...) An emphasis on both abstinence and use of protection for those who are already sexually active is not confusing to young people, but rather, can be realistic and effective. Attendees exchanged many eye opening experiences during coffee breaks. (...) There, youth can pull out a red card named ‘aoka aloha’ whenever they find themselves in a situation where they feel forced to have unwanted sexual contact. Discussions on gender equality revealed different perspectives on power relations between men and women and uncovered gender norms.
Language:English
Score: 1155744.2 - https://www.unv.org/index.php/node/15305
Data Source: un
Here Joke gives an account of her volunteer contributions in Tanzania: "How do you equip youth with the necessary skills to avoid unwanted sex? What factors lead to risky sexual behaviour? (...) An emphasis on both abstinence and use of protection for those who are already sexually active is not confusing to young people, but rather, can be realistic and effective. Attendees exchanged many eye opening experiences during coffee breaks. (...) There, youth can pull out a red card named ‘aoka aloha’ whenever they find themselves in a situation where they feel forced to have unwanted sexual contact. Discussions on gender equality revealed different perspectives on power relations between men and women and uncovered gender norms.
Language:English
Score: 1155744.2 - https://www.unv.org/index.php/...ducation-and-youth-development
Data Source: un
Here Joke gives an account of her volunteer contributions in Tanzania: "How do you equip youth with the necessary skills to avoid unwanted sex? What factors lead to risky sexual behaviour? (...) An emphasis on both abstinence and use of protection for those who are already sexually active is not confusing to young people, but rather, can be realistic and effective. Attendees exchanged many eye opening experiences during coffee breaks. (...) There, youth can pull out a red card named ‘aoka aloha’ whenever they find themselves in a situation where they feel forced to have unwanted sexual contact. Discussions on gender equality revealed different perspectives on power relations between men and women and uncovered gender norms.
Language:English
Score: 1155744.2 - https://www.unv.org/node/15305
Data Source: un
They should make every effort to prevent harassment from occurring, as well as to take effective and prompt protective measures once the director or supervisor becomes aware of the harassment, to ensure that behaviour of this type ceases immediately. 3. (...) It is essential to emphasize that sexual harassment refers to conduct which is unwanted and unwelcome to the recipient. As this is the key factor that distinguishes it from friendly, flirtatious or other relations that are freely and mutually entered into, it is important that a person who believes that she or he is the victim of sexual harassment clearly communicates this (either directly or through a third party) to the official engaging in the unwanted and unwelcome behaviour. 6. Some examples of physical conduct of a sexual nature, which, if unwanted and unwelcome, may constitute sexual harassment include touching, patting, pinching or any other unsolicited physical contact.
Language:English
Score: 1154952.3 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/...cular_on_Sexual_Harassment.pdf
Data Source: un
Unwanted emissions radiated from and received by stations of the science services Committed to connecting the world عربي 中文 Español Français Русский Sign In Search for: ITU About ITU Media Centre Events Publications Statistics Areas of Action Regional Presence Careers General Secretariat Radiocommunication Standardization Development ITU Telecom Members' Zone Join ITU You are here ITU > Home > ITU Publications > Radiocommunication (ITU-R) > publications Share Unwanted emissions radiated from and received by stations of the science services Shopping cart You are here Home > ITU Publications > Radiocommunication (ITU-R) > ITU-R Questions > Science services > Unwanted emissions radiated from and received by stations of the science services Share Question SG07.129 Managed by SG07 Main Number Title Status 129-3/7   Unwanted emissions radiated from and received by stations of the science services   In force (Main)     Previous versions Number Title Status 129-2/7   Unwanted emissions radiated from and received by stations of the science services   Superseded QUICK LINKS Search publications New releases Featured Publication Notices Publication Catalogue Accessible publications Publications by Sector General Secretariat and ITU Telecom General Secretariat and Telecom General Conference Publications Policy and Market Analysis Terminology ITU TELECOM Publications ITU Journal on Future and Evolving Technologies ITU Journal: ICT Discoveries Radiocommunication (ITU-R) Radiocommunication (ITU-R) General Publications Regulatory Publications Conference Publications ITU-R Questions ITU-R Resolutions Service Publications ITU-R Recommendations ITU-R Reports Handbooks ITU-R Opinions Software and Databases Terminology Standardization (ITU-T) Standardization (ITU-T) General Regulations Resolutions and Opinions ITU-T Recommendations Service Publications Handbooks Proceedings Test charts Technical papers and tutorials Terminology Development (ITU-D) Development (ITU-D) General Publications on ICT Regulation, Economics and Finance Statistics and Indicators Study Groups Conference Publications Innovation Operators Least Developed Countries Handbooks E-Strategies Publications on human and institutional capacity building and digital inclusion Technology and Network Development   Further Information ITU Souvenirs ITU Resellers Conditions of sale FAQ Contact Follow us Twitter Facebook YouTube Flickr Linkedin Instagram Soundcloud Podcasts Spotify Spreaker TikTok © ITU All Rights Reserved Contact us Privacy notice Accessibility Report misconduct Back to top
Language:English
Score: 1153181.2 - https://www.itu.int/pub/R-QUE-SG07.129
Data Source: un
Fertility Prospects in the Arab Region UN / December 2009 12 Fertility Desires Will examine: • Wanted and unwanted TFRs • Ideal number of children • Parity- and age-specific preferences UN / December 2009 13 33 23 25 21 27 25 33 30 0 10 20 30 40 Yemen (2003) Syria (2001) Lebanon (2004) Jordan (2007) Egypt (2008) Tunisia (2001) Morocco (2003) Algeria (2002) Percent Unwanted Note: Aggregate Prospective estimates, births during 36 months before survey Figure 3: Percentage of Births Unw anted UN / December 2009 14 2.4 1.0 0.5 0.9 1.0 0.6 0.9 0.8 0 .5 1 1.5 2 Yemen (2003) Syria (2001) Lebanon (2004) Jordan (2007) Egypt (2008) Tunisia (2001) Morocco (2003) Algeria (2002) Unwanted Births per Woman Note: Aggregate Prospective estimates, births during 36 months before survey Figure 4: Unw anted Total Fertility Rate UN / December 2009 15 3.4 5.8 2.7 3.7 1.3 1.7 2.7 3.6 2.1 3.0 1.5 2.1 1.6 2.5 1.5 2.2 0 1 2 3 4 Yemen (2003) Syria (2001) Lebanon (2004) Jordan (2007) Egypt (2008) Tunisia (2001) Morocco (2003) Algeria (2002) Births per Woman Note: Aggregate Prospective estimates, 36 months before survey Figure 5: Total Fertility Rate and Components Wanted Unwanted UN / December 2009 16 4.1 4.3 3.1 3.7 2.7 2.8 2.7 3.4 0 1 2 3 4 Yemen Syria Lebanon Jordan Egypt Tunisia Morocco Algeria Mean Ideal Number Note: among women who provide a numeric ideal Figure 6: Ideal Number of Children, Women Age 20-29 UN / December 2009 17 3 0 3 4 2 4 4 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 Yemen Syria Lebanon Jordan Egypt Tunisia Morocco Algeria Percentage Ideal Number = 0 or 1 Note: among women who provide a numeric ideal Figure 7a: Ideal Children = 0 or 1, Women Age 20-29 UN / December 2009 18 76 88 66 77 47 52 45 69 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Yemen Syria Lebanon Jordan Egypt Tunisia Morocco Algeria Percentage Ideal Number = 3+ Note: among women who provide a numeric ideal Figure 7b: Ideal Children = 3+, Women Age 20-29 UN / December 2009 19 16 24 46 22 59 43 42 26 0 20 40 60 80 Yemen Syria Lebanon Jordan Egypt Tunisia Morocco Algeria Percent Not Wanting Source: DHS and PAPFAM survey data Figure 8a: Percentage Not Wanting Another Birth, Parity 2 UN / December 2009 20 28 47 68 38 86 65 62 46 0 20 40 60 80 Yemen Syria Lebanon Jordan Egypt Tunisia Morocco Algeria Percent Not Wanting Source: DHS and PAPFAM survey data Figure 8b: Percentage Not Wanting Another Birth, Parity 3 Fertility Prospects in the Arab Region UN / December 2009 21 Fertility Desires: summary • Moderately high unwanted fertility provides potential for further fertility decline but . . . • Ideals -- lack of attachment to small-family (two children) • Preferences – less than one-half wish to stop at: - Two children - Ages 25 - 34 Fertility Prospects in the Arab Region UN / December 2009 22 Birth Control At issue is acceptability of means for effective termination of childbearing after a small number of children (e.g. two children) • Sterilization • Induced abortion Neither method of birth control is commonly employed at present And many reasons to assume this will continue to be the case . . . 23 0 20 40 60 80 100 Djibouti (2002) Comoros (1996) Yemen (2003) U.A.E. (1995) Saudi Arabia (1996) Qatar (1998) Oman (1995) Kuwait (1996) Syria (2001) Lebanon (2004) Jordan (2007) Egypt (2008) Tunisia (2001) Morocco (2003) Algeria (2002) Percentage Source: DHS, PAPFAM, and Gulf Family Health surveys Figure 9: Contraceptive Method Distribution sterilization iud pill traditional else Fertility Prospects in the Arab Region UN / December 2009 24 Concluding Comments Significant, and possibly robust, factors acting against the achievement of low fertility in the short-term in the Arab region: • Two-child norm is not firmly and widely established • Neither sterilization nor induced abortion are generally available as methods of birth control Arguing to the contrary – sharp changes in nuptiality, and the potential for further such change.
Language:English
Score: 1150512.3 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...pdf/expert/15.5/Casterline.pdf
Data Source: un
This increase is a temporary effect of the integration of women in the workforce. (...) The studies examined have used different ways of coping with this complicating factor. 12 * Unwanted sexual behaviour The first category of studies asked about unwanted actual behaviour, without mentioning sexual harassment (almost half of the studies). (...) First, almost all researchers used the term “unwanted” in their lists of behaviour. The other terms “improper or offensive” were not referred to.
Language:English
Score: 1150224.8 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/osagi/pdf/shworkpl.pdf
Data Source: un
G.229 : Unwanted modulation and phase jitter   Français   Español     Home : ITU-T : Publications : Recommendations : G Series : G.229 Recently posted  -  Search Recommendations     G.229 : Unwanted modulation and phase jitter Recommendation G.229 In force components Number Title Status G.229 (11/88)   Unwanted modulation and phase jitter   In force   Top  -  Feedback  -  Contact us  -  Copyright © ITU  2008 All Rights Reserved Contact for this page :  ITU-T Publications Updated : 2003/02/10  
Language:English
Score: 1144095.3 - https://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-G.229
Data Source: un
People exposed to pesticides may suffer short-term acute health effects such as nausea, headaches, sore eyes, skin rashes and dizziness. (...) Such stockpiles may not be designated as hazardous waste, but may be industrial by-products, unwanted chemicals or pure chemicals for use in industrial processes. (...) Unwanted pesticides and older and more hazardous pesticides make up a high proportion of obsolete pesticide stockpiles.
Language:English
Score: 1140802.9 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...sticides/Guidelines/Y2566E.pdf
Data Source: un