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Thousands of children die every year because of lack of vitamin A. The first signs of vitamin A deficiency are night blindness, dry eyes and eye infections. Vitamin A can be found in a variety of animal and plant foods Animal foods that have plenty of vitamin A: ° Liver and kidney ° Eggs and milk ° Butter and cheese ° Whole dried fish (including liver) The body can easily use vitamin A from animal foods. (...) For babies under 6 months the best source of vitamin A is breast milk, if the mother has enough vitamin A.
Language:English
Score: 1069960 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...keeps_our_bodies_healthy_6.pdf
Data Source: un
Vitamins | Nutrition | Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO.org english français Español Nutrition Nutrition assessment Policies and programmes Education Markets Capacity development Dietary Energy Proteins Carbohydrates Dietary Fats Vitamins Minerals Document Archive Vitamins Vitamins are organic substances found in plant and animal foods. (...) Vitamins that are important for human health include Vitamin A, Vitamin D. Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Vitamin C, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenate and Biotin.
Language:English
Score: 1062880.6 - https://www.fao.org/nutrition/requirements/vitamins/en/
Data Source: un
Dadu2x2 Vitamin D Vitamin E Vitamin K KALIUM FOLAT NATRIUM Kalsium Magnesium FOSFOR SENG BESI IODIUM Vitamin B1 Vitamin B2 Vitamin B3 Vitamin B5 Vitamin B6 Vitamin B12
Language:English
Score: 1058870.2 - https://www.unicef.org/indonesia/id/media/8816/file
Data Source: un
Vitamines | Nutrition | Organisation des Nations Unies pour l'alimentation et l'agriculture FAO.org english français Español Nutrition Évaluation nutritionnelle Politiques et programmes Éducation Marchés Renforcement des capacités Energétiques alimentaires Protéines Glucides Matières grasses alimentaires Vitamines Minéraux Archive Vitamines Les vitamines sont des composés organiques qui se trouvent dans les aliments d’origine animale ou végétale. De petites quantités de vitamines sont essentielles à une croissance corporelle normale et à l’activité physiologique. Les vitamines importantes pour la santé humaine incluent la vitamine A, la vitamine D, la vitamine E, la vitamine K, la vitamine C, la thiamine, la riboflavine, la niacine, la vitamine B6, le folate, la vitamine B12, le pantothenate et la biotine.
Language:English
Score: 1057614.2 - https://www.fao.org/nutrition/requirements/vitamines/fr/
Data Source: un
Technical Bulletin No.18 (November 2013) PORTABLE EQUIPMENT FOR QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF VITAMINS AND MINERALS IN FORTIFIED FOODS Background: Foods are a major source of nutrients, including vitamins and minerals. (...) Food fortification consists of adding vitamins and minerals (e.g. iodine, iron or vitamin A) to widely and frequently consumed staple foods like salt, flour, oil or sugar. (...) It takes less than 10 minutes to determine vitamin A and iodine levels and about 30-60 minutes to determine iron levels in foods.
Language:English
Score: 1055708.7 - https://www.unicef.org/supply/...s-Minerals-Fortified-Foods.pdf
Data Source: un
0 Vitamin A Supplementation: Market and Supply Update UNICEF Supply Division June 2018 1 Vitamin A Supplementation Market and Supply Update – June 2018 1. (...) UNICEF procures vitamin A mostly as retinol, which is the animal form of vitamin A, with a minimum shelf-life of 24 months. (...) The trend in WAP reflects the impact of vitamin A API on the world market price, as most vitamin A API is destined for other uses in human and animal nutrition.
Language:English
Score: 1054202.5 - https://www.unicef.org/supply/...n-market-and-supply-update.pdf
Data Source: un
Global Food Losses and Food Waste Report1 and FAOSTAT’s food balance sheets2 were used to estimate volumes of FLW in 7 world regions Vitamins A and C contents in fruits and vegetables were determined using the USDA3 National Nutrient Database. (...) Results Methods • IA had the highest per capita vitamins A and C in FLW in fruit and vegetables (vitamin A: 784 R/day and vitamin C: 90 mg/day), the lowest were found in SSA (vitamin A: 135 RE/day; vitamin C: 26 mg/day) [FIG.1 and FIG.2]. • Globally, harvest, post-harvest and consumption accounted for the majority of vitamins FLW along the food supply chains, processing accounted for the lowest FLW. • Agricultural production in IA and NAO had the highest vitamins A and C FLW respectively (Vitamin A: 228 RE/d; vitamin C 33mg/d). • IA was also the lead region globally with the highest vitamin A FLW among fruits and vegetables across the food supply chain apart from processing. • For vitamins A and C waste in fruit and vegetables at consumer end, IA produced the highest waste, while the lowest was in SSA [FIG.3 and FIG.4]. (...) FIG. 1 Total per capita losses and waste of vitamin C (mg/day) from fruit and vegetables across the 7 FAO regions FIG. 2 Total per capita losses and waste of vitamin A (RE/day) from fruit and vegetables in the 7 FAO regions FIG. 3 Vitamin C (mg/day) in fruit and vegetables losses and waste from the food supply chain across the 7 FAO regions FIG. 4 Vitamin A content (RE/day) in fruit and vegetables losses and waste from the food supply chain across the 7 FAO regions Conclusions Objectives
Language:English
Score: 1053991.5 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...er_1st_PHL_Congress_201510.pdf
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Over 140 million children at greater risk of illness as they miss life-saving vitamin A supplements UNICEF urges immediate action as vitamin A coverage declines alarmingly, most starkly in West and Central Africa 02 May 2018 UNICEF/UN048391/Pirozzi A girl receives a dose of vitamin A at a basic health centre in Khan Pur Baga Sher Village, in Muzaffargarh District in Punjab Province. (...) But in 26 countries with the highest rates of child mortality – where vitamin A supplementation programmes are needed most – 62 million children missed vitamin A supplements in 2016, triple the number missed in 2015.    (...) At the same time, the report notes that until children have access to nutritious and safe diets that protect them from vitamin A deficiency, vitamin A supplementation programmes remain essential in many countries.  
Language:English
Score: 1047654.7 - https://www.unicef.org/turkey/en/node/2531
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Over 140 million children at greater risk of illness as they miss life-saving vitamin A supplements UNICEF urges immediate action as vitamin A coverage declines alarmingly, most starkly in West and Central Africa 02 May 2018 UNICEF/UN048391/Pirozzi A girl receives a dose of vitamin A at a basic health centre in Khan Pur Baga Sher Village, in Muzaffargarh District in Punjab Province. (...) But in 26 countries with the highest rates of child mortality – where vitamin A supplementation programmes are needed most – 62 million children missed vitamin A supplements in 2016, triple the number missed in 2015.    (...) At the same time, the report notes that until children have access to nutritious and safe diets that protect them from vitamin A deficiency, vitamin A supplementation programmes remain essential in many countries.  
Language:English
Score: 1047654.7 - https://www.unicef.org/turkiye/en/node/2531
Data Source: un
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Macronutrients are consumed in relatively large quantities and include proteins, carbohydrates, and fats and fatty acids. Micronutrients – vitamins and minerals – are consumed in relatively smaller quantities, but are essential to body processes. Carbohydrates Fibre Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Sugars Reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity Reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages to reduce the risk of unhealthy weight gain in adults Reducing free sugars intake in adults to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Reducing free sugars intake in children to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Fats and fatty acids Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy Protein Balanced energy and protein supplementation during pregnancy Vitamins and minerals Calcium Calcium supplementation during pregnancy to reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia Folate Daily iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy Daily iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls in malaria-endemic areas Iron supplementation with or without folic acid to reduce the risk of postpartum anaemia Iron supplementation with or without folic acid to reduce the risk of postpartum anaemia in malaria-endemic areas Periconceptional folic acid supplementation to prevent neural tube defects Iodine Iodine supplementation in pregnant and lactating women Iodization of salt for the prevention and control of iodine deficiency disorders Iron Daily iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy Daily iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy in malaria-endemic areas Daily iron supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls Daily iron supplementation in children 24–59 months of age Daily iron supplementation in children 24–59 months of age in malaria-endemic areas Daily iron supplementation in children 6-23 months of age Daily iron supplementation in children 6-23 months of age in malaria-endemic areas Daily iron supplementation in children and adolescents 5–12 years of age Daily iron supplementation in children and adolescents 5–12 years of age in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls Intermittent iron and folic acid supplementation in adult women and adolescent girls in malaria-endemic areas Intermittent iron supplementation in preschool and school-age children Intermittent iron supplementation in preschool and school-age children in malaria-endemic areas Iron supplementation with or without folic acid to reduce the risk of postpartum anaemia Iron supplementation with or without folic acid to reduce the risk of postpartum anaemia in malaria-endemic areas Potassium Increasing potassium intake to control blood pressure in children Increasing potassium intake to reduce blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular diseases in adults Sodium Iodization of salt for the prevention and control of iodine deficiency disorders Reducing sodium intake to control blood pressure in children Reducing sodium intake to reduce blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular diseases in adults Vitamin A Vitamin A fortification of staple foods Vitamin A supplementation during pregnancy Vitamin A supplementation in children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Vitamin A supplementation in children with respiratory infections Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected adults Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected infants and children 6–59 months of age Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected women during pregnancy Vitamin A supplementation in infants 1–5 months of age Vitamin A supplementation in infants and children 6–59 months of age Vitamin A supplementation in neonates Vitamin A supplementation in postpartum women Vitamin B6 Vitamin B6 supplementation during pregnancy Vitamin C Vitamin E and C supplementation during pregnancy Vitamin D Vitamin D supplementation and respiratory infections in children Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy Vitamin D supplementation in infants Vitamin E Vitamin E and C supplementation during pregnancy Vitamin E supplementation for the prevention of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants Zinc Zinc supplementation and growth in children Zinc supplementation during pregnancy Zinc supplementation in children with respiratory infections Zinc supplementation in the management of diarrhoea Micronutrients Biofortification of staple crops Fortification of maize flour and corn meal Fortification of rice Fortification of wheat flour Micronutrient intake in children with severe acute malnutrition Micronutrient supplementation in HIV-infected women during pregnancy Micronutrient supplementation in individuals with active tuberculosis Micronutrient supplementation in low-birth-weight and very-low-birth-weight infants Multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by children 2-12 years of age Multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by children 6–23 months of age Multiple micronutrient powders for point-of-use fortification of foods consumed by pregnant women Multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy Water Water, sanitation and hygiene interventions to prevent diarrhoea Multiple nutrients Balanced energy and protein supplementation during pregnancy Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases Macronutrient supplementation in people living with HIV/AIDS Supplemental nutrition with dietary advice for older people affected by undernutrition Supplementary feeding in community settings for promoting child growth Supplementary foods for the management of moderate acute malnutrition in children aged 6 - 59 months Therapeutic feeding of children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition and acute or persistent diarrhoea Transition feeding of children 6–59 months of age with severe acute malnutrition Contact us eLENA team Department of Nutrition for Health and Development (NHD) World Health Organization 20 Avenue Appia CH-1211 Geneva 27 Switzerland E-mail: [email protected] WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development You are here: e-Library of Evidence for Nutrition Actions (eLENA) Nutrients Regions Africa Americas Eastern Mediterranean Europe South-East Asia Western Pacific About us Careers Library Procurement Publications Frequently asked questions Contact us Subscribe to our newsletters Privacy Legal Notice © 2022 WHO
Language:English
Score: 1047084.2 - https://www.who.int/elena/nutrient/en/
Data Source: un