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Nutrient Reference values for Vitamin A used in the Nutrition/Dietary adequacy section were used after: Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc.
Language:English
Score: 950990.3 - https://www.fao.org/gift-indiv...ion/methodology/indicators/en/
Data Source: un
Nutrient Reference values for Vitamin A used in the Nutrition/Dietary adequacy section were used after: Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc.
Language:English
Score: 950990.3 - https://www.fao.org/gift-indiv...od-consumption/methodology/zh/
Data Source: un
This high coverage has been attained through bi-annual Vitamin A campaigns for children 6-59 months. High dose (200000 IU/100,000 IU) vitamin A capsule are distributed among 6-59 months children during the national vitamin A campaign. Children aged 6-11 months will be provided with Vitamin A capsules (100000 IU) during vitamin A campaign. Vitamin A capsule is also given therapeutically to the children suffering from vitamin A deficiency (night blindness).
Language:English
Score: 950015.5 - https://www.unicef.org/banglad...18-10/NNS%20OP%202011-2016.pdf
Data Source: un
Dietary diversity is poor,  with low levels of protein and vitamins. •Overweight in adulthood represents a very significant public health problem, with 81.5% of people overweight  38 31 42 0 20 40 60 80 100 Pregnant women Non ‐ pregnant women of reproductive age Children <5 years Total <2 yr Prevalence of Anaemia (%) 2301 2645 286 3782587 3022 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 1990 2011 K ca l p e r  p e rs o n  p e r  d ay Animal Origin Vegetal Origin Total Dietary Energy Supply (DES) Figure 1.1 Food Availability     From 1990 to 2011:  •DES increased 17%  •Animal‐origin supply  increased 32%  •Vegetal‐origin products  increased 15% and  remained the major DES  source 68.2 53.6 48.2 46.3 28.7 24.1 22.2 21.6 94.1 71.1 62.8 59.9 31 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 5 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 5 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 2 2 0 1 5 Infant Neonatal Under fives Kiribati ‐ Food and Nutrition Security Profiles Figure 1.5 Anaemia  • Anaemia is a serious public health issue, high among  pregnant women (38%) and non‐pregnant women  (31%) and severe among under‐5 children (42%)  • Deworming and iron supplementation can be  effective for reducing anaemia in pregnant women as  well as children.  (...) •Disparities in access between urban and rural  areas have remained almost unchanged; , only  half of the rural population has access to improved water sources WHO‐UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme, 2014 WHO‐UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme, 2014 WHO‐UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme, 2014 *Optimal UIE 100 ‐ 199ug/L Micronutrient Status Iodine (Table 3.2) Food Utilization ‐Households consuming iodized salt  Iodine deficiency (Urinary Iodine Concentration <100ug/L)  among  school‐age children  Source: ‐ Nutrition and Health 0 21.8 0 25 50 75 100 P e rc e n t Vitamin A Supplementation  Coverage ‐ full – children 6‐59  months Vitamin A Deficiency  (Pre‐School Aged Children) <0.7umoL /a 36 53 59 68 0 20 40 60 80 Minimum acceptable diet (breastfed… Minimum meal frequency (breastfed… Minimum dietary diversity (breastfed… Introduction of solid, semi‐solid or… Percent Source:  Figure 3.6 Complementary Feeding  • Introduction of complementary feeding is timely for 68% of  children  • Complementary feeding practices deserve ongoing attention: 47%  of children aged 6‐23 months do not meet the minimum meal  frequency, 41% do not meet minimum dietary diversity, and 64% do  not receive the minimum acceptable diet  80 69 0 20 40 60 80 100 2009 P e rc e n t Early initiation of breastfeeding Exclusive breast feeding rate (0‐5 months) Source:  Figure 3.5 Exclusive Breastfeeding  • Exclusive breastfeeding stood at 69% in 2009 and early initiation at 80 %,  some of the highest rates in the region for these indicators Figure 3.7  Duration of Breastfeeding No Data Kiribati ‐ Food and Nutrition Security Profiles Figure 3.8 Child Malnutrition and Poverty   Figure 3.9 Vitamin A   • Vitamin A deficiencies represents a severe public health concern  (22% of pre‐schoolers)  Source: a/  WHO Global prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in population at risk  1995‐2005 report. * VAD is a severe public health problem if >20% of preschool children (6‐71  months) have low serum retinol (<0.7µmol/L) No Data KIR_Kiribati Demographic and Health Survey 2009_2010 KIR_Kiribati Demographic and Health Survey 2009_2010 Policy Table ‐ 1 Enabling environment for Nutrition and Food security ‐ Policy documents addressing nutrition issues                    Nutrition related issues covered in these policies Covered Comments Maternal and Child  Undernutrition Child  undernutrition    Low Birth Weight   Maternal undernutrition   Obesity and diet related  NCDs Child obesity   Adult obesity Diet related NCDs   Infant and Young Child  Nutrition Breastfeeding    Complementary feeding   Int’l Code of Marketing of BMS   Vitamins and Minerals Supplementation: Vitamin A  children/women    Iron Folate  children/women   Zinc  children   Other vitamins & min child/women   Food fortification     Social Protection policies or legislation including food or nutrition component       Underlying and  contextual factors Food Safety     Food security     Food Aid   Nutrition and Infection   Gender   Maternal leave    Kiribati ‐ Food and Nutrition Security Profiles Source:  Education level of mothers of under‐fives: None (%) ‐ ‐ 1.1 % 2000 Policy Table ‐ 2 Life expectancy at birth (Years) /a Average annual population growth 75375351 2012 Proportion of population urbanised Number of children <5 years (thousand) GDP annual growth rate /c 2.8 % 2012 ‐ Women aged 20‐24 who gave birth before age 18 /d (%) 9 2008‐2012 Male 66 2012 Adolescent birth rate  (number of births per 1,000 adolescent girls aged 15‐19) /a 39 2005 Adolescent girls aged 15‐19 currently married or in union /d 15.8 % 2005‐2012 Female Adolescents  (Table ‐ 5.2) 2.8 % 2000 71.4 2012 Agriculture population density(people/ ha of arable land /b) Employment in agriculture sector (% of total employment) /c Women employed in agriculture sector  (% of  total female employment) /c) Year 0.7 2006‐2008 2012 Population below US $ 1.25  (PPP) per day /c (%) ‐ ‐ The information inlcuded in this Food Security and Nutrition profile, is backed by recognized, validated and properlty published information available untill  June 2014. 
Language:English
Score: 949801.6 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/..._Profile_-_Kiribati_280714.pdf
Data Source: un
Figure 3.4 Diarrhoea Figure 3.2 Open Defecation  From 1990 to 2012: • Open defecation has not been an issue for  more than 20 years Figure 3.3 Access to Improved Water Sources   From 1990 to 2012: •Disparities in access to improved water  sources between urban and rural areas have  been solved  • At least 98% of people have sustainable  access to improved water sources WHO‐UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme, 2014 WHO‐UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme, 2014 WHO‐UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme, 2014 *Optimal UIE 100 ‐ 199ug/L Source: a/ WHO Global database on idodine deficiency, b/UNICEF State of the World’s Children ‐ Nutrition and Health Iodine deficiency (Urinary Iodine Concentration <100ug/L)  among  school‐age children  ‐ Micronutrient Status Iodine (Table 3.2) Food Utilization Households consuming iodized salt  48 55 78 85 0 20 40 60 80 100 Minimum acceptable diet (breastfed children 6‐23 months) Minimum meal frequency (breastfed children 6‐23 months) Minimum dietary diversity (breastfed children 6‐23 months) Introduction of solid, semi‐solid or soft food (breastfed children… Percent Source:  Figure 3.6 Complementary Feeding  • Introduction of complementary feeding is timely for 85% of children  • 45% of children aged 6‐23 months do not meet the minimum meal  frequency • Meeting the recommended quality of diet remains a challenge, with  only 48% achieving the minimum acceptable diet WSM_DHS_2009‐2010 16.1 0 25 50 75 100 P e rc e n t Vitamin A Supplementation  Coverage ‐ full – children 6‐59  months Vitamin A Deficiency  (Pre‐School Aged Children) <0.7umoL /a 88 51 0 20 40 60 80 100 2009 P e rc e n t Early initiation of breastfeeding Exclusive breast feeding rate (0‐5 months) Source:  Figure 3.5 Exclusive Breastfeeding   • Exclusive breastfeeding is 51% and early initiation of breastfeeding is  prevalent for 88% of children Figure 3.7  Duration of Breastfeeding Samoa ‐ Food and Nutrition Security Profiles Figure 3.8 Child Malnutrition and Poverty   Figure 3.9 Vitamin A   •Vitamin A deficiencies (16% of pre‐schoolers) indicate that Vitamin  A is lacking in the daily diet.  (...) Source: a/  WHO Global prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in population at risk  1995‐2005 report. * VAD is a severe public health problem if >20% of preschool children (6‐71  months) have low serum retinol (<0.7µmol/L) No Data WSM_DHS_2009‐2010 No Data Policy Table ‐ 1 Enabling environment for Nutrition and Food security ‐ Policy documents addressing nutrition issues                    Nutrition related issues covered in these policies Covered Comments Maternal and Child  Undernutrition Child  undernutrition    Low Birth Weight   Maternal undernutrition   Obesity and diet related  NCDs Child obesity   Adult obesity Diet related NCDs   Infant and Young Child  Nutrition Breastfeeding    Complementary feeding   Int’l Code of Marketing of BMS   Vitamins and Minerals Supplementation: Vitamin A  children/women    Iron Folate  children/women   Zinc  children   Other vitamins & min child/women   Food fortification     Social Protection policies or legislation including food or nutrition component       Underlying and  contextual factors Food Safety     Food security     Food Aid   Nutrition and Infection   Gender   Maternal leave    Samoa ‐ Food and Nutrition Security Profiles Source:  The information inlcuded in this Food Security and Nutrition profile, is backed by recognized, validated and properlty published information available untill  June 2014. 
Language:English
Score: 949801.6 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/.../DI_Profile_-_Samoa_280714.pdf
Data Source: un
Stunting, wasting, vitamin and mineral deficiencies are major issues affecting the health and wellbeing of children in Tajikistan. (...) Thirty-seven per cent of children suffer Vitamin A deficiency and 12 per cent vitamin D deficiency.  (...) UNICEF and other development partners ensure the availability of vitamin A, iron, folic acid, sprinkles and therapeutic food at health facilities.
Language:English
Score: 947359.9 - https://www.unicef.org/tajikistan/nutrition
Data Source: un
SUMMARY OF MIDTERM REVIEWS AND MAJOR EVALUATIONS OF COUNTRY PROGRAMMES : SOUTH ASIA REGION
Major evaluations of country programmes Assessment of the vitamin C supplementation programme, Afghanistan 35. (...) Information was collected through a questionnaire to assess the presence of scurvy, the use and acceptability of vitamin C tablets, access to vitamin C-rich foods and knowledge of scurvy. (...) Investigating the potential of promoting the daily consumption of about five grams of raw germinated wheat, which is a good source of vitamin C and familiar to Afghans, but usually consumed cooked and hence with much lower vitamin C content, is suggested.
Language:English
Score: 945640 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...n&DS=E/ICEF/2004/P/L.31&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Community‐Based Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) programme  implemented  Low Birth Weight Supplementation: Vitamin A  children/women both Zinc is used in treatment of some diarrhoea casesIron Folate  children/women ?? (...) Int’l Code of Marketing of BMS yes Vitamins and Minerals Voluntary: Salt (60%),  Social Protection policies or legislation including food or nutrition component Food safety policies or legislation 1.  (...) Maternal leave  12 weeks yes Other vitamins & min child/women Child Food fortification yes ??
Language:English
Score: 944410.1 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...ofile_-_Timor_Leste_280714.pdf
Data Source: un
Nutrient Reference values for Vitamin A used in the Nutrition/Dietary adequacy section were used after: Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc.
Language:English
Score: 943720.9 - https://www.fao.org/gift-indiv...od-consumption/methodology/es/
Data Source: un
Nutrient Reference values for Vitamin A used in the Nutrition/Dietary adequacy section were used after: Institute of Medicine. 2001. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc.
Language:English
Score: 943720.9 - https://www.fao.org/gift-indiv...on/methodology/indicadores/es/
Data Source: un