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RS or Ms. RL to bring water or coffee almost every day. Often, the Applicant also asked Ms. RS or Ms. RL to warm up her coffee if she was not happy with the temperature of the coffee that had been served to her. (...) Regarding refilling water for her, she maintains that requests for water were commonplace in the office and other staff also made similar requests. 36.
Language:English
Score: 1149024.4 - www.un.org/en/internalj...dt/judgments/undt-2021-149.pdf
Data Source: oaj
“I don’t feel my fingers, the water is freezing,” “We need new tents, blankets and warm clothes to protect ourselves this winter”  Iman, 11, UNICEF/Syria2018/Delil Souleiman A child washes her hands from a UNICEF-supported water tank in Areesheh camp in northeastern Syria. “Our tent is worn out and my children need warm winter clothes,” Yusra, 48, UNICEF/Syria2018/Delil Souleiman Yusra, 48, is burning pieces of carton to heat water, outside her family’s tent in Areesheh camp, northeastern Syria. (...) “Back in our village, I used to like winter because we could keep warm,” he adds. “Back in our village, I used to like winter because we could keep warm,” Saddam, 11, Related topics Children of Syria Internal displacement Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Water supply Child friendly spaces Health supplies Child protection Syrian Arab Republic More to explore Photo Essay Around 25,000 students resumed their learning in Aleppo.
Language:English
Score: 1131319.3 - https://www.unicef.org/syria/s...ern-syria-against-harsh-winter
Data Source: un
The frequency and extent of tropical storms is also affected by the warming ocean. Cyclones, hurricanes, and typhoons feed on warm waters at the ocean surface. (...) Many people now face the threat of not having enough water on a regular basis. A warming, rising ocean The ocean soaks up most of the heat from global warming. (...) As the ocean warms, its volume increases since water expands as it gets warmer.
Language:English
Score: 1124360 - https://www.un.org/en/climatec.../causes-effects-climate-change
Data Source: un
The frequency and extent of tropical storms is also affected by the warming ocean. Cyclones, hurricanes, and typhoons feed on warm waters at the ocean surface. (...) Many people now face the threat of not having enough water on a regular basis. A warming, rising ocean The ocean soaks up most of the heat from global warming. (...) As the ocean warms, its volume increases since water expands as it gets warmer.
Language:English
Score: 1124360 - https://www.un.org/en/node/169306
Data Source: un
Future emissions cause future additional warming. A level of 1.5 °C of global warming (averaged over 20 years) relative to 1850–1900 is expected to be reached in the near term (2021–2040). (...) Observed change in extreme still water level. Defined as the 99th percentile of daily observed water levels over 1995-2014. (...) Moreover, unprecedented events will become more frequent with higher levels of warming, for example at 3 °C of global warming compared to 2 °C of global warming (Table 2, Figure 9).
Language:English
Score: 1119446.3 - https://public.wmo.int/en/reso...xtreme-events-ipcc-2021-report
Data Source: un
A National Ocean Service tide station at Calcasieu Pass, Louisiana observed a water level rise of 9 feet mean high water. Active season There have so far been 13 named storms this season. (...) But we do expect to see more powerful storms in future as a result of global warming. That's because storms feed on warm water, and higher water temperatures also lead to sea-level rise, which in turn increases the risk of flooding during high tides and in the event of storm surges. (...) Storm size responses to anthropogenic warming are uncertain. The global proportion of tropical cyclones that reach very intense (Category 4 and 5) levels will likely increase due to anthropogenic warming over the next century. 
Language:English
Score: 1110925.7 - https://public.wmo.int/en/medi.../news/hurricane-laura-hits-usa
Data Source: un
El Niño tends to have a warming effect on global temperatures, whilst La Niña has the opposite. (...) In warmer ocean waters, the mixing between water layers is reduced, and with it the supply of oxygen and nutrients for marine life. (...) Sea level rise is due to meltwater from glaciers, the expansion of warmer sea waters and to growing water inputs from ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica.
Language:English
Score: 1102823.2 - https://public.wmo.int/en/medi...-ocean-our-climate-and-weather
Data Source: un
Authorities reported at least one hundred people were killed, with many more missing as people were trapped or swept away by waters. Images of collapsed houses and landlides showed the force of the waters. (...) IPCC Special Report Global Warming of 1.5°C mentions that human-induced global warming has already caused multiple observed changes in the climate system. (...) Several regional changes in climate are assessed to occur even with global warming up to 1.5°C as compared to pre-industrial levels, including warming of extreme temperatures in many regions, increases in frequency, intensity and/or amount of heavy precipitation in several regions.
Language:English
Score: 1102728 - https://public.wmo.int/en/medi...-extremes-floods-heat-and-fire
Data Source: un
The reasons for this process are mainly the emissions of the so called “Greenhouse Gases” (GHG)1) and the accumulation of these gases in the atmosphere with the effect that infrared radiation remains in it and warms up the lower layers of the atmosphere, ground and water. (...) Therefore, we have to face the challenge to find a solution for this condition caused by us. 1) GHG are: CO2 , methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, carbonflourocarbon compounds (CFC) and water vapour Global Warming as a Risk. Our society and therefore our economy has been developed “around” the current climate. (...) Some concrete global consequences:  Increase of arid regions in the World, acceleration of desertification (deterioration of food and water situation)  Decrease of biodiversity (irretrievably lost of species)  Increase of seasonal thaw of Arctic permafrost (damaging infrastructure and higher methane emissions (methane has a higher intensity than CO2 )  Acceleration of melting process of Arctic and Antarctic ice and tropical glaciers (rise sea level and drinking water scarcity)  Sea-level rise (increasing coastal inundation, damage to infrastructure)  Unusual strong whether related catastrophes (cities and crops will be affected) Global Warming is manageable!
Language:English
Score: 1101051.6 - https://www.itu.int/themes/cli.../Deutsche%20Telekom%20-ITU.pdf
Data Source: un
Climate change and extreme weather | World Meteorological Organization Skip to main content World Meteorological Organization Weather · Climate · Water Toggle navigation العربية 简体中文 English Français Русский Español Go Our mandate What we do Weather How we do it Public-Private Engagement (PPE) ocp innovation webinar Space borne Precipitation Measurements and Application WMO and HMEI Information Day WMO Innovation Seminar - Microsoft and the UN Sustainable Development Goals Climate Focus areas Water Programmes Projects Resources Bulletin MeteoWorld Library Gender Equality Education and training Standards and Recommended Practices The WMO Building / Conference Centre Language resources World Meteorological Day United in Science Coronavirus (COVID-19) Media Events About us Who we are Vision, Mission, Strategic Planning Members Governance The Secretariat Employment Awards Procurement Finance and Accountability Related links FAQs Contact us Community Platform Reform Search form Search Home Resources World Meteorological Day World Meteorological Day 2022 - Early Warning and Early Action Climate change and extreme weather Climate change and extreme weather WMD_2022_Climate_Change_and_Extreme_Weather.jpg Climate change and extreme weather The occurrence of extreme events is unprecedented in the observed record and will increase with increasing global warming, according to  the Sixth Assessment report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).  Every bit of warming matters. It says that “human-induced climate change is already affecting many weather and climate extremes in every region across the globe. (...) Climate change also plays out through the water cycle - a warmer atmosphere holds more moisture.
Language:English
Score: 1093602.9 - https://public.wmo.int/en/reso...ate-change-and-extreme-weather
Data Source: un