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REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE ENJOYMENT OF HUMAN RIGHTS BY PERSONS WITH ALBINISM : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
Information was received from the non-governmental organization Kilimanjaro Sunscreen (KiliSun) and the Kilimanjaro Sunscreen Production Unit, United Republic of Tanzania. (...) In poor countries, “sunscreens are prohibitively expensive, leading to a focus on sun avoidance and protection from an early age”.29 At schools in sunny climates, sun exposure may also differ between boys and girls as they tend to have different leisure activities and wear different clothes. (...) A/HRC/37/57 14 such as sunscreen, that would protect them from the elevated risk of developing skin cancer.
Language:English
Score: 2119723.4 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/37/57&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Make sure you seek shade! Shirt, sunscreen and hat are a must! • Limit exposure during midday hours. • Seek shade. • Wear protective clothing. • Wear a broad-brimmed hat to protect the eyes, face and neck. • Protect the eyes with wrap-around- design sunglasses or sunglasses with side panels. • Use and reapply broad-spectrum sunscreen of sun protection factor (SPF)15+ liberally • Avoid tanning beds. • Protect babies and young children: this is particularly important. (...) SUN PROTECTION MESSAGES • Wear sunglasses, a wide-brimmed hat and protective clothing, and frequently apply sunscreen of SPF 15+ to protect yourself. • Applying sunscreen is not a means to prolong your stay in the sun but to reduce the health risk of your exposure. • Taking certain medications as well as using perfumes and deodorants can sensitize your skin, causing serious burns in the sun. (...) High altitudes and fresh snow can double your UV radiation exposure, so wear sunglasses and sunscreen! • Going on a sunny vacation?
Language:English
Score: 1916887.9 - https://www.who.int/uv/publications/en/UVIGuide.pdf
Data Source: un
SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES FACED BY PERSONS WITH ALBINISM : REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
Protective practices consist of sun avoidance, wearing protective clothing and wide -brimmed hats and applying high-protection sunscreen. (...) The information available on the practices of persons with albinism with regard to sun protection focused largely on the situation in sub -Saharan Africa. It shows that sunscreen is not widely available there, is often unaffordable and it is often not on the national list of essential medicines. When affordable sunscreen is available at local hospitals, the cost and time involved in travelling to collect it deter many families.
Language:English
Score: 1894440.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/72/169&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
VISIT TO BRAZIL :REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE ENJOYMENT OF HUMAN RIGHTS BY PERSONS WITH ALBINISM, IKPONWOSA ERO
She also notes that the Municipality of Salvador has been distributing sunscreen free of charge to persons with albinism since 2006. 43. (...) The Independent Expert recommends that more effort be made to ensure that sunscreen is accessible to those who need it. 78. (...) Nevertheless, the Independent Expert was also informed that sunscreen had to be collected in the city centre.
Language:English
Score: 1843642.4 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=A/HRC/46/32/ADD.1&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Read: https://t.co/big5v384lS #NotGhosts #StandUp4HumanRights pic.twitter.com/ZZDsUE5hl5 — UN Special Procedures (@UN_SPExperts) September 17, 2018 “There is also a need for reasonable accommodation to help persons with albinism,” stressed the UN expert, such as providing support such as special eye-wear, for those with low-vision, which often occurs with albinism. “The provision of such devices would help break down significant barriers to education and finding indoor employment,” she elaborated, suggesting also that hospitals dispense sunscreen, which is frequently unavailable “because of poverty and distance.” (...) Ero welcomed the Government’s plans to remedy these barriers and strongly encouraged producing sunscreen locally, to help persons with albinism integrate more easily into the workplace.
Language:English
Score: 1810376.8 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2018/09/1019652
Data Source: un
Do It All to protect yourself You should Do It All to protect yourself from heat this summer – using sunscreen, staying in the shade, wearing a hat and sunglasses. You can also Do It All to protect yourself from COVID-19 by cleaning your hands frequently and thoroughly, keeping a safe distance, wearing your mask in closed and confined areas, avoiding crowds, meeting outdoors when possible, making sure room are well ventilated when indoors, and getting vaccinated.
Language:English
Score: 1785854.5 - https://www.unicef.org/armenia.../summer-2021-how-make-it-yours
Data Source: un
ALBINISM WORLDWIDE :NOTE / BY THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
In Malawi and Namibia, sunscreen products are on the Ministry of Health ’s list of essential drugs, and free sunscreen is provided in public hospitals in South Africa. (...) In addition, most of them are poor and cannot afford to buy sunscreen or sun-protection clothing.28 53. In Japan, persons with albinism who have high visual acuity are often not recognized as having a disability. (...) In Turkey, there is limited access to psychological support and assistive devices such as visual aids, sunglasses and sunscreen for persons with albinism. 52 Sunscreens are not commonly subsidized or covered by public health insurance. 53 Even in private insurance programmes, skin and eye care coverage is often not included in policies for persons with albinism.
Language:English
Score: 1732686.3 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/74/190&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
To prevent bites from mosquitoes that feed during the day and early evening hours, travellers are advised to: wear clothing - preferably light coloured - that covers as much of the body as possible; use insect repellents that contain DEET (diethyltoluamide), IR 3535 ((3- [N-butyl-N-acetyl], aminopropionic acid ethyl-ester) or KBR3023 (also called Icaridin or Picaridin). Repellents may be applied to exposed skin or to clothing and must be used in strict accordance with the label instructions. If repellents and sunscreen are used together, sunscreen should be applied first and the repellent thereafter; use physical barriers such as regular or mesh screens or insecticide treated netting materials on doors and windows, and keep doors and windows closed; and sleep under mosquito nets during the day when Aedes mosquitoes are most active.
Language:English
Score: 1668326 - https://www.who.int/csr/diseas.../information-for-travelers/en/
Data Source: un
However, sweaters or jackets may be needed for the winter months, especially in the evenings. Protective wear - hats or some form of protection for the head, sunglasses for the eyes and sunscreen - are advised when in direct sunlight. A lthough Bahrain has a liberal attitude, it is always wise to respect the religion and culture of the country by wearing appropriate and more modest clothing in public places.  
Language:English
Score: 1614511.5 - https://www.icao.int/Meetings/...Pages/General-Information.aspx
Data Source: un
WOMEN AND CHILDREN IMPACTED BY ALBINISM : REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE ENJOYMENT OF HUMAN RIGHTS BY PERSONS WITH ALBINISM
In other countries, the lack of availability of health insurance coverage for albinism- related health conditions or products, or the cost of such insurance, pose additional barriers.54 Submissions from Argentina and Paraguay highlighted the high costs of adaptive devices and sunscreen, which makes them unaffordable for a significant number of mothers of children with albinism. 48. (...) The prevailing culture dictates that wearing a hat is disrespectful when going to community meetings, which are usually conducted outdoors in the sun.70 A similar situation was reported to the 63 Submission from Colombia. (...) A/HRC/43/42 12 Independent Expert during her visit to Fiji, where in some rural areas, wearing hats and sunglasses in certain contexts, even for sun protection, is seen as socially inappropriate behaviour (A/HRC/40/62/Add.1, para. 34). 59.
Language:English
Score: 1604081.1 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/43/42&Lang=E
Data Source: ods