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What is the difference between white and brown rice? Brown rice is unpolished whole grain rice that is produced by removing only the outer husk. It becomes white rice when the bran layer is stripped off in the milling process. Is brown rice better for you than white rice? Compared with white rice, brown rice is more nutritious because it contains bran, which is a source of fibre, oils, B vitamins, and important minerals.
Language:English
Score: 1344253.3 - https://www.fao.org/rice2004/en/kids.htm
Data Source: un
Every day at 9 a.m., 25 health workers in seven white trucks start their journey through the grey streets of east Aleppo. (...) To help prevent malnutrition, a team of community volunteers also accompanies the mobile health clinic, passing on information to caregivers and answering questions on how to provide more nutritious diets for their young children. UNICEF Syrian Arab Republic/2017/Al-Issa Bana, a young volunteer on the team, has observed a growing challenge: a number of Aleppo’s children have lost their parents in the fighting. (...) “Their psychological wellbeing and lack of a support system makes it hard for mothers to exclusively breastfeed and to provide the most nutritious foods in their children’s early years of life,” she said.
Language:English
Score: 1338932 - https://www.unicef.org/stories...s-wheels-keep-children-healthy
Data Source: un
Linking the demand for nutritious school meals to local, smallholder production contributes to the socioeconomic development of communities. The whole school community has an active role in promoting nutritious school meals and demanding healthier food environments. (...) Publications FAO School Food and Nutrition Framework Home-Grown School Feeding Resource Framework Nutrition guidelines and standards for school meals Recent publications School-based food and nutrition education: A white paper on the current state, principles, challenges and recommendations Mitigating the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on food and nutrition of schoolchildren Legal guide on school food and nutrition Video Infographics Related links World Food Day 2021 Food and nutrition education Food based dietary guidelines Contact us Terms and Conditions Scam Alert Report Misconduct Jobs Procurement Governing Bodies Office of the Inspector General Evaluation Legal Office Ethics Office FAO organizational chart Regional Office for Africa Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Office for the Near East and North Africa Country Offices X Follow us on                                         Download our App © FAO, 2022
Language:English
Score: 1304810.3 - https://www.fao.org/school-food/en/
Data Source: un
It promotes awareness of the importance of a diversity of nutritious foods for a healthy environment and for healthy people. (...) COMPETITION RULES The drawing should reflect an issue concerning nutritious foods. The drawings may reflect environmental or social issues. (...) Drawings should be on white A4-size or letter-size paper in the round or square frames provided in the annexed templates.
Language:English
Score: 1258573.9 - https://www.un.org/youthenvoy/...rnational-drawing-competition/
Data Source: un
Their concern over the health of baby Vanessa led White to a traditional healer, the preferred method of help for their community in Machinga. (...) UNICEF Malawi/2020/Nyirenda Liveness preparing a nutritious meal for her children Liveness is careful not to neglect the care of the healthy twin as she is now aware of the different food groups needed for the babies to grow strong and healthy. (...) “This is my contribution to the fight against COVID-19” says White. He says he wishes for his daughters to choose a career in the medicine when they grow up as he now appreciates the role doctors and nurses play in society.
Language:English
Score: 1225463.1 - https://www.unicef.org/malawi/...ting-malnutrition-rural-malawi
Data Source: un
“Most days our lunch and dinner will be white rice with a piece of chicken from a stall nearby that we cut into many small pieces to share. (...) The family’s typical meals consist of plain fried rice for breakfast, white rice, sardine and taugeh (bean sprouts) for lunch and dinner. (...) Her daughter cannot eat red meat and gluten, making the task of finding her filling and nutritious meals at a budget, that much harder for the mother of five.
Language:English
Score: 1218450.2 - https://www.unicef.org/malaysia/stories/hungry-city
Data Source: un
One of the goals of the 2016 International Year of Pulses is to increase consumption of these nutritious seeds. What better way to do this than to provide ideas and inspiration for new dishes made with pulses? (...) Chickpeas, kidney beans, black beans, white beans, navy beans, fava beans, pigeon peas, black-eyed peas (cowpeas) and split peas are all considered pulses.
Language:English
Score: 1210214.5 - https://www.fao.org/pulses-201.../news/news-detail/en/c/379896/
Data Source: un
UNICEF UNICEF/UN0565519/Pazos Available in: Español English Understanding the challenges they face is a starting point to promote a healthy lifestyle and improve access to nutritious food. During the pandemic, it has been difficult for many families to have access to healthy food. (...) Listening to them and understanding the challenges they face is a starting point for promoting healthier lifestyles, improving access to nutritious food, and generating more evidence to support decision-making by world and national leaders on issues related to food environments and systems, as well as the promotion of physical activity in the region. (...) Regarding food consumption, since 2020 the consumption of bread, white flour, rice and pasta has increased . Regarding fruits and vegetables, the consumption of this food group varies in the region, registering a lower consumption in most of the countries.
Language:English
Score: 1209886.3 - https://www.unicef.org/lac/en/...ical-activity-context-covid-19
Data Source: un
6 incredible plants you might not have heard of العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español About FAO Regular programme country contributions About us Director-General Leadership Organizational chart Worldwide offices Governing Body documents Office of Strategy, Programme and Budget (OSP) Oversight Advisory Committee FAO and the UN Meetings Visit us In action FAO at work Projects Standards and policies Sustainable Development Goals Media News releases Stories Archive Countries good practices Video Photo Audio Webcast Contacts Main topics Resources Data Interactive stories Infographics Publications Member countries Country Profiles FAO Members Gateway Low-Income Food-Deficit countries Get involved Partnerships Work with us Ask FAO FAO on social media Invest About FAO About us Director-General Leadership Organizational chart Worldwide offices Governing Bodies Oversight Advisory Committee FAO and the UN Meetings Visit us In action FAO at work Projects Standards and Policies Sustainable Development Goals Media News Stories Countries good practices Video Photos Audio Webcast Media contacts Main topics Main topics content Resources Data Interactive stories Infographics Publications Member countries Country Profiles FAO Members Gateway Low-Income Food-Deficit countries Get involved Partnerships Work with us Ask FAO FAO on social media Invest Print Send 6 incredible plants you might not have heard of Discover these tasty, nutritious crops and include them in your diet! 04 Feb 2015 All over the world local varieties of fruit, vegetables and grain are grown. (...) Moringa leaves are rich in protein, vitamins A, B and C, and minerals – highly recommended for pregnant and nursing mothers as well as young children. Teff grains are white, mixed or red, with the white fetching the highest and red the lowest price.
Language:English
Score: 1194768.3 - https://www.fao.org/zhc/detail-events/en/c/275640/
Data Source: un
VISIT TO ZIMBABWE : REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE RIGHT TO FOOD
In 1961, a constitution was formulated that favoured whites in power. In 1965, the Government unilaterally declared its independence, but the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland did not recognize the act and demanded more complete voting rights for the black African majority in the country. (...) Considering the importance of a diversified and nutritious diet to build Zimbabweans’ resilience to the current economic and climate change-related shocks, the Special Rapporteur strongly supports the Government in its strategy to intensify efforts to diversify the agricultural production and to support alternatives to maize. 64. (...) Children are often fed only with sadza, which is not sufficiently nutritious. At times, they eat some vegetables, mostly cabbage. 15 Sarah Cusick, PhD and Michael K.
Language:English
Score: 1183066.4 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=A/HRC/43/44/ADD.2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods