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The indictment alleges, among other things, that: “In addition to the deliberate destruction of property owned by Kosovo Albanian civilians, forces of the FRY and Serbia committed widespread or systematic acts of brutality and violence against Kosovo Albanian civilians in order to perpetuate the climate of fear, create chaos and a pervading fear for life. (...) Many Kosovo Albanians who were not directly forcibly expelled from their communities fled as a result of the climate of terror created by the widespread or systematic beatings, harassment, sexual assaults, unlawful arrests, killings, shelling and looting carried out across the province. (...) The indictment alleges that the forces of FRY and Serbia “acting at the direction, with the encouragement, or with the support of” Sreten Lukić, murdered hundreds of Kosovo Albanian civilians as part of a widespread and systematic campaign of brutality and violence that resulted in the forced deportation of approximately 800,000 Kosovo Albanian civilians.
Language:English
Score: 1084388.5 - https://www.icty.org/en/node/4234
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Further, Martić challenges the finding that there was a widespread and systematic attack against the Croat and non-Serb civilian population in those territories during the same period. (...) Finally, the Trial Chamber explicitly found that the objective of uniting Serb areas was implemented “through widespread and systematic armed attacks”… “and through the commission of acts of violence and intimidation”. (...) That said, the Appeals Chamber notes that the relevance of the “civilian population” in Article 5 of the Statute is to the chapeau requirement that there be a widespread or systematic attack against a civilian population.
Language:English
Score: 1083102.1 - https://www.icty.org/x/cases/m...n/081008_Martic_summary_en.pdf
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The inquiry procedure would: Allow investigation of substantial abuses of women's human rights by an international body of experts; Be useful where individual communications fail to reflect the systemic nature of widespread violations of women's rights; Allow widespread violations to be investigated where individuals or groups may be unable to make communications (for practical reasons or because of fear of reprisals); Give the Committee an opportunity to make recommendations regarding the structural causes of violations; Allow the Committee to address a broad range of issues in a particular country.  
Language:English
Score: 1082630.7 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/...daw/protocol/communication.htm
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Case No.: IT-94-1-Tbis-R117 11 November 1999 7 widespread and systematic basis, although paragraph 48 of the United Nations Secretary General’s Report21 (to which the Tribunal’s Statute is attached) indicates that “crimes against humanity refer to inhumane acts of a very serious nature, such as wilful killing, torture or rape committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack against any civilian population on national, political, ethnic, racial or religious grounds.” As a general rule, indictments of the Tribunal allege that crimes against humanity are committed on a widespread or systematic basis.22 Nor does the Statute establishing the Rwanda Tribunal23 make any distinction as to relative gravity between crimes against humanity and war crimes; however, in contradistinction to the Tribunal’s Statute, the definition of crimes against humanity (in Article 3) does contain the requirement that they be committed on a widespread and systematic basis. The mere fact that crimes against humanity are generally required to be committed on a widespread and systematic basis does not, by itself, make them more serious than war crimes, and certainly, this cannot be the case where they are constituted by the very same acts as war crimes.
Language:English
Score: 1081677 - https://www.icty.org/x/cases/t...tjug/en/tad-tsojrob991111e.pdf
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This very same reason motivates telecom operators to be supportive to telemedicine pilot projects. (...) This is equally important for both developed and developing countries. The widespread delivery of communication services (for example telecenters) in rural areas could bring solutions for telemedicine as well. (...) Telemedicine is ready for widespread implementation, as the equipment has advanced to the point where its applications are practical and potentially cost-effective.
Language:English
Score: 1081594.1 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...ealth/abstracts/abs-s2-01.html
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Child marriage is a frequent but not the sole reason for Romani girls dropping out of school. The number of female drop-outs is considerably higher than the number of those married at child age. (...) Generally, there are three models among different Romani groups: 1) a widespread practice is that girls get married at the age of 12 to 15, and the eighth grade is the highest possible educational status that can be achieved (however, not by all girls); 2) completing primary school is the norm, starting secondary school is an option, and 16 years of age is acceptable for getting married; 3) completing secondary school is the educational minimum and, generally, the marital trends do not differ from the ones in the surrounding majority. (...) These are problems of the educational system, such as the lack of secondary schools in the place of residence, the low level of education in the “Gypsy schools” (which demotivates students and parents), the lack of extracurricular activities, and the overall devaluation of education in the country. The widespread unemployment and discrimination on the basis of ethnic origin when applying for a job are also reasons for the low interest and motivation on behalf of both parents and children.
Language:English
Score: 1079080.3 - https://www.unicef.org/bulgari...nt-roma-girls-access-education
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The Chamber is satisfied that the supporting evidence, which includes ICC and non-ICC statements, public reports emanating from the United Nations (“UN”) and its agencies, public reports of non-governmental organisations (“NGO”) and news reports, is sufficient to establish reasonable grounds to believe that a non-international armed conflict took place and a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population occurred. 15. (...) After the 5 December 2013 Bangui Attack, Yekatom ordered the destruction of Muslim homes in Boeing and the Boeing mosque by 20 December 2013 at the latest.67 His subordinates, including Freddy Ouandjio, Habib Beina, FACA caporal Junior Kempes, his brother Junior Saragba and Namkoisse, participated in these crimes.68 In the light of the foregoing, the Chamber finds reasonable grounds to believe that the acts described above amount to crimes against humanity, committed as part of a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population, namely persecution (article 7(1)(h) of the Statute); and war crimes, committed in the context of and associated with an armed conflict not of an international character, namely intentionally directing an attack against buildings dedicated to religion (article 8(2)(e)(iv) of the Statute)69 and destroying or seizing the property of an adversary (article 8(2)(e)(xii) of the Statute).70 The Chamber is satisfied that the supporting evidence, mainly ICC witness statements, is sufficient to establish reasonable grounds to believe that the above-mentioned crimes were committed. c. (...) ICC-01/14-01/22-2-Red2 22-03-2022 21/39 NM PT No: ICC-01/14-01/22 22/39 22 March 2022 2015, over 42 people, many of them children, died of severe malnutrition and respiratory and other diseases.118 In the light of the foregoing, the Chamber finds reasonable grounds to believe that the acts described above amount to crimes against humanity, committed as part of a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population, namely murder (article 7(1)(a) of the Statute), extermination (article 7(1)(b) of the Statute), imprisonment or other severe deprivation of physical liberty (article 7(1)(e) of the Statute), persecution (article 7(1)(h) of the Statute) and other inhumane acts insofar as Muslims in the enclave resided in deplorable circumstances (article 7(1)(k) of the Statute); and war crimes, committed in the context of and associated with an armed conflict not of an international character, namely murder (article 8(2)(c)(i) of the Statute).
Language:English
Score: 1079001.7 - https://www.icc-cpi.int/sites/.../CourtRecords/CR2022_02267.PDF
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The Chamber is satisfied that the supporting evidence, which includes ICC and non-ICC statements, public reports emanating from the United Nations (“UN”) and its agencies, public reports of non-governmental organisations (“NGO”) and news reports, is sufficient to establish reasonable grounds to believe that a non-international armed conflict took place and a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population occurred. 16. (...) ICC-01/14-02/18-2-Red 13-12-2018 12/39 EC PT No: ICC-01/14-02/18 13/39 13 December 2018 In the light of the foregoing, the Chamber finds reasonable grounds to believe that the acts described above amount to crimes against humanity, committed as part of a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population, namely persecution (article 7(1)(h) of the Statute); and war crimes, committed in the context of and associated with an armed conflict not of an international character, namely intentionally directing an attack against buildings dedicated to religion (article 8(2)(e)(iv) of the Statute) 70 and destroying or seizing the property of an adversary (article 8(2)(e)(xii) of the Statute). 71 The Chamber is satisfied that the supporting evidence, mainly ICC witness statements, is sufficient to establish reasonable grounds to believe that the above-mentioned crimes were committed. c. (...) ICC-01/14-02/18-2-Red 13-12-2018 20/39 EC PT No: ICC-01/14-02/18 21/39 13 December 2018 only several hundred Muslims remained in Yaloké, which previously housed a Muslim population estimated to be in the thousands. 116 In the light of the foregoing, the Chamber finds reasonable grounds to believe that the acts described above amount to crimes against humanity, committed as part of a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population, namely deportation or forcible transfer of population (article 7(1)(d) of the Statute) and persecution (article 7(1)(h) of the Statute); and war crimes, committed in the context of and associated with an armed conflict not of an international character, namely displacement of the civilian population (article 8(2)(e)(viii) of the Statute).
Language:English
Score: 1079001.7 - https://www.icc-cpi.int/sites/.../CourtRecords/CR2018_05929.PDF
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It represents a challenge for two very different reasons. Firstly, many people who have had no problems accessing analogue television will experience some difficulty in accessing digital television. The extent of this issue is such that approximately 15% of Europeans have difficulties in accessing digital television for reasons such as: • Hearing impairments • Dyslexia • Visual impairments • The complexity of setting up a digital receiver or set-top-box • Remote controls they find difficult to use • Electronic Programme Guides (especially when there are over one hundred channels to choose from) Figure 1: Screenshot of a signing service provided on a virtual channel Secondly, the analogue switch-off will introduce widespread improvements to the quality of existing digital television programmes, collectively known as second generation digital television, such as high definition television (HDTV). (...) To ensure the challenge is addressed and the opportunity exploited, DTV4All takes action on two fronts: Ensuring the widespread adoption of mature access services for first generation digital television Identifying, assessing and promoting emerging access services for second generation digital television The most valuable contribution DTV4All can make is to identify the enablers that will allow a core set of access services to be offered in all EU member countries in the near future.
Language:English
Score: 1059214.3 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it.../06/42/T06420000030005PDFE.pdf
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In each paragraph charging crimes against humanity, the alleged acts or omissions were part of a widespread, large-scale or systematic attack directed against the Bosnian Muslim civilian population of the cities, towns, villages and hamlets in the municipalities of Vitez, Busovaca, Kiseljak and Zenica. (...) This persecution was perpetrated through the following: Attacks on Cities, Towns and Villages: 6.1. The widespread and systematic attack of cities, towns and villages, inhabited by Bosnian Muslims, in the municipalities of Vitez, Busovaca, Kiseljak, and Zenica. (...) The persecution of Bosnian Muslim civilians, as alleged above, was on such a large scale and widespread basis, and implemented in such a systematic fashion, that it has significantly reduced the Bosnian Muslim civilian population from those areas of the municipalities of Vitez, Busovaca and Kiseljak where the HVO seized control.
Language:English
Score: 1058784.2 - https://www.icty.org/x/cases/b...skic/ind/en/bla-2ai970425e.pdf
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