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Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Government launches new rotavirus vaccine to protect children from diarrhea 26 June 2018 UGANDA, BUIKWE, 26 JUNE 2018 – The Government of Uganda has today launched a new rotavirus vaccine to protect under five-year-old children from diarrhea. (...) Rotavirus infection is the leading cause of diarrhea in children under five and it is highly contagious. (...) The virus may cause severe, dehydrating diarrhea in young children and, in untreated cases, lead to death.
Language:English
Score: 1271308.4 - https://www.unicef.org/uganda/...cine-protect-children-diarrhea
Data Source: un
Accelerating Policy Change, Translation and Implementation for Pneumonia and Diarrhea Commodities | UNICEF Pakistan Skip to main content Pakistan Toggle navigation Global Links Visit UNICEF Global High contrast Pakistan EXPLORE UNICEF About us Contact us Work with us Press Centre Donate Main navigation What we do Research and reports Stories Take action Search area has closed. (...) Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Report Accelerating Policy Change, Translation and Implementation for Pneumonia and Diarrhea Commodities Midterm Evaluation Report of the project 2016-2020 Highlights UNICEF Pakistan, through financial assistance of Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is implementing the project for ‘Accelerating Policy Change, Translation and Implementation for Pneumonia and Diarrhea Commodities in Pakistan (hereinafter called the Project or P&D Project). (...) The end-users and other stakeholders were involved mainly as participants, i.e. interviewees and focus group participants Author(s) Contech International Publication date December 2019 Languages English Download Download file (PDF, 6,21 MB) Related topics Pneumonia diarrhea Pakistan South Asia More to explore Press release 12 November 2019 One child dies of pneumonia every 39 seconds, agencies warn Visit the page Article Managing pneumonia and diarrhea through new commodities Making pneumonia and diarrhea manageable and ensuring child survival Read the story Footer UNICEF Home What we do Stories About us Current vacancies in UNICEF Pakistan Our Representative Suppliers and service providers Research and reports Become a donor Social Footer Secondary Contact Us Legal Footer tertiary Report fraud, abuse, wrongdoing
Language:English
Score: 1268094 - https://www.unicef.org/pakista...ntation-pneumonia-and-diarrhea
Data Source: un
PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, CIVIL, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO DEVELOPMENT :WRITTEN STATEMENT / SUBMITTED BY ORGANIZATION FOR DEFENDING VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE
A/HRC/44/NGO/10 3 of various diseases such as cholera, diarrhea, cancer, dengue fever, tuberculosis, respiratory failure among the people, women and children in particular. Yemeni Children and Diseases According to a UNICEF report more than 5 million Yemeni children are in increased risk of contracting cholera and acute diarrhea in the middle of the outbreak of COVID-19 virus and the arrival of the monsoon season. (...) • ODVV calls on the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Rights of the Child to launch extensive and targeted investigations into Yemeni children’s conditions and the negative impact of the conflict and coalition attacks on them, and submit the findings to the Human Rights Council. 3 https://www.unicef.org/press-releases/over-5-million-children-face-threatcholera-and-acute-water- diarrhea-midst-covid-19. 4 https://www.unicef.org/press-releases/unicef-executive-director-henrietta-fore-addresses-un-security- council-yemen-news. 5 https://www.unicef.org/appeals/yemen.html. 6 https://per.euronew.com/2020/09/26/yemen-two-million-children-are-out-of-school.
Language:English
Score: 1262385.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...open&DS=A/HRC/44/NGO/10&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Drinking dirty water, infested with worms and other impurities, meant many of us got diarrhea.” Ali’s wife, Samia, added. “Our boys and girls were missing school because they left early in the morning to fetch water and were not allowed to go to class because they arrived so late.”
Language:English
Score: 1254911.6 - https://www.unocha.org/sites/u...ian_Fund_Dashboard_Q3_2018.pdf
Data Source: un
If you can't read now, just listen to the audio version:  Eliaba Anthony Amba lives with his wife and two children in a village in Maridi, west of South Sudan’s capital city Juba. (...) Bennet’s children often fell sick, mostly with malaria or diarrhea. However, with proper information on how to tackle these ailments, the children do no longer fall ill as regularly.  
Language:English
Score: 1254911.6 - https://www.un.org/africarenew...rvices-rural-homes-south-sudan
Data Source: un
diarrhea | UNICEF Pakistan Skip to main content Pakistan Toggle navigation Global Links Visit UNICEF Global High contrast Pakistan EXPLORE UNICEF About us Contact us Work with us Press Centre Donate Main navigation What we do Research and reports Stories Take action Search area has closed. (...) Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max 0B792406-3C90-48E8-AF22-4D48618D699F Created with sketchtool. Search results diarrhea Available in: English Urdu Report 02 December 2020 Accelerating Policy Change, Translation and Implementation Midterm Evaluation Report of the project 2016-2020 Download file (PDF, 6,21 MB) Report 30 November 2020 Study on budgetary gap analysis of Diarrhoea and Pneumonia This study estimates the funding required to reduce child mortality and morbidity caused due to diarrhoea and pneumonia Download file (PDF, 825,74 KB) Article 15 February 2018 Managing pneumonia and diarrhea through new commodities Making pneumonia and diarrhea manageable and ensuring child survival Footer UNICEF Home What we do Stories About us Current vacancies in UNICEF Pakistan Our Representative Suppliers and service providers Research and reports Become a donor Social Footer Secondary Contact Us Legal Footer tertiary Report fraud, abuse, wrongdoing
Language:English
Score: 1248152.1 - https://www.unicef.org/pakistan/topics/diarrhea
Data Source: un
Many of the children start having diarrhea as the weather gets warmer in Bamyan. Locals call this the diarrhea season, and mothers start to have sleepless nights tending to their children.  “My two daughters, Basira, 4   and Sajeda, 3 got very sick, they became very weak suffering from diarrhea,” says Uzra with visible scare in her eyes.    (...) “Mothers don’t know about the ORS/Zinc pack, or how to prepare them, it is our duty to guide them and advise them on how to treat their children suffering from diarrhea,” adds Hakima.    Hakima assessed Basira and Sajeda for diarrhea and found they need ORS and Zinc.
Language:English
Score: 1237490.4 - https://www.unicef.org/afghani...stories/healers-sheena-village
Data Source: un
Many of the children start having diarrhea as the weather gets warmer in Bamyan. Locals call this the diarrhea season, and mothers start to have sleepless nights tending to their children.  “My two daughters, Basira, 4   and Sajeda, 3 got very sick, they became very weak suffering from diarrhea,” says Uzra with visible scare in her eyes.    (...) “Mothers don’t know about the ORS/Zinc pack, or how to prepare them, it is our duty to guide them and advise them on how to treat their children suffering from diarrhea,” adds Hakima.    Hakima assessed Basira and Sajeda for diarrhea and found they need ORS and Zinc.
Language:English
Score: 1237490.4 - https://www.unicef.org/rosa/stories/healers-sheena-village
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Report Landscape analysis for policy translation and commodity access in Pakistan 2017 Insights on barriers and facilitators to policy translation and commodity access in the public and private sector of the country Highlights This report presents the findings of a landscape analysis on Pneumonia and Diarrhea among children of Pakistan, which have long been regarded as diseases of poverty, closely related to living conditions with poor hygiene and sanitation, malnutrition as well as limited access to other basic necessities. (...) The Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD) has ranked Pakistan as third highest with the score of 46 (UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation, 2015). Author(s) UNICEF Pakistan, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Publication date January 2018 Languages English Download Download file (PDF, 3,36 MB) Related topics Pneumonia diarrhoea  Data and reports Pakistan South Asia More to explore Press release 12 November 2019 One child dies of pneumonia every 39 seconds, agencies warn Visit the page Article Managing pneumonia and diarrhea through new commodities Making pneumonia and diarrhea manageable and ensuring child survival Read the story Footer UNICEF Home What we do Stories About us Current vacancies in UNICEF Pakistan Our Representative Suppliers and service providers Research and reports Become a donor Social Footer Secondary Contact Us Legal Footer tertiary Report fraud, abuse, wrongdoing
Language:English
Score: 1224972.5 - https://www.unicef.org/pakista...commodity-access-pakistan-2017
Data Source: un
Sudan MICS 2014 SUDAN MICS 2014 AT A GLANCE Survey implementation Sample frame Listing Sudan Population Census 2008 July 2014 Questionnaires Household Women (age 15-49) Children under five Interviewer training July 2014 Fieldwork August - November 2014 Survey sample Households - Sampled - Occupied - Interviewed - Response rate (Per cent) 18,000 17,142 16,801 98.0 Children under five - Eligible - Mothers/caretakers interviewed - Response rate (Per cent) 14,751 14,081 95.5 Women - Eligible for interviews - Interviewed - Response rate (Per cent) 20,327 18,302 90.0 Survey population Average household size 5.9 Percentage of population living in - Urban areas - Rural areas 30.8 69.2 Percentage of population under: - Age 5 - Age 18 15.2 50.6 Percentage of women age 15-49 years with at least one live birth in the last 2 years 30.7 Housing characteristics Household or personal assets Percentage of households with - Electricity - Finished floor - Finished roofing - Finished walls 44.9 14.0 25.0 28.1 Percentage of households that own - A television - A refrigerator - Agricultural land - Farm animals/livestock 39.6 25.9 39.5 51.0 Mean number of persons per room used for sleeping 3.23 Percentage of households where at least a member has or owns a - Mobile phone - Car or truck 73.8 6.4 Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 2 CHILD MORTALITY Early childhood mortality MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value A 1.1 Neonatal mortality rate Probability of dying within the first month of life 33 1.2 MDG 4.2 Infant mortality rate Probability of dying between birth and the first birthday 52 1.3 Post-neonatal mortality rate Difference between infant and neonatal mortality rates 19 1.4 Child mortality rate Probability of dying between the first and the fifth birthdays 17 1.5 MDG 4.1 Under-five mortality rate Probability of dying between birth and the fifth birthday 68 A Indicator values are per 1,000 live births and refer to the five-year period before the survey Figure 1 : Ear ly chi ldhood mortal i t y rates , Sudan MICS, 2014 Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 3 104 102 83 68 68 71 60 48 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1995-2000 2001-2005 2006-2010 2010-2014 Trends in Under-Five Mortality and Infant Mortality in Sudan as estimated by SHHS 2000, SHHS 2006, SHHS2 2010 and MICS 2014 U5MR-All MICS InfMR-All MICS Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 4 NUTRITION Nutritional statusi MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 2.1a 2.1b MDG 1.8 Underweight prevalence (a) Moderate and severe (b) Severe Percentage of children under age 5 who fall below (a) minus two standard deviations (moderate and severe) (b) minus three standard deviations (severe) of the median weight for age of the WHO standard 33.0 12.0 2.2a 2.2b Stunting prevalence (a) Moderate and severe (b) Severe Percentage of children under age 5 who fall below (a) minus two standard deviations (moderate and severe) (b) minus three standard deviations (severe) of the median height for age of the WHO standard 38.2 18.2 2.3a 2.3b Wasting prevalence (a) Moderate and severe (b) Severe Percentage of children under age 5 who fall below (a) minus two standard deviations (moderate and severe) (b) minus three standard deviations (severe) of the median weight for height of the WHO standard 16.3 4.5 2.4 Overweight prevalence Percentage of children under age 5 who are above two standard deviations of the median weight for height of the WHO standard 3.0 Figure 2 : Underweight , s tunt ed , wast ed and overweight ch i ldren under age 5 (moderat e and sever e) , Sudan MICS, 2014 Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 5 Breastfeeding and infant feeding MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 2.5 Children ever breastfed Percentage of women with a live birth in the last 2 years who breastfed their last live-born child at any time 95.6 2.6 Early initiation of breastfeeding Percentage of women with a live birth in the last 2 years who put their last newborn to the breast within one hour of birth 68.7 2.7 Exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months Percentage of infants under 6 months of age who are exclusively breastfedii 55.4 2.8 Predominant breastfeeding under 6 months Percentage of infants under 6 months of age who received breast milk as the predominant source of nourishmentiii during the previous day 80.8 2.9 Continued breastfeeding at 1 year Percentage of children age 12-15 months who received breast milk during the previous day 89.4 2.10 Continued breastfeeding at 2 years Percentage of children age 20-23 months who received breast milk during the previous day 48.8 2.11 Median duration of breastfeeding The age in months when 50 percent of children age 0-35 months did not receive breast milk during the previous day 21.2 2.12 Age-appropriate breastfeeding Percentage of children age 0-23 months appropriately fediv during the previous day 63.1 2.13 Introduction of solid, semi- solid or soft foods Percentage of infants age 6-8 months who received solid, semi-solid or soft foods during the previous day 61.2 2.14 Milk feeding frequency for non-breastfed children Percentage of non-breastfed children age 6-23 months who received at least 2 milk feedings during the previous day 57.5 2.15 Minimum meal frequency Percentage of children age 6-23 months who received solid, semi-solid and soft foods (plus milk feeds for non- breastfed children) the minimum number of timesv or more during the previous day 40.7 2.16 Minimum dietary diversity Percentage of children age 6–23 months who received foods from 4 or more food groupsvi during the previous day 28.0 2.17a 2.17b Minimum acceptable diet (a) Percentage of breastfed children age 6–23 months who had at least the minimum dietary diversity and the minimum meal frequency during the previous day (b) Percentage of non-breastfed children age 6–23 months who received at least 2 milk feedings and had at least the minimum dietary diversity not including milk feeds and the minimum meal frequency during the previous day 25.0 37.0 2.18 Bottle feeding Percentage of children age 0-23 months who were fed with a bottle during the previous day 7.3 Salt iodization MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 2.19 Iodized salt consumption Percentage of households with salt testing 15 parts per million or more of iodate 7.6 Low-birth weight MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 2.20 Low-birth weight infants Percentage of most recent live births in the last 2 years weighing below 2,500 grams at birth 32.3 2.21 Infants weighed at birth Percentage of most recent live births in the last 2 years who were weighed at birth 16.3 Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 6 CHILD HEALTH Vaccinations MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 3.1 Tuberculosis immunization coverage Percentage of children age 12-23 months who received BCG vaccine by their first birthday 78.5 3.2 Polio immunization coverage Percentage of children age 12-23 months who received the third dose of OPV vaccine (OPV3) by their first birthday 65.3 3.3 3.5 3.6 Pentavalent vaccine (DTP-Hep B-Hib) immunization coverage Percentage of children age 12-23 months who received the third dose of pentavalent vaccine (Penta 3) by their first birthday 63.9 3.4 MDG 4.3 Measles immunization coverage (Measles 1, MCV1) Percentage of children age 12-23 months who received measles vaccine by their first birthday 60.9 3.8 Full immunization coverage Percentage of children age 12-23 months who received allvii vaccinations recommended in the national immunization schedule by their first birthday 42.8 Figure 3 : Vacc inat ions by age 12 months Sudan MICS, 2014 78 30 84 76 65 81 75 64 61 43 13 BCG Polio at birth Polio1 Polio2 Polio3 Pentavalent 1 Pentavalent 2 Pentavalent 3 Measles (MCV1) Measles (MCV2) Fully vaccinated No vaccinations Per cent Children Age 12-23 months 72 30 80 73 59 77 71 58 59 45 36 15 BCG Polio at birth Polio1 Polio2 Polio3 Pentavalent 1 Pentavalent 2 Pentavalent 3 Measles (MCV1) Measles (MCV2) Fully vaccinated No vaccinations Children Age 24-35 months Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 7 Tetanus toxoid MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 3.9 Neonatal tetanus protection Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years who were given at least two doses of tetanus toxoid vaccine within the appropriate interval prior to the most recent birth 58.2 Diarrhea MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value - Children with diarrhea Percentage of children under age 5 with diarrhea in the last 2 weeks 29.0 3.10 Care-seeking for diarrhea Percentage of children under age 5 with diarrhea in the last 2 weeks for whom advice or treatment was sought from a health facility or provider 42.7 3.12 Diarrhea treatment with oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and continued feeding Percentage of children under age 5 with diarrhea in the last 2 weeks who received ORT (ORS packet, pre-packaged ORS fluid, recommended homemade fluid or increased fluids) and continued feeding during the episode of diarrhea. 59.3 Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) symptoms MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value - Children with ARI symptoms Percentage of children under age 5 with ARI symptoms in the last 2 weeks 17.8 3.13 Care-seeking for children with ARI symptoms Percentage of children under age 5 with ARI symptoms in the last 2 weeks for whom advice or treatment was sought from a health facility or provider 48.3 3.14 Antibiotic treatment for children with ARI symptoms Percentage of children under age 5 with ARI symptoms in the last 2 weeks who received antibiotics 59.0 Solid fuel use MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 3.15 Use of solid fuels for cooking Percentage of household members in households that use solid fuels as the primary source of domestic energy to cook 58.2 Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 8 WATER AND SANITATION Water and sanitation MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 4.1 MDG 7.8 Use of improved drinking water sources Percentage of household members using improved sources of drinking water 68.0 4.2 Water treatment Percentage of household members in households using unimproved drinking water who use an appropriate treatment method 4.1 4.3 MDG 7.9 Use of improved sanitation Percentage of household members using improved sanitation facilities which are not shared 32.9 4.4 Safe disposal of child’s feces Percentage of children age 0-2 years whose last stools were disposed of safely 53.0 4.5 Place for hand washing Percentage of households with a specific place for hand washing where water and soap or other cleansing agent are present 25.8 4.6 Availability of soap or other cleansing agent Percentage of households with soap or other cleansing agent 55.4 Figure 4 : Use of improved wat er and san itat ion in urban and rural ar eas , Sudan MICS , 2014 Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 9 REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH Contraception and unmet need MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value - Total fertility rate Total fertility rate A for women age 15-49 years 5.2 5.1 MDG 5.4 Adolescent birth rate Age-specific fertility rate A for women age 15-19 years 87 5.2 Early childbearing Percentage of women age 20-24 years who had at least one live birth before age 18 21.5 5.3 MDG 5.3 Contraceptive prevalence rate Percentage of women age 15-49 years currently married or in union who are using (or whose partner is using) a (modern or traditional) contraceptive method 12.2 5.4 MDG 5.6 Unmet need Percentage of women age 15-49 years who are currently married or in union who are fecund and want to space their births or limit the number of children they have and who are not currently using contraception 26.6 A The age-specific fertility rate is defined as the number of live births to women in a specific age group during a specified period, divided by the average number of women in that age group during the same period, expressed per 1,000 women. (...) Modern methods Traditional methods No method 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Per cent Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 10 Maternal and newborn health MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 5.5a 5.5b MDG 5.5 MDG 5.5 Antenatal care coverage Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years who were attended during their last pregnancy that led to a live birth (a) at least once by skilled health personnel (b)at least four times by any provider 79.1 50.7 5.6 Content of antenatal care Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years who had their blood pressure measured and gave urine and blood samples during the last pregnancy that led to a live birth 62.8 5.7 MDG 5.2 Skilled attendant at delivery Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years who were attended by skilled health personnel during their most recent live birth 77.7 5.8 Institutional deliveries Percentage of women age 15-49 years with a live birth in the last 2 years whose most recent live birth was delivered in a health facility 27.7 5.9 Caesarean section Percentage of women age 15-49 years whose most recent live birth in the last 2 years was delivered by caesarean section 9.1 Post-natal health checks MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 5.10 Post-partum stay in health facility Percentage of women age 15-49 years who stayed in the health facility for 12 hours or more after the delivery of their most recent live birth in the last 2 years 51.5 5.11 Post-natal health check for the newborn Percentage of last live births in the last 2 years who received a health check while in facility or at home following delivery, or a post-natal care visit within 2 days after delivery 27.7 5.12 Post-natal health check for the mother Percentage of women age 15-49 years who received a health check while in facility or at home following delivery, or a post-natal care visit within 2 days after delivery of their most recent live birth in the last 2 years 26.6 Figure 6 : P lace of del iver y and post -natal health checks , Sudan MICS, 2014 71 8 7 28 78 78 Place of delivery Post-natal health check for the newborn Post-natal health check for the motherPer cent Home deliveries Health facility deliveries Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 11 CHILD DEVELOPMENT Child development MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 6.1 Attendance to early childhood education Percentage of children age 36-59 months who are attending an early childhood education programme 22.3 6.5 Availability of children’s books Percentage of children under age 5 who have three or more children’s books 1.5 6.6 Availability of playthings Percentage of children under age 5 who play with two or more types of playthings 45.5 LITERACY AND EDUCATION Literacy and educationviii MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 7.1 MDG 2.3 Literacy rate among young people Percentage of young people age 15-24 years who are able to read a short simple statement about everyday life or who attended secondary or higher education (a) women 59.8 7.2 School readiness Percentage of children in first grade of primary school who attended pre-school during the previous school year 69.7 7.3 Net intake rate in primary education Percentage of children of school-entry age who enter the first grade of primary school 36.8 7.4 MDG 2.1 Primary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) Percentage of children of primary school age currently attending primary or secondary school 76.4 7.5 Secondary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) Percentage of children of secondary school age currently attending secondary school or higher 28.4 7.6 MDG 2.2 Children reaching last grade of primary Percentage of children entering the first grade of primary school who eventually reach last grade 80.4 7.7 Primary completion rate Number of children attending the last grade of primary school (excluding repeaters) divided by number of children of primary school completion age (age appropriate to final grade of primary school) 79.3 7.8 Transition rate to secondary school Number of children attending the last grade of primary school during the previous school year who are in the first grade of secondary school during the current school year divided by number of children attending the last grade of primary school during the previous school year 90.7 7.9 MDG 3.1 Gender parity index (primary school) Primary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) for girls divided by primary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) for boys 0.98 7.10 MDG 3.1 Gender parity index (secondary school) Secondary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) for girls divided by secondary school net attendance ratio (adjusted) for boys 1.07 Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 12 Figure 7 : Educat ion indicators by sex , Sudan MICS, 2014 School readiness 66 73 Net intake rate in primary education Primary school completion rate Transition rate to secondary school 36 38 85 74 90 91 Attendance to early childhood education Primary school attendance Secondary school attendance 22 23 77 75 27 29 Children reaching last grade of primary 80 81 Boys Girls Note: All indicator values are in per cent Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 13 CHILD PROTECTION Birth registration MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.1 Birth registration Percentage of children under age 5 whose births are reported registered 67.3 Child labor MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.2 Child labor Percentage of children age 5-17 years who are involved in child laborix 24.9 Child discipline MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.3 Violent discipline Percentage of children age 1-14 years who experienced psychological aggression or physical punishment during the last one month 63.9 Figure 8 : Chi ld d isc ip l in ing methods , chi ldren age 1 -14 years , Sudan MICS, 2014 22 64 53 Other 34 Severe 14 Only non-violent discipline Any violent discipline Psychological aggression Physical punishment Per cent Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 14 Early marriage and polygyny MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.4 Marriage before age 15 Percentage of women age 15-49 years who were first married before age 15 11.9 8.5 Marriage before age 18 Percentage of women age 20-49 years who were first married before age 18 38.0 8.6 Young women age 15-19 years currently married Percentage of young women age 15-19 years who are married 21.2 8.7 Polygyny Percentage of women age 15-49 years who are in a polygynous marriage 21.7 8.8a 8.8b Spousal age difference Percentage of young women who are married and whose spouse is 10 or more years older, (a)among women age 15-19 years, (b)among women age 20-24 years 7.9 23.0 Female genital mutilation/cutting MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.9 Approval for female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) Percentage of women age 15-49 years who state that FGM/C should be continued 40.9 8.10 Prevalence of FGM/C among women Percentage of women age 15-49 years who report to have undergone any form of FGM/C 86.6 8.11 Prevalence of FGM/C among girls Percentage of daughters age 0-14 years who have undergone any form of FGM/C, as reported by mothers age 15-49 years 31.5 Attitudes towards domestic violence MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.12 Attitudes towards domestic violence Percentage of women age 15-49 years who state that a husband is justified in hitting or beating his wife in at least one of the following circumstances: (1) she goes out without telling him, (2) she neglects the children, (3) she argues with him, (4) she refuses sex with him, (5) she burns the food 34.0 Children’s living arrangements MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 8.13 Children’s living arrangements Percentage of children age 0-17 years living with neither biological parent 3.4 8.14 Prevalence of children with one or both parents dead Percentage of children age 0-17 years with one or both biological parents dead 5.3 8.15 Children with at least one parent living abroad Percentage of children 0-17 years with at least one biological parent living abroad 1.8 Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 15 HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value - Have heard of AIDS Percentage of women age 15-49 years who have heard of AIDS 74.8 9.1 MDG 6.3 Knowledge about HIV prevention among young women Percentage of young women age 15-24 years who correctly identify ways of preventing the sexual transmission of HIVx, and who reject major misconceptions about HIV transmissionxi 8.5 9.2 Knowledge of mother-to- child transmission of HIV Percentage of women age 15-49 years who correctly identify all three meansxii of mother-to-child transmission of HIV 28.4 9.3 Accepting attitudes towards people living with HIV Percentage of women age 15-49 years expressing accepting attitudes on all four questionsxiii toward people living with HIV 7.9 HIV testing MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 9.4 People who know where to be tested for HIV Percentage of people age 15-49 years who state knowledge of a place to be tested for HIV (a) Women 17.0 9.5 People who have been tested for HIV and know the results Percentage of people age 15-49 years who have been tested for HIV in the last 12 months and who know their results (a) Women 1.6 9.6 Sexually active young people who have been tested for HIV and know the results Percentage of young people age 15-24 years , who have been tested for HIV in the last 12 months and who know their results (a) Women 1.2 9.7 HIV counselling during antenatal care Percentage of women age 15-49 years who had a live birth in the last 2 years and received antenatal care during the pregnancy of their most recent birth, reporting that they received counselling on HIV during antenatal care 4.2 9.8 HIV testing during antenatal care Percentage of women age 15-49 years who had a live birth in the last 2 years and received antenatal care during the pregnancy of their most recent birth, reporting that they were offered and accepted an HIV test during antenatal care and received their results 3.6 Orphans MICS Indicator Indicator Description Value 9.16 MDG 6.4 Ratio of school attendance of orphans to school attendance of non-orphans Proportion attending school among children age 10-14 years who have lost both parents divided by proportion attending school among children age 10-14 years whose parents are alive and who are living with one or both parents 0.82 Sudan MICS 2014 Page | 16 NOTES i Weight and height/length measurements were successfully completed for 80.7 and 78.2 per cent of children under age 5, respectively ii Infants receiving breast milk, and not receiving any other fluids or foods, with the exception of oral rehydration solution, vitamins, mineral supplements and medicines iii Infants receiving breast milk and certain fluids (water and water-based drinks, fruit juice, ritual fluids, oral rehydration solution, drops, vitamins, minerals, and medicines), but do not receive anything else (in particular, non-human milk and food-based fluids) iv Infants age 0-5 months who are exclusively breastfed, and children age 6-23 months who are breastfed and ate solid, semi-solid or soft foods v Breastfeeding children: Solid, semi-solid, or soft foods, two times for infants age 6-8 months, and three times for children 9-23 months; Non-breastfeeding children: Solid, semi-solid, or soft foods, or milk feeds, four times for children age 6-23 months vi The indicator is based on consumption of any amount of food from at least 4 out of the 7 following food groups: 1) grains, roots and tubers, 2) legumes and nuts, 3) dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese), 4) flesh foods (meat, fish, poultry and liver/organ meats), 5) eggs, 6) vitamin-A rich fruits and vegetables, and 7) other fruits and vegetables vii Full vaccination includes the following: BCG, three doses of Polio, three doses of Pentavalent vaccine which includes Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Hepatitis B and Haemophilus Influenzae (HiB) as a combined vaccine and Measles 1 (MCV1) administered at 9 months. viii Education indicators, wherever applicable, are based on information on reported school attendance (at any time during the school year), as a proxy for enrolment. ix Children involved in child labour are defined as children involved in economic activities at or above the age-specific thresholds, children involved in household chores at or above the age-specific thresholds, and children involved in hazardous work x Using condoms and limiting sex to one faithful, uninfected partner xi The two most common misconceptions about HIV transmission are included in the indicator calculation: i) mosquito bites and ii) sharing food with someone with HIV xii Transmission during pregnancy, during delivery, and by breastfeeding xiii People (1) who think that a female teacher who is HIV-positive and is not sick should be allowed to continue teaching, (2) who would buy fresh vegetables from a shopkeeper or vendor who is HIV-positive, (3) who would not want to keep secret that a family member is HIV-positive, and (4) who would be willing to care for a family member with AIDS in own home
Language:English
Score: 1216998.9 - https://www.unicef.org/mena/si...ril_2015-Final_HQ_Comments.pdf
Data Source: un