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Intensity and income distribution effects of job retention schemes in Italy during Covid-19 pandemics Intensity and income distribution effects of job retention schemes in Italy during Covid-19 pandemic Carlo De Gregorio, Annelisa Giordano, Isabella Siciliani Istat Meeting of the Group of Experts on Quality of Employment Online Sessions on 9, 10, 16, 17 and 18 November 2021 Job retention schemes in 2020: a widespread phenomenon • Almost 7 mln employees involved in job retention schemes (CIG) ✓44% total employees industry and services ✓18% of population in working age (15-64 yrs) ✓Belonging to 6 mln households, in which: there are 18 mln residents involved (30% of total population) … … and 3 mln < 15 yrs old (39% of respective population) … … and 14 mln in working age (36% of respective population) ✓2.000 euro of per capita CIG compensations ✓4.000 euro of per capita gross earnings not paid by employers ✓2.000 euro of per capita loss • Almost 1 mln firms involved in CIG ✓Almost two out of three firms with employees, >75% excluding microenterprises ✓774 thousands micro enterprises (≤10 persons employed) ✓10% workable hours in CIG ✓ Incidence of enterprises in CIG stable by size, lower only for microenterprises ✓ Intensity in terms of hours in inverse relation with size ✓Peaks beyond 25% in Recreation and Horeca Integrate use of statistical sources • Statistical registers (latest release 2019) ✓Business register joined with SBS register and LEED register ✓ Income register, module BDR-I ✓Population register • LFS survey (2018-2020) ✓Large set of original variables collected with the survey ✓ In particular Actual households (for equivalent income deflation) • Dataset of estimates from social security (provisional) administrative data by employer/employee/month (i.e. by «monthly job») ✓Usual information: earnings, type of contract, employer id, workable hours, ✓Detailed info on CIG events Workable hours The hours that would have been normally worked by the employee according to his labour contract Actually worked hours The hours actually worked by the employee according to his labour contract Hours in CIG The workable hours that have not been worked and subject to CIG compensation Actual gross earnings CIG compensation Potential gross earnings Gross earnings corresponding to Workable hours due to be paid by the employer Paid by the employer Paid by the social security Saved by the employer Labour income gap Job retention schemes: benefit for firms or for employees? (...) Raw data and moving averages with five terms, weighted with workable hours) Source: Istat, Asia 2019, CIG-IUM 2020 Raw data Moving average Very stable propensity to use job retention schemes by size class FIRMS FIRMS 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1 6 11 16 21 26 31 36 41 46 51 56 61 66 71 76 81 86 91 96 In ci d en ce % Firm size (number of persons employed) Workable hours in job retention schemes by firm size (% Incidence on total workable hours. (...) Raw data and moving averages with five terms, weighted with workable hours) Source: Istat, Asia 2019, CIG-IUM 2020 Raw data Moving average Use of CIG, part-time and fixed term Within the firms in CIG Rest of the firms Within the firms in CIG Rest of the firms Within the firms in CIG Rest of the firms Fixed term Part-time Part-time & fixed term 0-3 18,5 27,4 53,6 60,9 10,3 16,6 22,5 30,7 23,0 3-10 14,2 19,3 41,9 46,3 7,1 10,0 20,3 29,6 21,5 10-50 13,7 14,8 24,0 26,2 4,9 6,0 18,1 27,8 19,6 50-250 12,3 10,6 20,5 14,9 4,5 3,3 16,2 22,5 15,9 250 + 15,2 6,7 28,0 13,0 5,9 1,7 6,2 18,8 8,2 Total 14,2 13,4 29,6 27,0 5,8 5,9 14,6 25,3 16,3 0-3 15,9 23,2 38,6 44,6 6,4 10,7 16,6 21,5 17,3 3-10 11,4 15,5 29,2 32,6 4,1 5,9 14,9 19,7 16,0 10-50 11,1 12,0 15,8 17,3 2,7 3,4 12,2 17,6 14,0 50-250 10,1 9,1 13,5 10,0 2,5 1,9 9,6 12,9 10,2 250 + 12,7 5,9 18,8 9,1 3,3 1,0 3,3 10,6 5,1 Total 11,7 10,6 19,7 17,5 3,3 3,2 9,5 15,8 11,3 JOBS WORKABLE HOURS Incidence of jobs and workable hours within fixed-term or part-time contracts in the firms with employees, by size class and involvement in job retention schemes.
Language:English
Score: 1103932.8 - https://unece.org/sites/defaul...ion_1_Italy%20Presentation.pdf
Data Source: un
Secretary-General Calls Palestine Refugee Agency’s Dire Lack of Resources ‘Our Collective Failure’, Urges Effective, Innovative, Workable Solutions | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases Skip to main content Welcome to the United Nations Meetings Coverage and Press Releases Search the United Nations Search Advanced Search Toggle navigation Home Secretary-General Latest Press Releases Press Conferences General Assembly Latest Meetings Coverage Press Releases Security Council Latest Meetings Coverage Press Releases Press Conferences Economic and Social Council Latest Meetings Coverage Press Releases International Court of Justice United Nations Print Press Release SG/SM/18268-PAL/2207-REF/1246 16 November 2016 Secretary-General Statements and Messages Secretary-General Calls Palestine Refugee Agency’s Dire Lack of Resources ‘Our Collective Failure’, Urges Effective, Innovative, Workable Solutions (Delayed for technical reasons.) (...) I urge you to find effective, innovative and workable solutions to the recurring cash shortfall faced by the Agency. 
Language:English
Score: 1039923.5 - https://www.un.org/press/en/2016/sgsm18268.doc.htm
Data Source: un
Employment rates, % Total Female Male Urban Rural 1999 15-70 55.0 50.9 59.6 55.0 54.8 15-24 30.6 28.0 33.2 28.0 35.6 25-29 71.5 67.6 75.5 70.6 73.3 5 30-39 . 40-49 78.4 77.1 79.8 78.2 78.9 50-59 57.3 48.1 68.9 57.9 55.9 60-70 17.1 13.6 22.1 15.5 19.7 Workable age 64.7 62.8 66.5 63.7 67.0 Pension age 19.9 18.9 22.1 19.0 21.5 2000 15-70 55.8 51.6 60.5 55.1 57.3 15-24 30.4 27.8 32.8 27.9 36.8 25-29 72.7 69.0 76.5 71.8 74.8 30-39 . 40-49 79.1 77.5 80.8 78.3 80.9 50-59 60.3 51.7 70.9 60.2 60.2 60-70 19.5 16.1 24.4 16.2 24.7 Workable age 64.5 62.4 66.6 63.1 67.9 Pension age 22.2 21.2 24.4 19.6 26.5 2001 15-70 55.4 51.5 59.9 55.2 56.1 15-24 30.1 27.9 32.2 27.8 36.2 25-29 73.7 69.4 78.1 74.2 72.7 30-39 . 40-49 78.5 77.0 80.1 77.8 80.0 50-59 60.4 52.6 70.1 60.9 59.2 60-70 18.6 14.9 24.0 16.3 22.3 Workable age 64.1 62.2 65.9 63.1 66.6 Pension age 21.0 19.5 24.0 19.3 23.8 2002 15-70 56.0 52.2 60.1 55.7 56.6 15-24 31.1 28.6 33.6 28.9 37.0 25-29 73.8 69.4 78.2 74.2 72.9 30-39 40-49 78.7 77.6 80.0 78.4 79.5 50-59 60.6 53.6 69.2 61.0 59.6 60-70 19.6 16.3 24.4 17.0 23.9 Workable age 64.4 62.6 66.1 63.5 66.4 Pension age 21.9 20.6 24.4 19.7 25.5 2003 15-70 56.2 52.6 60.3 56.6 55.4 15-24 31.5 29.1 33.9 30,0 35.5 25-29 74.6 69.9 79.2 75.6 72.3 30-39 40-49 78.1 77.3 78.9 78.3 77.5 50-59 61.5 54.9 69.6 62.7 58.4 60-70 19.3 16.0 24.2 17.5 22.3 Workable age 64.5 62.8 66.1 64.3 64.9 Pension age 22.1 21.0 24.2 21.1 23.8 2004 15-70 59.8 55.5 64.7 60.2 59.1 15-24 36.1 33.2 39.0 34.6 40.2 25-29 80.9 73.4 88.5 82.6 76.8 6 30-39 84.0 80.1 88.1 85.3 80.9 40-49 83.6 81.9 85.4 84.7 81.1 50-59 63.0 57.4 70.1 63.0 63.1 60-70 19.7 17.6 23.0 16.4 25.3 Workable age 69.1 66.5 71.6 69.2 68.9 Pension age 23.3 23.4 23.0 21.0 27.5 2005 15-70 57.7 53.1 62.8 56.5 60.5 15-24 34.2 30.4 37.9 31.8 40.4 25-29 75.2 67.8 82.5 76.3 72.4 30-39 78.6 74.4 82.9 79.2 77.4 40-49 78.8 77.5 80.3 78.7 79.1 50-59 61.6 54.9 70.0 60.3 65.1 60-70 22.8 20.3 26.6 15.1 35.9 Workable age 65.4 62.4 68.2 64.7 67.1 Pension age 25.8 25.4 26.6 19.5 37.5 2006 15-70 57.9 53.0 63.5 56.8 60.5 15-24 35.1 30.6 39.4 32.5 41.5 25-29 75.4 68.1 82.6 76.3 73.1 30-34 78.5 72.1 85.1 78.9 77.6 35-39 81.3 78.5 84.3 82.7 78.3 40-49 79.6 77.9 81.5 80.0 78.6 50-59 60.4 53.7 68.7 58.9 64.4 60-70 21.3 19.3 24.5 13.2 35.7 Workable age 65.9 62.8 69.0 65.5 67.0 Pension age 24.5 24.5 24.5 17.8 37.5 Source: LFS; State Statistics Committee of Ukraine Table. 9. Unemployment rates, % Total Female Male Urban Rural 1999 15-70 11.6 11.3 11.8 14.0 5.8 15-24 26.4 26.2 26.7 30.1 17.4 25-29 13.7 12.9 14.4 16.5 6.6 30-39 11.2 10.8 11.5 13.6 5.1 40-49 8.8 9.0 8.7 10.6 4.1 50-59 6.6 6.8 6.4 8.4 2.6 60-70 2.7 2.7 2.7 4.2 0.9 Workable age 12.3 12.2 12.3 14.6 6.4 Pension age 3.0 3.1 2.7 4.3 1.1 2000 15-70 11.6 11.6 11.6 13.7 6.7 15-24 24.2 25.3 23.3 27.4 17.1 25-29 14.2 13.1 15.1 16.5 8.4 30-39 113 11.7 11.0 13.2 6.8 40-49 9,2 9.3 9.1 10.9 4.8 50-59 7,4 7.4 7.4 9.2 3.4 7 60-70 1.2 1.4 1.0 2.0 0.3 Workable age 12.4 12.7 12.2 14.4 7.5 Pension age 1.5 1.8 1.0 2.5 0.3 2001 15-70 10.9 10.8 11.0 12.6 7.0 15-24 22.3 22.5 22.1 24.9 16.4 25-29 11.8 11.2 12.3 13.1 8.5 30-39 11.1 11.0 11.2 12.8 7.2 40-49 9.2 9.7 8.6 10.7 5.2 50-59 7.1 6.6 7.6 8.4 4.1 60-70 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.7 0.1 Workable age 11.7 11.8 11.6 13.3 7.8 Pension age 1.0 1.0 0.9 1.6 0.1 2002 15-70 9.6 9.5 9.8 11.1 6.3 15-24 19.1 19.2 19.0 21.0 15.0 25-29 10.5 10.6 10.5 12.1 6.7 30-39 9.7 9.3 10.0 11.1 6.2 40-49 8.4 8.7 8.0 9.6 5.1 50-59 6.3 5.8 6.8 7.5 3.6 60-70 0.6 0.7 0.6 1.2 0.0 Workable age 10.3 10.3 10.3 11.7 7.0 Pension age 0.8 0.9 0.6 1.3 1.4 2003 15-70 9.1 8.7 9.4 9.9 7.0 15-24 16.7 17.1 16.4 17.7 14.3 25-29 10.2 9.4 10.9 11.3 7.4 30-39 9.0 8.4 9.5 9.7 7.2 40-49 8.2 8.2 8.1 9.0 6.0 50-59 6.4 6.0 6.8 7.0 4.7 60-70 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.0 Workable age 9.7 9.5 9.8 10.5 7.7 Pension age 0.9 1.0 0.8 1.4 0.1 2004 15-70 8.6 8.3 8.9 8.7 8.4 15-24 15.7 15.4 15.9 16.5 13.9 25-29 9.3 9.6 9.0 9.0 9.9 30-39 8.4 8.4 8.3 8.3 8.6 40-49 7.9 7.8 7.9 7.7 8.3 50-59 6.1 5.1 7.1 6.0 6.4 60-70 0.6 0.7 0.6 1.1 0.1 Workable age 9.2 9.1 9.3 9.1 9.3 Pension age 1.1 1.4 0.6 1.6 0.5 2005 15-70 7.2 6.8 7.5 7.8 5.7 15-24 14.9 14.4 15.2 16.7 11.1 25-29 7.6 7.7 7.5 8.1 6.3 30-39 6.7 6.7 6.6 6.8 6.4 40-49 6.5 6.5 6.5 7.0 5.4 50-59 4.9 4.0 5.7 5.2 4.0 8 60-70 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.1 Workable age 7.8 7.7 7.9 8.3 6.6 Pension age 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.1 2006 15-70 6.8 6.6 7.0 7.3 5.8 15-24 14.1 15.3 13.2 16.1 10.1 25-29 7.3 7.2 7.4 7.6 6.7 30-34 6.8 7.4 6.3 7.1 6.3 35-39 5.5 4.9 6.1 5.2 6.1 40-49 6.0 6.1 5.9 6.1 5.7 50-59 4.7 3.7 5.7 4.9 4.4 60-70 0.1 - 0.2 0.2 0.0 Workable age 7.4 7.4 7.3 7.7 6.6 Pension age 0.1 0.0 0.2 0.1 0.0 Source: LFS; State Statistics Committee of Ukraine Table 10. (...) Minimum social guarantees dynamics Minimum wage, hua Subsistence level for workable person, hua Poverty line, hua Relation of minimum wage to subsistence level for workable person, % Relation of minimum wage to poverty line, % Share of employed whose wage in December not more minimum wage,% Share of employed whose wage in December not more subsistence level foe workable person, % 1 2 3 4 1999 74 … 126 … 58.7 2000 97 … 156 … 62.2 11.0 2001 118 311 175 37.9 67.4 11.0 62.4 2002 165 365 192 45.2 85.9 18.1 60.2 2003 205 365 220 56.2 93.2 14.6 49.7 2004 237 387 271 61.3 87.5 8.5 35.8 2005 332 453 365 73.3 91.0 10.7 26.5 2006 400 505 430 79.2 93.0 7.6 18.3 2007 413 536 500* 77.0 82.6 ... ...
Language:English
Score: 1008125.6 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...eetingdocument/wcms_359821.pdf
Data Source: un
There is a need to examine and identify challenges and barriers for Indigenous communities to implement workable and replicable emerging S&T based solutions because improving the quality of life for all in the region, and especially indigenous people, requires a new development model. (...) Challenges, barriers, and policy Issues for integrating Indigenous knowledge / experiences with Science, Technology, and Innovation. (20 minutes) Panel Input: To help define and implement workable and replicable emerging S&T based solutions and new development model for improving the quality of life for Indigenous People. Moderator: Invited Representative from Guatemala  Invited Panelist from Mexio, “Policy issues perspective” (7 minutes)  Invited Panelist from Indigenous Intercultural University, “Challenges and barriers” (6 minutes)  Invited Panelist from Indigenous Studies, University of Saskatchewan (7 minutes) C. Workable and replicable emerging S&T based solutions, and potential framework for integrating Indigenous knowledge/experiences. (22 minutes) Panel Input: To help define and implement workable and replicable emerging S&T based solutions and new development model for improving the quality of life for Indigenous People.
Language:English
Score: 996714.55 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...Peoples%20STI%20and%20SDGs.pdf
Data Source: un
After years of shifting policies and heated debate, UNHCR said that the ambitious but achievable recommendations would provide a common and workable asylum system within the EU through sustainable reform and revitalized financial support for host countries.   (...) Wider opportunities for protection The UNHCR document highlights two overarching opportunities to show leadership while better protecting refugees in Europe and abroad, namely moving ahead with sustainable asylum reform; and providing more support for the countries taking in refugees.  🔹A truly common + workable asylum system inside the EU 🔹 Revitalized financial support for countries hosting forcibly displaced people outside the EU Here are some ways the EU can make the new year more robust for refugee protection. https://t.co/vHuyFLqVwV — UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency (@Refugees) January 9, 2020 The agency proposal says that “fair and fast asylum procedures need to be established to quickly determine who needs international protection and who does not.”  (...) UNHCR also recommends that, with EU Member States receiving a disproportionate number of asylum claims, there is a need to ensure a truly common and workable asylum system. The agency encourages both countries, which will serve six months each in the presidency, to advance work on an effective solidarity mechanism, including through relocation arrangements, prioritizing family unity.
Language:English
Score: 974846.5 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2020/01/1055091
Data Source: un
Pursuant to (a) the substantive results achieved by the Expert Group, (b) the feedback received from countries on the workability and feasibility of the indicators and requested information for reporting, and (c) the outcomes of the high-level session on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) organized at the Sixth Ministerial Conference “Environment for Europe” (Belgrade, 10–12 October 2007), the Steering Committee decides to extend the mandate of the Expert Group on Indicators for ESD until the end of 2009, to implement the following tasks: (a) Prepare a set of descriptors containing explanatory notes to each indicator, which will serve as a supporting tool to enhance effective reporting by Governments; (b) Prepare a set of policy recommendations/guidance on competence in ESD in the education sector; (c) Other tasks agreed by the Steering Committee. 2. (...) Pursuant to (a) the substantive results achieved by the Expert Group, (b) the feedback received from countries on the workability and feasibility of the indicators and requested information for reporting, and (c) the outcomes of the high-level session on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) organized at the Sixth Ministerial Conference “Environment for Europe” (Belgrade, 10–12 October 2007), the Steering Committee decides to extend the mandate of the Expert Group on Indicators for ESD until the end of 2008, to implement the following task: To prepare a set of descriptors containing explanatory notes to each indicator, which will serve as a support tool to enhance effective reporting by Governments. 2.
Language:English
Score: 962280.1 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA...C-3/InformaitonPaperNo.1.e.pdf
Data Source: un
UNHCR’s  2021 EU Presidency Recommendations  propose predictable and principled measures rooted in solidarity for a workable, rights-based and sustainable EU asylum system. (...) “The 2021 EU Presidencies have a pivotal role to facilitate discussions that pave the way to a common and workable EU asylum system that protects people fleeing war and persecution.” (...) Dignified returns for people wishing to go back to their countries of origin or who are found not in need of international protection are equally crucial for a workable and well-managed system. A truly common and effective EU asylum system also requires a predictable solidarity mechanism with states receiving a disproportionate number of asylum claims.
Language:English
Score: 961475.8 - https://www.unhcr.org/neu/4995...er-for-refugee-protection.html
Data Source: un
PRSPs), migration profiles and development mainstreaming project Possible outcomes: models with effective programs that factor migration into development planning; an informal survey by the WG on Policy Coherence, Data and Research 13 Session 2.2: Addressing South-South Migration and Development Policies Showcase: Linkages of migrant movements with development, development deficits and other drivers of South-South migration Possible outcomes: strengthen capacities to manage sub-regional migration, especially through improved data gathering & analysis Effective models for govt cooperation with CS 14 Roundtable 3: Managing Migration and Perceptions of Migration for Development Outcomes Issues to be addressed: How to manage public perceptions of migration, to better protect/support migrants; and how to ensure that migration management policies protect migrants and families adequately Aim: concrete solutions involving shared responsibilities of key actors including countries of origin, transit, destination, media, private sector, CS, migrants and diaspora 15 Session 3.1: Shaping Public Perceptions of Migrants and Migration Showcase: how public perceptions of migrants/migration can influence the capacity of migrants to contribute to development Possible Outcomes: workable models of awareness-raising and informed public debate and interactions between policy makers, politicians, media and community 16 Session 3.2: Migrant Protection as Integral to Migration Management Showcase: migration management strategies that protect migrants in vulnerable & irregular situations Possible Outcome: generate tools that policy makers and practitioners members could voluntarily use to achieve the above 17 Roundtable 4: Gender, Human Rights and Migration Issues: to reinforce gender as a means of analyzing the migration-development connections; and strengthen protection of migrant domestic workers Possible outcome: models of gender- based practices that affect the development impacts of migration; factor gender in Migration Profiles 18 . Session 4.1: Gender, Human Rights and Migration: Challenges and Opportunities Showcase: workable policies and initiatives by Governments to improve access of women migrants and their families to basic rights Possible outcomes: models of legal, health, social and other protections available to women 19 Session 4.2 : Protecting Migrant Domestic Workers: Enhancing their Development Potential. Showcase: workable policies and initiatives from government improving access to women Possible outcomes: workable models of legal, health and other social protection available to women; domestic worker protection checklist 20 RT COORDINATORS RT 1 - Irena Omelaniuk / (Iomelaniuk@yahoo.com.au) RT 2 - Rolph Jenny / (rkjenny@gfmd.org) RT 3 - Chukwu-Emeka Chikezie (cechikezie@gmail.com) RT 4 – Elizabeth Adjei / (director@myzipnet.com) 21 The second phase Assessment Process in 2012 • The 2 December 2011 Special Session on the GFMD Assessment (Phase I) at the GFMD 2012 Concluding Debate unanimously endorsed the 2011 Report on Phase I of the Assessment.
Language:English
Score: 961074.2 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...he%202012%20Global%20Forum.pdf
Data Source: un
CEPE, the European Council of the Paint, Printing ink and Artists’ Colours Industry, COLIPA, the European Cosmetics Association, and FEA, UPU in January 2011 to suggest allowing shipments of post under strict but workable conditions for both general public, postal services to secure safe shipments for all actors. 4. (...) CEPE, the European Council of the Paint, Printing ink and Artists’ Colours Industry, COLIPA, the European Cosmetics Association, and FEA, the European Aerosol Fede suggest allowing shipments of certain dangerous goods (aerosols and paints) post under strict but workable conditions for both general public, postal services, shippers ll actors.
Language:English
Score: 942865.8 - https://www.icao.int/safety/Da...011/DGPWG.2011.IP.003.2.en.pdf
Data Source: un
Implementing integrated solutions at scale:            •    Planning land and water resources – a crucial first step,            •    Packaging workable solutions,            •    Avoiding and reversing land degradation;           3. (...) No “one size fits all” solution exists, but there is a “full package” of workable solutions : However, these will succeed only when there is a conducive enabling environment, strong political will, sound policies and inclusive governance, and full participatory planning processes across all sectors and landscapes.
Language:English
Score: 942865.8 - https://www.fao.org/land-water/solaw2021/kmf/keyfindings/en/
Data Source: un